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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 88 88 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 44 44 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 42 42 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 12 12 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 8 8 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 7 7 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 7 7 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906 4 4 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1759 AD or search for 1759 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 88 results in 79 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abercrombie, James, 1706- (search)
Abercrombie, James, 1706- military officer; born at Glassaugh, Scotland, in 1706. In 1746 he became a colonel in the British army; was made major-general in 1756, lieutenant-general in 1759, and general in 1772. He came to America in 1756, where he held the chief military command until the arrival of Lord Loudoun. After the departure of that officer, Abercrombie resumed the command. In July, 1758, he attacked Ticonderoga (q. v.) with a large force, but was repulsed with a loss of about 2,000 men. He was succeeded by General Amherst in September following; returned to England in 1759, and became a member of Parliament, wherein he advocated the obnoxious measures that led to the War of the Revolution in 1775. He died April 28, 1781, while Governor of Stirling Castle. military officer; son of Gen. James Abercrombie. He had served on the staff of General Amherst, in America, and was commissioned a lieutenant in the British army in March, 1770. While leading the British G
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Acrelius, Israel, 1714-1800 (search)
Acrelius, Israel, 1714-1800 Clergyman: born in Osteraker, Sweden, Dec. 25, 1714: was ordained in 1743; came to America to preside over the Swedish congregations in New Sweden in 1749. His work was marked with success, but after seven years toil he was forced to resign by ill-health, and returned to Sweden. His publications include The Swedish colonies in America (1759, translated into English in 1874), and articles on America. He died in Fellingsbro, April 25, 1800. See New Sweden, founding of.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adair, John, 1759-1840 (search)
Adair, John, 1759-1840 Military officer; born in Chester county, S. C., in 1759. He served in the Continental army during the Revolution, and in the wars against the frontier Indians in 1791-93. He was United States Senator in Congress in 1805-6; and as volunteer aide to General Shelby at the battle of the Thames, in 1813, he showed much bravery and skill. He distinguished himself as commander of the Kentucky troops in the battle of New Orleans, in January, 1815. From 1820 to 1824 he wa1759. He served in the Continental army during the Revolution, and in the wars against the frontier Indians in 1791-93. He was United States Senator in Congress in 1805-6; and as volunteer aide to General Shelby at the battle of the Thames, in 1813, he showed much bravery and skill. He distinguished himself as commander of the Kentucky troops in the battle of New Orleans, in January, 1815. From 1820 to 1824 he was governor of Kentucky, having served in the legislature of that State; and from 1831 to 1833 was a Representative in Congress. He died in Harrodsburg, Ky., May 19, 1840.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Amherst, Sir Jeffrey, 1717- (search)
erst, Sir Jeffrey, 1717- Military officer; born in Kent, England, Jan. 29, 1717; became an ensign in the army in 1731, and was aide to Lord Ligonier and the Duke of Cumberland. In 1756 he was promoted to major-general and given the command of the expedition against Louisburg in Sir Jeffrey Amherst. 1758, which resulted in its capture, with other French strongholds in that vicinity. In September, that year, he was appointed commander-in-chief in America, and led the troops in person, in 1759, that drove the French from Lake Champlain. The next year he captured Montreal and completed the conquest of Canada. For these acts he was rewarded with the thanks of Parliament and the Order of the Bath. In 1763 he was appointed governor of Virginia. The atrocities of the Indians in May and June of that year aroused the anger and the energies of Sir Jeffrey, and he contemplated hurling swift destruction upon the barbarians. He denounced Pontiac as the chief ringleader of mischief ; and,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barney, Joshua, 1759- (search)
Barney, Joshua, 1759- Naval officer; born in Baltimore, Md., July 6, 1759. Inclined to a seafaring life, he went to sea in his early youth: and when he was only sixteen years of age, an accident caused the care of his ship to devolve upon him. He met the exigency with courage and skill. He entered the Continental navy, at its first organization in 1775, as master's mate, in the sloop Hornet, and joined Commodore Hopkins. In an action between the Continental schooner Wasp and British brig Tender, in Delaware Bay, before he was seventeen years of age, his conduct was so gallant that he was made a lieutenant. In that capacity he served in the Sachem (Capt. I. Robinson), and after a severe action with a British brig, in which his commander was wounded, young Barney brought her into port. Soon afterwards he was made a prisoner, but was speedily released, and in the Andrea Doria he was engaged in the defence of the Delaware River in 1777. He was again made prisoner, and was exchan
