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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 4 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 1 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
The picturesque pocket companion, and visitor's guide, through Mount Auburn 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pennsylvania, (search)
edger of Philadelphia founded, price one cent......March 25, 1837 Charter of Second United States Bank expires (see United States record, 1832-34)......1837 United States Bank of Pennsylvania and all other banks of the State suspend specie payment during the commercial panic of......1837 State constitution amended......Feb. 20, 1838 Pennsylvania Hall in Philadelphia, dedicated as an abolition hall on the 14th, is burned by a mob......May 17, 1838 Buckshot war......November-December, 1838 [In a close election between Whigs and Democrats for control of the legislature, which was to choose a United States Senator, both parties charged fraud. The Whigs ultimately receded from their position, leaving the Democrats in power. A remark made that the mob would feel the effect of ball and buckshot before night gave this episode the name of buckshot war. ] Iron successfully made with anthracite coal at Mauch Chunk......Jan. 12, 1839 United States Bank of Pennsylvania aga
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Vermont, (search)
a Senate and General Assembly......1836 Vermont asylum for the insane at Brattleboro, incorporated November, 1834, is opened......December, 1836 Legislature adopts anti-slavery resolutions......1837 State capitol at Montpelier completed......1837 Small band of Vermont patriots, organized on the Canada side of the Vermont line to invade the province, threatened by 1,600 or 1,700 Canadian troops,. decide to return to Vermont, but are compelled to surrender by General Wool......December, 1838 Marble first quarried at Rutland......1844 License law passed......1844 School fund abolished to pay the State debt......1845 First slate quarry in the State opened at Fairhaven......1845 Act providing State superintendent of common schools, with town superintendents and district committees......Nov. 5, 1845 Local option law passed......1846 Two brass field-pieces, captured at Bennington, given to Vermont by Congress......July 10, 1848 Jacob Collamer appointed P
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 6: school-teaching in Boston and Providence. (1837-1838.) (search)
the good of all concerned that 1 should teach again, I wish to do it, and by the success I have already attained, and by the confidence I now feel in my powers, both of arrangement of a whole and action on parts, feel myself justified in thinking I may do it to much greater pecuniary advantage and with much more extensive good results to others than I have yet done. A plan suggested by Cincinnati friends for a school in that city came to nothing, and she left Providence for Boston in December, 1838. This was the end of her school-teaching, though she continued to take occasional private pupils in languages and other matters; for whom she was paid, as she wrote to her younger brother, at the rate of two dollars an hour, or, rather, half a dollar for quarter-hour lessons. That winter, however, as she tells him, she is too tired to take them at any price; she must rest; but she will give her younger sister lessons in German, and will teach Latin and composition to himself. This wa
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
him. It was this handshaking that prompted Mrs. Chapman's remark: Righteousness and peace have kissed each other. It was, says Mrs. Chapman herself (Ms. November, 1882), a mere jeu d'esprit whispered in the ear of Mrs. Follen, who told Harriet Martineau of it, and so it reached the ears of the Channings, and thereupon Dr. Channing said he did not know it was Mr. Garrison. Miss Martineau's version, in her article on the Martyr Age of the United States, in the Westminster Review for December, 1838, is, that Dr. Channing afterwards explained that he was not at the moment certain that it was Mr. Garrison, but that he was not the less happy to have shaken hands with him. Mr. May began the defence, and spoke pretty [well?] for May's Recollections, p. 188. Ebenezer Moseley. nearly an hour, but was frequently interrupted by the members of the committee, who, with one exception, behaved in an insolent and arbitrary manner. Mr. Loring then spoke for about fifteen or twenty minutes i
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
