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most distinguished merchants. Colonel Francis had three brothers, who became officers in the Revolutionary army, and did their native Medford credit. Ebenezer was commissioned as Captain by the Continental Congress, July 1, 1775 ; next year rose to the rank of Colonel, and commanded a regiment on Dorchester Heights from August to December, 1776. Authorized by Congress, he raised the eleventh Massachusetts regiment, and, in January, 1777, marched at the head of it to Ticonderoga. Monday, July 7, 1777, a skirmish took place between the eleventh Massachusetts regiment and the British, at Hubbardton, near Whitehall, N. Y., in which Colonel Francis fell. A private journal of Captain Greenleaf, now in the library of the Massachusetts Historical Society, says:-- Colonel Francis first received a ball through his right arm; but still continued at the head of his troops till he received the fatal wound through his body, entering his right breast. He dropped on his face. His chapla
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
6 Three RiversJune 8, 1776 Fort Sullivan (Charleston Harbor)June 28, 1776 Long IslandAug. 27, 1776 Harlem PlainsSept. 16, 1776 White PlainsOct. 28, 1776 Fort WashingtonNov. 16, 1776 TrentonDec. 26, 1776 PrincetonJan. 3, 1777 HubbardtonJuly 7, 1777 OriskanyAug. 6, 1777 BenningtonAug. 16, 1777 BrandywineSept. 11, 1777 Bemis's Heights (first), Sept. 19; (second)Oct. 7, 1777 PaoliSept. 20, 1777 GermantownOct. 4, 1777 Forts Clinton and MontgomeryOct. 6, 1777 Fort MercerOct. 22, 1777 6 Three RiversJune 8, 1776 Fort Sullivan (Charleston Harbor)June 28, 1776 Long IslandAug. 27, 1776 Harlem PlainsSept. 16, 1776 White PlainsOct. 28, 1776 Fort WashingtonNov. 16, 1776 TrentonDec. 26, 1776 PrincetonJan. 3, 1777 HubbardtonJuly 7, 1777 OriskanyAug. 6, 1777 BenningtonAug. 16, 1777 BrandywineSept. 11, 1777 Bemis's Heights (first), Sept. 19; (second)Oct. 7, 1777 PaoliSept. 20, 1777 GermantownOct. 4, 1777 Forts Clinton and MontgomeryOct. 6, 1777 Fort MercerOct. 22, 1777
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hubbardton, battle at. (search)
Hubbardton, battle at. Generals Fraser and Riedesel, with British and German troops, began a pursuit of the Americans as soon as their flight from Ticonderoga was discovered. They overtook their rear-guard, about 1,200 strong, July 7, 1777, at Hubbardton, Vt. The main body of St. Clair's army had marched towards Castleton, leaving the rear-guard, under Col. Seth Warner, to gather up stragglers. While waiting their arrival, Warner was struck by the van of the pursuers, and a sharp engagement took place. Colonel Francis, of New Hampshire, was killed. The Americans were dispersed, and fled, excepting 200 who were made prisoners. The pursuers lost almost as many in killed and wounded, and soon gave up the chase. St. Clair, with about 200 men, made his way through the woods to Fort Edward. The Americans also lost 120 in killed and wounded. The British captured about 200 stand of arms.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Revolutionary War, (search)
by troops under ex-Governor Tryon April 26, 1777 Colonel Meigs, with whale-boats from Guilford, attacks the British forces at Sag Harbor, destroying vessels and stores and taking ninety prisonersMay 23, 1777 Stars and Stripes adopted by CongressJune 14, 1777 British under General Howe evacuate New Jersey, crossing to Staten IslandJune 30, 1777 British under Burgoyne appear before Ticonderoga July 1, 1777 American garrison withdraw from New York July 6, 1777 Battle of Hubbardton, Vt July 7, 1777 British Gen. Richard Prescott surprised and captured near Newport by Lieutenant-Colonel Barton July 10, 1777 Miss Jane McCrea captured by Indians in British employ at Fort Edward, N. Y., and shot and scalpedJuly 27, 1777 On the approach of Burgoyne General Schuyler evacuates Fort Edward, and retreats down the Hudson ValleyJuly 29, 1777 General Lafayette, who volunteers his services to Congress, is commissioned major-general July 31, 1777 Lafayette introduced to Washington in Philadel
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Vermont, (search)
s, to form a separate State......Sept. 25, 1776 Convention at Westminster declares Vermont a separate, free, and independent jurisdiction or State, as New Connecticut, ......Jan. 17, 1777 Convention at Windsor names the State Vermont, adopts a constitution, and appoints a provisional council of safety for the State......July 2-8, 1777 British troops under Generals Fraser and Riedesel disperse the rear guard of St. Clair's army under Colonels Francis and Warner at Hubbardton......July 7, 1777 Council of Vermont appoints commissioners of sequestration to seize the property of all persons in the State who had repaired to the enemy ......July 28, 1777 Battle of Bennington; General Burgoyne sends about 1,000 German troops under Colonels Baume and Breyman to seize provisions at Bennington; they are routed by Americans under General Stark......Aug. 16, 1777 Legislature at Windsor divides the State into two counties: one east of the Green Mountains, called Cumberland, and a
