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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 192 192 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 34 34 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 30 30 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 27 27 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 10 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. 9 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 8 8 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 7 7 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature. You can also browse the collection for 1821 AD or search for 1821 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 4 document sections:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 4: the New York period (search)
el Ricketson, well calls the sublime chant of wild geese --and to bring it into human song. His merely boyish poems sent by his kindred for publication,--the Thanatopsis in particular, written at seventeen,--have perhaps never been equaled in literature by any boy of that age; his blank verse was beyond that of any American poet. His fame has not quite held its own, and the latest edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica does not mention him at all, but his collected poems, which appeared in 1821,--in the same year with Cooper's Spy and two years after the Sketch book,--form the true beginning of our literary annals. In 1825 his verses brought him an invitation to New York which he accepted, and he became thenceforth a part of the New York influence. It was said of Mr. Bryant by an accomplished English critic that he partook, in an eminent degree, of that curious and almost rarefied refinement, in which, oddly enough, American literature seems to surpass even the literature of the
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 7: the Concord group (search)
hen offered by the college. His classmate Josiah Quincy, who gained the first prize in one case where Emerson got the second, on an ethical subject, remarked in his diary that the dissertation on ethics was dull and dry; and as he also regarded Emerson's Class Day poem as rather poor, it is worth while to remember that there is no known criticism quite so merciless as that of college boys upon one another. It was with these credentials, at any rate, that Emerson went forth into the world in 1821 and became himself a clergyman. Ten years later he had retired from the pulpit and was on his way to Europe, where he stayed nearly a year. It was during this visit that he made the acquaintance of Landor and Wordsworth, as described in English traits. He also went to Craigenputtock to see Carlyle, who long afterwards, talking with Longfellow, described his visit as being like the visit of an angel. This was the beginning of that lifelong friendship the terms of which are recorded in t
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
ius was remarkably precocious. Thanatopsis, perhaps his most famous poem, was written at the age of seventeen. His first creditable volume of verse, published in 1821, included Thanatopsis and the Lines to a water-fowl. Numerous other volumes appeared between that date and 1864. The translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey we of narration, The Deerslayer (1841), The last of the Mohicans (1826), the Pathfinder (1840), The pioneers (1823), and The Prairie (1827). Other works are The spy (1821); The Pilot (1823); the Red Rover (1828); The water-witch (1830); Homeward bound (1838); the Wing-and-wing (1842); and Afloat and Ashore (1844). Died at CooperstoNew York City, Sept. 21, 1820. Emerson, Ralph Waldo Born in Boston, Mass., May 25, 1803, of a long line of ministerial ancestors. Graduating from Harvard in 1821, he taught at his brother's school and later studied theology. After a pastorate of nearly three years he left the active ministry. With others he formed the cir
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, chapter 13 (search)
loo. 1817. Keats's Poems. 1817. Coleridge's Biographia Literaria. 1820-1830. George IV. 1821. De Quincey's Confessions of an English opium Eater. 1822-1824. Lamb's Essays of Elia. 1824ngland. 1814. Peace with England. 1817. Monroe President. 1820. Irving's Sketch book. 1821. Bryant's Poems. 1821. Cooper's The spy. 1821. James G. Percival's Poems. 1821. R. H. Da1821. Cooper's The spy. 1821. James G. Percival's Poems. 1821. R. H. Dana's Dying Buccaneer. 1826. Longfellow's Poems. 1827. Fitz-Greene Halleck's Poems. 1827. Miss Sedgwick's Hope Leslie. 1827. N. P. Willis's Sketches. 1830. W. E. Channing's Discourses, r1821. James G. Percival's Poems. 1821. R. H. Dana's Dying Buccaneer. 1826. Longfellow's Poems. 1827. Fitz-Greene Halleck's Poems. 1827. Miss Sedgwick's Hope Leslie. 1827. N. P. Willis's Sketches. 1830. W. E. Channing's Discourses, reviews, and Miscellanies. 1831. Whittier's Legends of New England. 1833. Poe's Ms. Found in a Bottle. 1835. Drake's The Culprit Fay and other poems. 1835. Emerson's Historical discourse at1821. R. H. Dana's Dying Buccaneer. 1826. Longfellow's Poems. 1827. Fitz-Greene Halleck's Poems. 1827. Miss Sedgwick's Hope Leslie. 1827. N. P. Willis's Sketches. 1830. W. E. Channing's Discourses, reviews, and Miscellanies. 1831. Whittier's Legends of New England. 1833. Poe's Ms. Found in a Bottle. 1835. Drake's The Culprit Fay and other poems. 1835. Emerson's Historical discourse at Concord. 1835. W. G. Simms's The Yemassee and the Partisan. 1836. Holmes's Poems. 1837. Prescott's Ferdinand and Isa-bella. 1838. Hawthorne's Fanshawe. 1839. Longfellow's Voices of the