Your search returned 6 results in 6 document sections:

b. Mar. 1, 1810; m. John A. Downie, April 12, 1838. 2-8Samuel Albree m. Martha Hodge, of Amherst, May 16, 1786, who d. Apr. 2, 1841, aged 72. He d. Feb. 22, 1841. He had--  8-15Samuel R., b. Oct. 29, 1787; d. Feb. 26, 1788.  16Thomas R., b. Apr. 10, 1790; d. Oct. 2, 1791.  17Joseph, b. Oct. 27, 1792; d. Apr. 19, 1796.  18Elizabeth, b. Nov. 14, 1794; m. Peter Hall.  19Samuel, b. June 1, 1799; d. June 23, 1827.  20Martha, b. Sep. 10, 1801; d. Apr. 20, 1802. 6-12George Albree m., Mar. 27, 1828, Martha Curing, of Pittsburg, and had--  12-21John, b. Mar. 14, 1829.  22George C., b. Jan. 23, 1831; d. July 1, 1835.  23William A., b. June 9, 1833; d. Dec. 22, 1836.  24Joseph, b. Sep. 15, 1835.  25Robert C., b. Feb. 21, 1838.  26Elizabeth P., b. Oct. 15, 1840. Family of Albree. We can trace this Medford family to Nassau, in the Island of New Providence, the capital of the Bahamas. In 1672, the English government sent Mr. Collingworth to superintend the settlement
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whittemore, Amos 1759-1828 (search)
Whittemore, Amos 1759-1828 Inventor; born in Cambridge, Mass., April 19, 1759; reared a farmer; became a gunsmith; and then, with his brother, a manufacturer of cotton and wool-cards, or card-cloth. He claimed to have invented a machine for puncturing the leather and setting the wires, which was patented in 1797. Before that time the work had been performed slowly by hand. The establishment of spinning machinery in New England (see Slater, Samuel) had made the business of card-making profitable, and so useful was Whittemore's machine that the patent was sold for $150,000. His brother Samuel afterwards repurchased it and carried on the business of making card-cloth. Amos died in West Cambridge, March 27, 1828. Whittier, John Greenleaf
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 2: school days in Hartford, 1824-1832. (search)
to cultivate a taste for painting, and I wish to improve it; it was what my dear mother admired and loved, and I cherish it for her sake. I have thought more of this dearest of all earthly friends these late years, since I have been old enough to know her character and appreciate her worth. I sometimes think that, had she lived, I might have been both better and happier than I now am, but God is good and wise in all his ways. A letter written to her brother Edward in Boston, dated March 27, 1828, shows how slowly she adopted the view of God that finally became one of the most characteristic elements in her writings. I think that those views of God which you have presented to me have had an influence in restoring my mind to its natural tone. But still, after all, God is a being afar off. He is so far above us that anything but the most distant reverential affection seems almost sacrilegious. It is that affection that can lead us to be familiar that the heart needs. But ea
Feb. 1807; Clarissa, b. 3 Nov. 1789, m. Thomas Davis 2 Oct. 1808, d. 11 May 1814; Harriet, b. 6 Ap. 1792, d. 9 Sept. 1802; Nancy, b. 1 May 1794, d. 25 Sept. 1802; Gershom, b. 20 Jan. 1796; Henry, b. 1 Sept. 1798; Letitia, b. 26 Mar. 1799, m. Horatio H. Fiske 2 Mar. 1818; Mary, b. 2 Sept. 1801, d. 24 Aug. 1802; Harriet, b. 13 Aug. 1806, m. Herman Foster 8 Nov. 1826. Amos the f. resided in Menotomy, and was widely renowned as a card maker, and inventor of a machine for that purpose. He d. 27 Mar. 1828; his w. Helen d. 15 Oct. 1829. 30. William, s. of Thomas (20), m. Elizabeth, dau. of Nehemiah Cutter, 2 Nov. 1783, and had Elizabeth, Hannah, Sarah, William, Caroline; the foregoing d. unm. James Madison, m. twice, a physician, d. in Brighton 7 Dec. 1863, aged 68; Thomas Jefferson, m. and removed to New York; Mary Ann, m. Henry S. Low of Boston, is deceased; John Hancock, name changed to William, m. Lucinda King of Charleston, S. C., served in the Mexican War, and d. in Oregon about 1
Feb. 1807; Clarissa, b. 3 Nov. 1789, m. Thomas Davis 2 Oct. 1808, d. 11 May 1814; Harriet, b. 6 Ap. 1792, d. 9 Sept. 1802; Nancy, b. 1 May 1794, d. 25 Sept. 1802; Gershom, b. 20 Jan. 1796; Henry, b. 1 Sept. 1798; Letitia, b. 26 Mar. 1799, m. Horatio H. Fiske 2 Mar. 1818; Mary, b. 2 Sept. 1801, d. 24 Aug. 1802; Harriet, b. 13 Aug. 1806, m. Herman Foster 8 Nov. 1826. Amos the f. resided in Menotomy, and was widely renowned as a card maker, and inventor of a machine for that purpose. He d. 27 Mar. 1828; his w. Helen d. 15 Oct. 1829. 30. William, s. of Thomas (20), m. Elizabeth, dau. of Nehemiah Cutter, 2 Nov. 1783, and had Elizabeth, Hannah, Sarah, William, Caroline; the foregoing d. unm. James Madison, m. twice, a physician, d. in Brighton 7 Dec. 1863, aged 68; Thomas Jefferson, m. and removed to New York; Mary Ann, m. Henry S. Low of Boston, is deceased; John Hancock, name changed to William, m. Lucinda King of Charleston, S. C., served in the Mexican War, and d. in Oregon about 1
. (Mary, a dau. of Amos, Jr., was bap. with this group 5 May, 1805.) The dau. Helen m. Jonas Prentiss, 22 Feb. 1807; Clarissa m. Thomas Davis of Boston, 2 Oct. 1808; Letitia m. Horatio H. Fiske of Boston, 29 Mar. 1818; Harriet M. A. m. Herman Foster, of Boston, 8 Nov. 1826; Amos's child (Mary ) d. 24 Aug. 1802, a. 1 (11 mos.—g. s.); Harriet, of Amos, d. 9 Sept. 1802, a. 10 (g. s.); Nancy, of Amos, d. 25 Sept. 1802, a. 8 (g. s.); one other dau. Helen, d. young. Amos, Sen., the father, d. 27 Mar. 1828, a. 69. [His wife was Helen Weston, of Concord, m. 18 June, 1781, d. 15 Oct. 1829, a. 66.] He was the inventor of the once celebrated card-machine for making cotton and wool-cards. He took his first patent on this machine 2 June, 1797, for the term of fourteen years; and went to England, in 1799, to secure a patent in that country. A renewal of his original patent was secured by the unanimous vote of Congress, for a second term of fourteen years, on 3 Mar. 1809, and on 20 July, 1812, h