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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 191 191 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 184 184 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 42 42 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 35 35 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 18 18 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 13 13 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 11 11 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 7 7 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1774 AD or search for 1774 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 191 results in 173 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abolition. (search)
Abolition. During the early years of our national history, abolition was a desire rather than a purpose, and every humane and thinking man, North and South, was an abolitionist. Previous to the meeting of the first Continental Congress, in 1774, many of the colonies had made protests against the further importation of slaves, and at least two of them, Virginia and Massachusetts, had passed resolutions abolishing the traffic. The Quakers, or Society of Friends, had, since 1760, made slave-holding and slave-trading a matter of church discipline. The War for Independence, and the adoption of the Constitution, in 1787, which included the compromise resolution that provided for the continuation of the slave-trade, by permission, until 1808, caused very little change in the sentiment of the people, and all hoped that in some way, not yet imagined, the gradual and peaceful abolition of slavery would be accomplished. In 1777, Vermont, not yet admitted to the Union, formed a State cons
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John, 1735- (search)
s Parliament had no right to make such a law. He began early to write political essays for the newspapers; and. in 1768, he went to Boston, when the town was greatly excited by political disturbances. There he was counsel for Captain Preston in the case of the Boston massacre (see Boston), and in the same year (1770) he was elected to a seat in the General Court. From that time John Adams was a leader among the patriots in Massachusetts. He was a delegate to the first Continental Congress (1774), where he took a leading part. Returning. he was elected a member of the Provincial Congress. He was an efficient speaker and most useful committee-man in the Continental Congress until he was appointed commissioner to France late in 1777, to supersede Deane. He advocated. helped to frame, voted for, and signed the Declaration of Independence. and he was a most efficient member of the Board of War from June, 1776, until December, 1777. He reached Paris April 8, 1778. where he found a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John Quincy, 1767- (search)
n, and to constitute them free and independent States. Now the people of the colonies, speaking by their delegates in Congress, had not declared each colony a sovereign, free, and independent State, nor had the people of each colony so declared the colony itself, nor could they so declare it, because each was already bound in union with all the rest — a union formed de facto, by the spontaneous revolutionary movement of the whole people, and organized by the meeting of the first Congress, in 1774, a year and ten months before the Declaration of Independence. Where, then, did each State get the sovereignty, freedom. and independence which the Articles of Confederation declare it retains? Not from the whole people of the whole Union; not from the Declaration of Independence--not from the people of the State itself. It was assumed by agreement between the legislatures of the several States and their delegates in Congress, without authority from or consultation of the people at all.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Samuel, 1722-1803 (search)
ies was achieved he was a foremost leader of the patriot host. He suggested Samuel Adams. the Stamp Act Congress, and was a continual object of dread and hatred to the colonial governors. He proposed the first Committee of Correspondence in Massachusetts in 1772; and, when General Gage besought him to make his peace with the King, he replied, I trust I have made my peace with the King of kings. No personal considerations shall induce me to abandon the righteous cause of my country. In 1774 he was the chief in maturing the plan for a Continental Congress; was a member of it; and served in that body most efficiently from that time until 1781. As early as 1769 Mr. Adams advocated the independence of the colonies, and was one of the warmest supporters of it in the Congress. When debating on the Declaration of Independence, Adams said: I should advise persisting in our struggle for liberty though it were revealed from heaven that 999 were to perish, and one of 1,000 were to surviv
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, William, 1710-1780 (search)
