hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 28, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for September 6th, 1812 AD or search for September 6th, 1812 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
20, 1794 TippecanoeNov. 7, 1811 War of 1812-15. Fort MackinawJuly 17, 1812 BrownstownAug. 4, 1812 MaguagaAug. 9, 1812 Chicago (Massacre at)Aug. 16, 1812 Detroit (Surrendered)Aug. 16, 1812 Fort HarrisonSept. 4 and 5, Fort MadisonSept. 4-6, 1812 GananoquiSept. 21, 1812 Queenstown HeightsOct. 13, 1812 St. RegisOct. 23, 1812 Fort NiagaraNov. 21, 1812 Black RockNov. 28, 1812 French Town (River Raisin)Jan. 18-22, 1813 Elizabethtown (Canada)Feb. 7, 1813 OgdensburgFeb. 22, 1813 York 20, 1794 TippecanoeNov. 7, 1811 War of 1812-15. Fort MackinawJuly 17, 1812 BrownstownAug. 4, 1812 MaguagaAug. 9, 1812 Chicago (Massacre at)Aug. 16, 1812 Detroit (Surrendered)Aug. 16, 1812 Fort HarrisonSept. 4 and 5, Fort MadisonSept. 4-6, 1812 GananoquiSept. 21, 1812 Queenstown HeightsOct. 13, 1812 St. RegisOct. 23, 1812 Fort NiagaraNov. 21, 1812 Black RockNov. 28, 1812 French Town (River Raisin)Jan. 18-22, 1813 Elizabethtown (Canada)Feb. 7, 1813 OgdensburgFeb. 22, 1813 York
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burchard, Samuel Dickinson, 1812-1891 (search)
Burchard, Samuel Dickinson, 1812-1891 Clergyman; born in Steuben, N. Y., Sept. 6, 1812; was graduated at Centre College, Danville, Ky., in 1836; became a temperance lecturer and later a Presbyterian minister in New York. In 1884, near the close of the Presidential campaign, he unexpectedly brought himself into notoriety by speaking of the Democrats at the close of an address to a party of Republicans as the party of Rum, Romanism, and rebellion. These words were scarcely uttered before the leaders of the Democratic party published them throughout the country. The election was very close, and it was several days before the official count of New York State was received. That State went Democratic by a small majority. The remark of Dr. Burchard was said to have influenced many thousands of votes, and to have lost the election to Mr. Blaine. He died in Saratoga, N. Y., Sept. 25, 1891.