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d from a legislature, with tolls regulated by law. The enterprising citizens of Medford were among the first movers of the project, and the steadiest helpers of the work. It contributed so much to the wealth of our town, by inducing ship-builders to settle and work among us, that a notice of it belongs to our records. I find the following statistics in an Historical Sketch of the Middlesex Canal, gathered by their faithful agent, Caleb Eddy, Esq., and dated 1843:-- In the month of May, 1793, a number of gentlemen associated for opening a canal from the waters of the Merrimac, by Concord River, or in some other way, through the waters of Mystic River, to the town of Boston. There were present at this meeting the Hon. James Sullivan, Benjamin Hall, Willis Hall, Ebenezer Hall, Jonathan Porter, Loammi Baldwin, Ebenezer Hall, jun., Andrew Hall, and Samuel Swan, Esq. After organizing, by the choice of Benjamin Hall as chairman, and Samuel Swan as clerk, the Hon. James Sullivan,
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Historical Sketch of the old Middlesex Canal. (search)
when leisure was still allowable. The vision is quickly dispelled by the rush and roar of the train sweeping on to its destination, as the canal itself was obliterated by the growth of steam power. It may, perhaps, help to an appreciation of the vast changes which accompanied this transition if we will remember that, roughly speaking, the Middlesex Canal belongs to the first half of the nineteenth century, while the railroad belongs to the latter half of that period. In the month of May, 1793, a certain number of gentlemen assembled for the purpose of ‘opening a canal from the waters of the Merrimac, by Concord River or in some other way, through the waters of Mystic River to the town of Boston.’ There were present at this meeting the Hon. James Sullivan, who was at this time attorney general, and later governor of Massachusetts, and in whose fertile mind the idea originated; Benjamin Hall, Willis Hall, Ebenezer Hall, Jonathan Porter, Loammi Baldwin, a leader in the enterprise
m general.--On the contrary the Convention extended it to all articles of "prime necessity." Those articles of "prime necessity" it declared to be bread, wine, butchers' meat, grain, oats, vegetables, fruits, coal, wood, butter, cheese, linen, cotton stuffs, and dress of every description except silks. If this was not making it general there is no meaning in the word. She (France) "adhered to it through all the dark hours of her revolution." She did not such thing. The law was passed in May, 1793, by the Convention, and it was repealed a few weeks after the overthrow of Robespierre, which occurred on the 27th day of July, 1797. Sixteen months was the very utmost of its term of duration. It was passed without any reference to the army, but solely to supply the large cities, which the revolution fed with rations as it did the army. They had first ruined the currency, and then, finding that producers would not part with their produce for the worthless assignats, and that the large ci