Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1820 AD or search for 1820 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 242 results in 207 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Duchesne, Philippa rose, 1769-1852 (search)
Duchesne, Philippa rose, 1769-1852 Missionary; born in France in 1769; came to America in 1818 and engaged in religious work among the Indians of Louisiana. In 1820 she founded in Barriens, on the Bois-Brule, the first permanent home of the sisterhood of the Sacred Heart in America, and lived to see the order established in all the large cities of the United States. She died in St. Charles, La., in 1852.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eads, James Buchanan, 1820- (search)
Eads, James Buchanan, 1820- Engineer; born in Lawrenceburg, Ind., May 23, 1820. His controlling genius was manifested in early childhood. His first invention was an apparatus for recovering vessels with their cargoes from the muddy depths of a river. Eads made a fortune by it. In 1861 he was employed by the national government to construct gunboats, suitable for use in Western-rivers. In the space of sixty-five days he constructed seven iron-clad gunboats. In 1862 he built six more; also heavy mortar-boats. These vessels performed mighty deeds during the Civil War. At the beginning of July, 1874, James Buchanan Eads. he completed a magnificent iron railroad bridge across the Mississippi at St. Louis, one of the finest structures of the kind in the world. Then he pressed upon the attention of the government his plan for improving the navigation of the mouth of the Mississippi by jetties. He was authorized to undertake it (and was very successful), for which the governmen
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eckford, Henry, 1775- (search)
Eckford, Henry, 1775- Naval constructor; born in Irvine, Scotland, March 12, 1775; learned his profession with an uncle at Quebec, began business for himself in New York in 1796, and soon took the lead in his profession. During the War of 1812-15 he constructed ships-of-war on the Lakes with great expedition and skill; and soon after the war he built the steamship Robert Fulton, in which, in 1822, he made the first successful trip in a craft of that kind to New Orleans and Havana. Made naval constructor at Brooklyn in 1820, six ships-of-the-line were built after his models. Interference of the board of naval commissioners caused him to leave the service of the government, but he afterwards made ships-of-war for European powers and for the independent states of South America. In 1831 he built a war-vessel for the Sultan of Turkey, and, going to Constantinople, organized a navy-yard there, and there he died, Nov. 12, 1832.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ellery, William, 1727-1820 (search)
Ellery, William, 1727-1820 A signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Newport, R. I., Dec. 22, 1727; graduated at Harvard in 1747; became a merchant in Newport; and was naval officer of Rhode Island in 1770. He afterwards studied and practised law at Newport, and gained a high reputation. An active patriot, he was a member of Congress from 1776 to 1785, excepting two years, and was very useful in matters pertaining to finance and diplomacy. He was especially serviceable as a member of the marine committee, and of the board of admiralty. During the occupation of Rhode Island by the British he suffered great loss of property, but bore it with quiet cheerfulness as a sacrifice for the public good. He was chief-justice of the Superior Court of Rhode Island, and in 1790 collector of the revenue at Newport. Mr. Ellery was a strenuous advocate of the abolition of slavery. He died in Newport, Feb. 15, 1820.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ellis, John Willis, 1820-1861 (search)
Ellis, John Willis, 1820-1861 Governor; born in Rowan county, N. C., Nov. 25, 1820; graduated at the University of North Carolina in 1841, and admitted to the bar in 1842. He was governor of North Carolina in 1858-61. In the name of his State he occupied Fort Macon, the works at Wilmington, and the United States arsenal at Fayetteville, Jan. 2, 1861. In April of the same year he ordered the seizure of the United States mint at Charlotte. He died in Raleigh, N. C., in 1861.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eustis, William, 1753-1825 (search)
Eustis, William, 1753-1825 Physician; born in Cambridge, Mass., June 10, 1753; died in Boston, Feb. 6, 1825; was graduated at Harvard in 1772, and studied medicine under Dr. Joseph Warren. As a surgeon he served throughout the Revolutionary War, and was a member of the Massachusetts legislature from 1788 to 1794. He was in the governor's council two years, and was in Congress from 1800 to 1805, and from 1820 to 1823. Secretary of War from 1809 until 1812, he then resigned, for there was much fault found with his administration. In 1815 he was sent as minister to Holland, and was governor of Massachusetts in 1824, dying while in office, Feb. 6, 1825.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fairbanks, George R. 1820- (search)
Fairbanks, George R. 1820- Historian; born in Watertown, N. Y., July 5, 1820; graduated at Union College in 1839; admitted to the bar in 1842; removed to Florida in 1842; commissioned major in the Confederate army in 1862. He is the author of History and antiquities of St. Augustine; History of Florida, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Farmer, Moses Gerrish 1820-1893 (search)
Farmer, Moses Gerrish 1820-1893 Electrician; born in Boscawen, N. H., Feb. 9, 1820; graduated at Dartmouth College in 1844; taught in Elliot, Me., and in Dover, N. H., for two years. During his leisure hours while in Dover he invented several forms of electro-motors, one of which he used in his experimental workshop to drive a vertical lathe, and the other was used on a miniature railway. Both motors were originally designed to illustrate his lectures. He demonstrated that the electrical current could be used for discharging torpedoes and in submarine blasting. On his miniature railway he transported by electricity the first passengers ever so carried in the United States. In 1847 he moved to Framingham, Mass., and invented the telegraph fire-alarm. In 1865 he invented a thermo-electric battery and also built the first dynamo machine. In 1880 he patented an automatic electric-light system. Besides these inventions he brought to light and perfected many others. He is consid
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Federalists. (search)
il the close of the century. The leading members of the party were Washington, Hamilton, Adams, Jay, and many of the less distinguished patriots of the Revolution. Their opponents were called Anti-Federalists. In the contests of the French Revolution, which had influence upon public opinion in the United States, the Federalists leaned towards England, and the Anti-Federalists or Republicans towards France. In the Presidential election of 1800, the Federalists were defeated and Jefferson was elected. The party became unpopular because of its opposition to the War of 1812; and it fell into fatal disrepute because of the Hartford Convention, whose proceedings, done in secret, were supposed to be treasonable. The party had become so weak in 1816 that Monroe, the Republican candidate for President, received the electoral votes of all the States but two. At his re-election, in 1820, the vote of the States was unanimous for him. Then the party was disbanded. See Anti-Federalist party.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Field, Thomas W. 1820- (search)
Field, Thomas W. 1820- Historian; born in Onondaga Hill, N. Y., in 1820; was the author of a History of the battle of long Island; Historic and Antiquarian scenes in Brooklyn and vicinity; An essay towards an Indian bibliography, etc. He was well known for his extremely valuable collection of books on American history, which was sold at auction shortly after his death, in Brooklyn, N. Y., Nov. 25, 1881. Field, Thomas W. 1820- Historian; born in Onondaga Hill, N. Y., in 1820; was the author of a History of the battle of long Island; Historic and Antiquarian scenes in Brooklyn and vicinity; An essay towards an Indian bibliography, etc. He was well known for his extremely valuable collection of books on American history, which was sold at auction shortly after his death, in Brooklyn, N. Y., Nov. 25, 1881.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...