eded as recorder of Philadelphia in 1741. He assisted Benjamin West, the painter, in his early struggles, and co-operated with Benjamin Franklin in establishing the College of Pennsylvania. Judge Allen was chief-justice of that State from 1750 to 1774. A strong loyalist, he withdrew to England in 1774. In London he published a pamphlet entitled The American crisis, containing a plan for restoring American dependence upon Great Britain. He died in England in September, 1780. educator and1774. In London he published a pamphlet entitled The American crisis, containing a plan for restoring American dependence upon Great Britain. He died in England in September, 1780. educator and author; born in Pittsville, Mass., Jan. 2, 1784: graduated at Harvard College in 1802. After entering the ministry and preaching for some time in western New York, he was elected a regent and assistant librarian of Harvard College. He was president of Dartmouth College in 1817-20, and of Bowdoin College in 1820-39. He was the author of Junius unmasked; a supplement to Webster's dictionary; Psalms and hymns; Memoirs of Dr. Eleazer Wheelock and of Dr. John Codmand: a discourse at the close of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ames, Fisher, 1758-1808 (search)
Ames, Fisher, 1758-1808 Orator and statesman; born in Dedham, Mass., April 9, 1758; was graduated at Harvard College in 1774; taught school until 1781; then began the practice of law: and soon displayed rare oratorical powers. He wrote political essays for Boston newspapers, over the signatures of Brutus and Camillus. In Congress from 1789 until 1797 he was always distinguished for his great business talent, exalted patriotism, and brilliant oratory. Ardently devoted to Washington, personally and politically, he was chosen by his colleagues to write the address to the first President on his retiring Fisher Ames. from office in 1797. After leaving Congress he devoted himself to the practice of his profession; but finally, on account of declining health, gave it up to engage exclusively in agricultural pursuits. In 1804 he was chosen president of Harvard College, but declined the honor. He received the degree of Ll.D. from that institution. His orations, essays, and letter
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Andre, John, 1751- (search)
a, young Andre returned, and entered a mercantile house in London when he was eighteen years of age. He was a youth of great genius-painted well and wrote poetry with fluency. His literary tastes brought to him the acquaintance of literary people. Among these was the poetess, Anna Seward. of Lichfield, to whose cousin, Honora Sneyd, Andre became warmly attached. They were betrothed, but their youth caused a postponement of their nuptials, and Andre entered the army and came to America, in 1774, as lieutenant of the Royal Fusileers. With them, in Canada, he was taken prisoner by Montgomery, at St. Johns (Nov. 2, 1775), and was sent to Lancaster, Pa. In December, 1776, he was exchanged, and promoted to captain in the British army. He was appointed aide to General Grey in the summer of 1777, and on the departure of that officer he was placed on the staff of Sir Henry Clinton, by whom he was promoted (1780) to the rank of major, and appointed adjutant-general of the British forces in
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bainbridge, William, 1774-1833 (search)
Bainbridge, William, 1774-1833 Naval officer; born in Princeton, N. J., May 7, 1774. At the age of sixteen years he went to sea, and at nineteen commanded a ship. On the reorganization of the navy in 1798 he was appointed a lieutenant. He and his vessel and crew were captured in the West Indies by a French cruiser in September of that year, but were released in December, when, returning home, he was promoted to the command of a brig. In May, 1800, he was commissioned a captain, and in the ship Washington be carried tribute from the United States to the Dey of Algiers, by whom he was treated with much insolence. By threats of capture and a declaration of war by the Algerine ruler, he was compelled to take an embassy to Constantinople for that petty despot. On his return, with power given him by the William Bainbridge. Sultan, Bainbridge frightened the insolent Dey, compelling him to release all Christian prisoners then in his possession. He returned to the United States i
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blair, John, 1732-1800 (search)
Blair, John, 1732-1800 Jurist; born in Williamsburg, Va., in 1732; was educated at the College of William and Mary; studied law at the Temple, London; soon rose to the first rank as a lawyer; was a member of the House of Burgesses as early as 1765, and was one of the dissolved Virginia Assembly who met at the Raleigh Tavern, in the summer of 1774, and drafted the Virginia non-importation agreement. He was one of the committee who, in June, 1776, drew up the plan for the Virginia State government, and in 1777 was elected a judge of the Court of Appeals; then chief-justice, and, in 1780, a judge of the High Court of Chancery. he was one of the framers of the national Constitution; and, in 1789. Washington appointed him a judge of the United States Supreme Court. He resigned his seat on the bench of that court in 1796, and died in Williamsburg, Va., Aug. 31, 1800.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bland, Richard, 1710-1776 (search)
Bland, Richard, 1710-1776 Statesman: born in Virginia. May 6, 1710; was educated at the College of William and Mary; became a fine classical scholar, and was an oracle touching the rights of the colonies. He was a member of the House of Burgesses from 1745 until his death — a period of thirty-one years; and he was one of the most active of its patriotic members. In 1774 he was a delegate in the Continental Congress, but declined to serve the next year. In 1766 he published one of the ablest tracts of the time, entitled An inquiry into the rights of the British colonies. He died in Williamsburg, Va., Oct. 26, 177
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