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L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 1 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Pauline Cushman, the celebrated Union spy and scout of the Army of the Cumberland. (search)
Cushman, the celebrated Union spy and scout of the Army of the Cumberland. Among the wild and dashing exploits which have signalized the recent war-rivalling in heroic and dramatic interest the most famous achievements of the earlier days of chivalry-few are more striking or picturesque than the simple narrative of facts which we are about to relate. Miss Pauline Cushman, or Major Cushman, as she is, by right, most generally called, was born in the city of New Orleans, on the 10th day of June, 1833, her father being a Spaniard, a native of Madrid, and a prosperous merchant of the Crescent city, and her mother a French woman of excellent social position and attainments. In course of time, her father met with losses which followed one another in rapid succession, and unable to stay the tide of adversity, after a brave but unavailing struggle, he abandoned his enterprises in New Orleans, and removed with his family to Grand Rapids, Michigan. This town was at that time little mor
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 11: first mission to England.—1833. (search)
ith Mr. Cresson in his public capacity as the Agent of the American Colonization Society. He followed up his advantage by an open letter in the London Times, repeating the challenge, which equally failed of effect. The sole course left was an exparte arraignment of the Colonization Society, which was appointed at the Wesleyan Chapel of the Rev. Thomas Price, One of the editors of the Eclectic Review, and a notable literary critic in his day. in Devonshire Square, for Monday evening, June 10, 1833. At this meeting, presided over by James Cropper, Mr. Lib. 3.126. Cresson was present, no doubt reluctantly, and certainly ill-advisedly. For when the lecturer, after depicting the Colonization Society in the vein of his Thoughts, told how Clarkson had been deceived by its agent assuring him that its first object was to emancipate all the slaves, the chairman interrupted him, saying that this was a grave charge; Mr. Cresson was present—would he admit or deny having made such a sta
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General John Rogers Cooke. (search)
us success of each of these reverential manifestations. He was a member of the Executive Committee of the Southern Historical Society, and held enshrined in his heart its every interest. He was an earnest, consistent Christian, and active in the cause of his church and of suffering humanity. Whatever he did, he did worthily and well, with his whole heart and being. John Rogers Cooke was born to a soldier's heritage, of parents of Virginian birth, at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, June 10th, 1833. He was the son of General Philip St. George Cooke, a native of Frederick county, Virginia, and a distinguished officer of the United States Army, who is still alive. John Rogers Cooke was graduated from Harvard University as a civil engineer in 1854. He served as an engineer for a time on the Iron-Mountain railroad, in Missouri, and distinction in the profession seemed before him. Hereditary instinct, however, stimulated by his environment, asserted itself, and he sought and recei