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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 1 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
reception of Lafayette in St. Louis......April 29, 1825 Gov. Frederick Bates dies......Aug. 1, 1825 Seat of government removed from St. Charles to Jefferson City, and legislature holds its first session there......Nov. 20, 1826 Joseph Smith, the Mormon leader, having found a location for Zion at Independence, Jackson county, in 1831, which he names The New Jerusalem, arrives from Kirtland, O., with many followers......1832 St. Louis University, founded 1829; incorporated......December, 1832 Mormons in Missouri publish a paper, the Evening Star, the sentiments of which are obnoxious to the people, who tar and feather the bishop and two others, and throw the presses into the river. On Oct. 31 an encounter occurs in which two citizens and one Mormon are killed. On Nov. 2 the Mormons attack Independence, but are routed and forced to promise to leave the county before. Jan. 1, 1834......Nov. 2, 1833 Congress adds the Platte purchase, a triangle north of the Missouri Riv
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 6: Law School.—September, 1831, to December, 1833.—Age, 20-22. (search)
enjoyments of the past, and of the too palpable certainty that those enjoyments will never again be met except by Memory in her pleasant wanderings. But stop!— We truly are in a sad state. Civil war, in a portentous cloud, hangs over us. South Carolina, though the sorest part of our system, is not the only part that is galled. Georgia cannot, Virginia cannot, stomach the high Federal doctrines which the President has set forth in his proclamation, Andrew Jackson's Proclamation of Dec., 1832, upon the occasion of the nullifying ordinance of South Carolina. and upon which the stability of the country rests. That is a glorious document, worthy of any President. Our part of the country rejoices in it as a true exposition of the Constitution, and a fervid address to those wayward men who are now plunging us into disgrace abroad and misery at home. Judge Story speaks much of its value; and so striking did its argument appear to him, that he has introduced it into a note to his w
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
ah. He continued to reside in that city until his death in 1898. Brigadier-General Hugh W. Mercer Brigadier-General Hugh W. Mercer, a grandson of Gen. Hugh Mercer, of revolutionary fame, was born in Virginia in 1808. In 1824 he was appointed a cadet at the United States military academy, and graduated in 1828 as second lieutenant, Second artillery. He served at Fortress Monroe, Va., in the artillery school for practice, then at Savannah, Ga., and at the arsenal in Augusta. From December, 1832, to February, 1834, he was aide-de-camp to Major-General Scott, being commissioned first lieutenant of artillery October 10, 1834. He was at Charleston, S. C., during the nullification excitement (1832-33), at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. (1833-34), and on quartermaster duty at Savannah, Ga. (1834-35). On April 30, 1835, he resigned. He was first lieutenant of the Chatham artillery from 1835 to 1845, and cashier of the Planters' bank at Savannah from 1841 to 1861. When Georgia seceded from th
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 7: 1832-1834: Aet. 25-27. (search)
accede to this offer send me your inaugural dissertation, and make me acquainted with your literary work, that I may take the necessary steps with the Curatorio. Consider this proposition as a proof of my high appreciation of your literary efforts and of my regard for you personally. Agassiz's next letter to Humboldt is to consult him with respect to the call from Heidelberg, while it is also full of pleasure at the warm welcome extended to him in Neuchatel. Agassiz to Humboldt. December, 1832. . . . At last I am in Neuchatel, having, indeed, begun my lectures some weeks ago. I have been received in a way I could never have anticipated, and which can only be due to your good — will on my behalf and your friendly recommendation. You have my warmest thanks for the trouble you have taken about me, and for your continued sympathy. Let me show you by my work in the years to come, rather than by words, that I am in earnest about science, and that my spirit is not irresponsive
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Historical papers (search)
intellect, unstained by one drop of human blood, unmoistened by a solitary tear. Ireland will be redeemed and disenthralled, not perhaps by a repeal of the Union, but by the accomplishment of such a thorough reform in the government and policy of Great Britain as shall render a repeal unnecessary and impolitic. The sentiments of O'Connell in regard to the means of effecting his object of political reform are distinctly impressed upon all his appeals to the people. In his letter of December, 1832, to the Dublin Trades Union, he says: The Repealers must not have our cause stained with blood. Far indeed from it. We can, and ought to, carry the repeal only in the total absence of offence against the laws of man or crime in the sight of God. The best revolution which was ever effected could not be worth one drop of human blood. In his speech at the public dinner given him by the citizens of Cork, we find a yet more earnest avowal of pacific principles. It may be stated, said he,