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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burr, Aaron, 1716- (search)
and again in 1798. In 1789 he was appointed adjutant-general of the State, and commissioner of revolutionary claims in 1791. A member of the United States Senate from 1791 till 1797, Burr was a conspicuous Democratic leader in that body; and in the Presidential election in 1800 he and Thomas Jefferson had an equal number of votes in the electoral college. The House of Representatives decided the choice in favor of Jefferson on the thirty-sixth ballot, and Burr became Vice-President. In July, 1804, he killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel; and the next year he undertook his mad and mysterious enterprise in the West, which resulted in his trial for treason. In March, 1805, Burr's term of office as Vice-President ended, and he descended to private life an utterly ruined man. But his ambition and his love of intrigue were as strong as ever, and he conceived schemes for personal aggrandizement and pecuniary gain. It was the general belief, at that time, in the United States, that the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tripoli, War with (search)
and, going to Tangier, demanded an explanation of the Emperor of Morocco, who disclaimed the act and made a suitable apology. Then he proceeded to bring Tripoli to terms. Soon afterwards the Philadelphia fell into the hands of the Tripolitans. Little further of much interest occurred until early in 1804, when the boldness of the Americans in destroying the Philadelphia in the harbor of Tripoli greatly alarmed the Bey (see Philadelphia, the). For a while Preble blockaded his port; and in July, 1804, he entered the. harbor (whose protection lay in heavy batteries mounting 115 guns) with his squadron. The Tripolitans also had in the harbor nineteen gunboats, a brig, two schooners, and some galleys, with 25,000 soldiers on the land. A sheltering reef afforded further protection. These formidable obstacles did not dismay Preble. On Aug. 3 he opened a heavy cannonade and bombardment from his gunboats, which A Street scene in Tripoli. alone could get near enough for effective servi