Roxbury 1735; John, b. 19 Jan. 1717-18, m. Esther Hovey of Brookline 7 Dec. 1739. By a second w. Mary Bayley (pub. 13 Oct. 1744), he had Thaddeus, bap. 28 Sept. 1746; Susanna, bap. 24 Ap. 1748; Seth Ingersoll, bap. 8 July 1750, m. Lucy Brown 7 July 1777, and Sarah Goddin 5 Oct. 1786; Mary, b. 1752; Jonathan, bap. 15 Sept. 1754; Abijah; Josiah; Lucy. Wil-Liam the f. d. 1768. His w. Mary (who afterwards m.——Bray) and her six children survived; also William, the eldest son by the first wife; th, b. 16 Feb. 1750-51; John, b. 28 Sept. 1753. 8. Ebenezer, S. of Ebenezer (7), rem. to Beverly 1764, was a Colonel in the Revolutionary Army, highly distinguished for his bravery and good conduct, and was slain in battle at Hubbardton, Vt., 7 July 1777. By his w. Judith Wood, m. 1766, he had four daughters and one son, Ebenezer Francis, of Boston, Treasurer of Harvard College, who d. 20 Sept. 1858. 9. Aaron, s. of Ebenezer (7), rem. to Beverly, where he d. 1825, a. about 74; his son Eben
22 Oct. 1706; Jonathan, b. 8 July 1708, m. Hannah Gore of Roxbury 1731, d. in Camb., and his bro. Josiah of Newton was appointed adm. 18 Nov. 1751; Deborah, b. 6 Oct. 1712, m. James Green 20 Mar. 1733-4; Mary, b. 16 Jan. 1715-16, m. John Bowles of Roxbury 1735; John, b. 19 Jan. 1717-18, m. Esther Hovey of Brookline 7 Dec. 1739. By a second w. Mary Bayley (pub. 13 Oct. 1744), he had Thaddeus, bap. 28 Sept. 1746; Susanna, bap. 24 Ap. 1748; Seth Ingersoll, bap. 8 July 1750, m. Lucy Brown 7 July 1777, and Sarah Goddin 5 Oct. 1786; Mary, b. 1752; Jonathan, bap. 15 Sept. 1754; Abijah; Josiah; Lucy. Wil-Liam the f. d. 1768. His w. Mary (who afterwards m.——Bray) and her six children survived; also William, the eldest son by the first wife; the others had deceased, leaving heirs. From the long interval between 1718 and 1746, these children might be thought to compose two families; but the father names them all in his will, describing the second class as his five younger sons, and his thr
hel had Susanna, b. 28 Nov. 1734; Abigail, b. 6 Oct. 1736; Lucy, b. 12 Mar. 1738-9, m. Edward Wilson 23 Nov. 1758; Sarah, b. 6 June 1741; Ebenezer, b. 22 Dee. 1743; William, b. 20 Ap. 1746; Thomas, b. 15 July 1748, m. Susanna Hill 11 July 1771; Aaron, b. 16 Feb. 1750-51; John, b. 28 Sept. 1753. 8. Ebenezer, S. of Ebenezer (7), rem. to Beverly 1764, was a Colonel in the Revolutionary Army, highly distinguished for his bravery and good conduct, and was slain in battle at Hubbardton, Vt., 7 July 1777. By his w. Judith Wood, m. 1766, he had four daughters and one son, Ebenezer Francis, of Boston, Treasurer of Harvard College, who d. 20 Sept. 1858. 9. Aaron, s. of Ebenezer (7), rem. to Beverly, where he d. 1825, a. about 74; his son Ebenezer, b. at Bev. 18 Oct. 1790, has for many years resided here, and is father of Rev. Eben Francis. 10. John, s. of Ebenezer (7), rem. to Beverly, was adjutant in the regiment of his brother, Col. Francis, at the Hubbardton Battle, afterwards Col.
; and we trust they are now happy, where wars forever cease. note.—Heath's Memoirs contain many references to the several events named in this sermon. Warren—was the general officer killed at Bunker Hill.—See Frothingham's Siege of Boston, 151, &c. Gardner—was Colonel Thomas Gardner, of Cambridge (of the Parish now Brighton), mortally wounded at Bunker Hill, June 17, died July 3, 1775.—See Paige's Cambridge, 418-21, 557, &c. Francis—was Colonel Ebenezer Francis, killed at Hubbardton, July 7, 1777; a native of Medford, and well known to Mr. Cooke's parishioners; for sketch, see Brooks's Hist. Medford, 194-6. Scammel—was mortally wounded and taken before Yorktown, and died Oct. 6, 1781. Lee, Memoirs of the War, says, This was the severest blow experienced by the allied army throughout the siege; not an officer in our army surpassed in personal worth and professional ability this experienced soldier. Scammel was a native of Massachusetts. This sermon, under the title of
he same generals, four campaigns will hardly be enough to subjugate her colonies. Frederic to Maltzan, 28 Aug., 1777. All good judges agree with me that, if the colonies remain united, the mother country will never subjugate them. Ibid., 7 July, 1777. In the interim, Frederic wished the ministry to know that he had refused to the American emissaries the use of Embden as a base for troubling British navigation. You have only to declare to the British government, so he instructed his en that my marine is nothing but a mercantile marine, of which I know the limits too well to go beyond them. Ibid., 19 July, 1777. If the colonies shall sustain their independence, a direct commerce with them will follow, of course. Ibid., 7 July, 1777. Having taken his position towards England, he proceeded to gain the aid of France as well as of Russia against the annexation of Bavaria to the Austrian dominions; and in the breast of the aged Maurepas, Chap. III.} 1777. whose experien
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