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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 1 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Hampshire, (search)
y a third representative from the State, Matthew Thornton......November, 1776 New Hampshire troops engage in the battle of Bennington, under John Stark, who is made brigadier-general by Congress......Aug. 18, 1777 Articles of Confederation ratified by New Hampshire, March 4, 1778, and signed by the State representatives at Philadelphia, Josiah Bartlett and John Wentworth......Aug. 8, 1778 Phillips Academy at Exeter founded......1781 Daniel Webster born at Franklin, N. H.......Jan. 18, 1782 Sixteen towns, on the eastern side of the Connecticut River refuse to send delegates to a constitutional convention in New Hampshire, and desire to be admitted into the new State of Vermont. Vermont agrees to accept these additional towns, but Congress in its act of admission makes it an indispensable preliminary that the revolted towns shall be restored to New Hampshire. The towns at last accept the situation and become part of New Hampshire......1782 A convention which meets at
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Webster, Daniel 1782-1852 (search)
Webster, Daniel 1782-1852 Statesman; born in Salisbury, N. H., Jan. 18, 1782; graduated at Dartmouth College in 1801, defraying a portion of his college expenses by teaching school. After teaching in Maine he studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1805. He soon rose to eminence in his profession at Portsmouth, N. H., and was a member of Congress in 1813-17, where he soon took a foremost rank in debate. In 1816 he settled in Boston, and, by his services in the Dartmouth College case, which was carried to the Supreme Court (1817), he was placed in the front rank in his profession. In that court he ably argued many important cases, in which he exhibited superior skill and ability. In 1820 he was a member of the Massachusetts constitutional convention. He again entered Congress in 1823, when he made a famous speech on the Greek Revolution, and, as chairman of the judiciary committee, effected measures for a complete revision of the criminal law of the United States. While
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
became tutor there and then studied law. His published works include The progress of Dulness (1772-74) ; an Elegy on the times (1774); his famous McFingal, a modern Epic poem (1774-82). He was associated with the Hartford wits in the production of The Anarchiad (1786-87), and was judge of the superior court from 1801 until 1819. The poetical works of John Trumbull were published in 1820. Died in Detroit, Mich., May 10, 1831. Webster, Daniel Born in Salisbury (now Franklin), N. H., Jan. 18, 1782. Graduating from Dartmouth in 1801, he studied law, was admitted to the bar, and was unsurpassed as a lawyer and orator. He became U. S. representative from New Hampshire and later from Massachusetts, and in 1827 was made U. S. Senator from the latter state. Some of the best known of his public orations are those on the Bunker Hill monument, on the Pilgrim anniversary, and the eulogium on Jefferson and Adams. His most celebrated political speech is his Reply to Hayne. A collection o
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 16: Webster (search)
heir dignity. Moreover, Webster did not give his leisure, as many statesmen have done, to writing memoirs or history or to the discussion in book form of some question which interested him. The reason was simple. When Webster was not in office or when he had an interval between the sessions of Congress, he gave his time to the practice of his profession, and great cases before the courts absorbed all his energy. I Daniel Webster was born in Salisbury [now Franklin], New Hampshire, 18 January, 1782, of pioneer stock. A frail child, and therefore spared the hard work of his father's farm, he was sent to Phillips Exeter Academy and to Dartmouth College, from which he graduated in 1800. He taught school as a makeshift, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1805. He practised first at Boscawen and then at Portsmouth, where he rapidly rose to prominence both as lawyer and public speaker. In 1813 he was sent to the House of Representatives as a Federalist member from Massachus