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boscawen, Edward, 1711- (search)
Boscawen, Edward, 1711- Naval officer; born in Cornwall, England, Aug. 19, 1711; son of Viscount Falmouth; was made a captain in the royal navy in March, 1737. Distinguished at Porto Bello and Carthagena, he was promoted to the command of a 60-gun ship in 1744, in which he took the Media. He signalized himself under Anson in the battle off Cape Finisterre in 1747, and against the French in the East Indies as rear-admiral the next year. He made himself master of Madras, and returned to England in 1751. Admiral of the Blue, he commanded an expedition against Louisburg, Cape Breton, in 1758, with General Amherst. In 1759 he defeated the French fleet in the Mediterranean, capturing 2,000 prisoners. For these services he was made general of the marines and member of the privy council. Parliament also granted him a pension of $15,000 a year. He died Jan. 10, 1761.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bradstreet, John, 1711-1774 (search)
ppointed captain of a company in the regiment of Royal Americans; and late in the same year he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel of the same regiment, and deputy quartermaster-general, with the rank of colonel. He was quartermaster-general of Abercrombie's forces, with the rank of colonel, in the expedition against Ticonderoga in July, 1758; and in August he led an expedition which captured Fort Frontenac. Bradstreet was with Amherst in his expedition against Ticonderoga and Crown Point in 1759. In May, 1762, he was commissioned a major-general. Pontiac's war had filled the settlements on the western frontiers with dire alarm, and they sent piteous calls for help. In July, 1764, a little army of 1,100 men, composed chiefly of provincial battalions from New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut, led by Bradstreet, reached Fort Niagara on its way farther westward. Bradstreet found a large concourse of Indians there, of various nations. ready to renew friendship with the English, and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burke, Edmund, 1730-1797 (search)
Burke, Edmund, 1730-1797 Statesman; born in Dublin, June 1, 1730; was one of fifteen children of Richard Burke, an attorney, and was descended from the Norman De Burghs, who early settled in Ireland; graduated at Trinity College, Dublin (1748); studied law, and in 1756 published his famous essay on The sublime and beautiful. In 1758-59 he and Dodsley established the Annual Registor; and in 1765 he was made secretary to Premier Rockingham. He entered Parliament in 1766. There he took an active and brilliant part in debates on the American question, and always in favor of the Americans. advocating their cause with rare eloquence. In 1771 he was appointed agent for the colony of New York. He lost some popularity by advocating the claims of the Roman Catholics in 1780, and opposing the policy of repressing the trade of Ireland. During the brief administration of the Rockingham ministry in 1782, he was a member of the privy council and paymaster of the forces. Taking a prominen
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Caldwell, James 1734- (search)
Caldwell, James 1734- Clergyman; born in Charlotte county, Va., in April, 1734. Graduating at Princeton in 1759, he became pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Elizabethtown in 1762. Zealously espousing the revolutionary cause, he was much disliked by the Tories. Appointed chaplain of a New Jersey brigade, he was for a time in the Mohawk Valley. In 1780 his church and residence were burned by a party of British and Tories; and the same year a British incursion from Staten Island pillaged the village of Connecticut Farms, where his family were temporarily residing. A soldier shot his wife through a window while she was sitting on a bed with her babe. At that time Mr. Caldwell was in Washington's camp at Morristown. In the successful defence of Springfield, N. J., June 23, 1780, when the wadding for the soldiers' guns gave out, he brought the hymn-books from the neighboring church and shouted, Now put Watts into them, boys. In an altercation at Elizabethtown Point with an Am
e Island had raised nearly 4,000 troops, and were waiting for an English squadron. Instead of a British armament, a French fleet of forty war vessels, with 3.000 veteran troops was coming over the sea. New England was greatly alarmed. It was D'Anville's armament, and it was dispersed by storms. Ten thousand troops gathered at Boston for its defence; the fort on Castle Island was made very strong. and the land expedition against Montreal was abandoned. When Quebec fell, in the autumn of 1759, the French held Montreal, and were not dismayed. In the spring of 1760, Vaudreuil, the governor-general of Canada, sent M. Levi, the successor of Montcalm, to recover Quebec. He descended the St. Lawrence with six frigates and a powerful land force. The English. under General Murray, marched out of Quebec, and met him at Sillery, 3 miles above the city; and there was fought (April 4) one of the most sanguinary battles of the war. Murray was defeated. He lost about 1,000 men, and all his
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