as replied to by Phillips with great effect. Several excellent resolutions, drawn up by Dr. Channing, passed with unexpected unanimity. The triumph has been a signal one for our side (Ms.) In this famous scene the Attorney-General spoke from the gallery, near the great gilded eagle; Mr. Phillips, from a lectern, in the body of the hall, from which Dr. Channing read his resolutions. See Mrs. Chapman's graphic account in a letter to Harriet Martineau (The Martyr Age, Westminster Review, December, 1838). His speech had already been delivered in the Liberator, and in the resolutions Lib. 7.191. (evidently from his hand) adopted by the Board of Managers. From his first editorial utterance some extracts must here be made. The amiable, benevolent, intrepid Lovejoy, he exclaimed, is no more! . . . In his martyrdom Lovejoy was certainly a martyr, said Mr. Garrison later (Lib. 8.3), but, strictly speaking, he was not—at least in our opinion—a Christian martyr. He died like Warren, not l
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
it to capture the anti-slavery organization in the plenitude of its strength, and prudence demanded a distribution of power. That the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society was to be the battle-ground between the opposing forces, was known a full month in advance. Ante, p. 253. The strategy of the clerical schismatics had been revealed to the Board by the Rev. Philo C. Pettibone, of Andover, and steps were instantly taken to baffle it. Mr. Pettibone had received in December, 1838, a letter from Right and Wrong in Mass., 1839, p. 66; Lib. 9.191. Torrey, which dwelt on the great influence of Mr. Garrison in Massachusetts, and thence argued that it would not be safe to attack him or the Liberator openly; on the great need of a new paper—which he (Mr. Torrey) had ascertained by sounding the clergymen throughout the State, and they were for it to a man. Now, Brother P., in substance continued the writer, have on a full delegation at the Annual Meeting at 10 o'clock
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Mrs. Frances Anne Kemble. (search)
hought to have made a most brilliant match,--side, the woman of genius and feeling, the heir of an illustrious name, which she had proved herself worthy to bear! For a time, all went well. Children were born. Women of a certain calibre are not long in discovering the quality of their husbands; and it is highly probable, that Frances Anne Kemble had taken the measure of Pierce Butler before the events occurred which led to their estrangement. In the fourth year of their marriage, in December, 1838, the family, for the first time since the marriage, went together to spend the winter upon the Butler plantations in South Carolina. She recorded her impressions at the time in a diary, according to her custom, which diary has been recently published. What a contrast between this work, written in 1839, and her other diary written in 1832 and 1833! In the first, there is a good deal of immaturity, a little affectation, perhaps, and, occasionally, a certain lack of the refinement and
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 8: to England and the Continent.—1867. (search)
h, and Mr. Garrison found himself by and by surrounded by a small but increasing band of men and women who were devoted to this cause, as he himself was. We have in this country a very noble woman who taught the English people much upon this question about thirty years ago; I allude to Harriet Martineau. (Cheers.) I recollect well the impression with which I read a most powerful and touching paper which she had written, and which was published in the number of the Westminster Review for December, 1838. It was entitled The Ante, 2.97, 189. Martyr Age of the United States. The paper introduced to the English public the great names which were appearing on the scene in connection with this cause in America. . . . When I read that article by Harriet Martineau, and the description of W. L. G. Breakfast, p. 20. those men and women there given, I was led, I know not how, to think of a very striking passage which I am sure must be familiar to most here, because it is to be found in the Ep
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
fast at 56 Green Street. who says, If your rambles lead you to the West of England, come and see me at Combe Florey, Taunton, Somersetshire. Thus you see that there is ample store of means for passing an interesting two months, when you consider that I shall take the circuits, with all these. Mr. Justice Littledale Joseph Littledale, 1767-1842. He was appointed a judge of the King's Bench in 1824, and resigned in 1841. His distinction is confined to the law. Sumner dined with him in Dec., 1838. is a good old man, simple and kind, but without any particular sagacity. Patteson, who appears to stand next after Baron Parke in point of judicial reputation, is still young, John Patteson, 1790-1861. He was made a judge of the King's Bench in 1830; resigned on account of deafness in 1852, and sat five years after his resignation on the judicial committee of the Privy Council. His second wife was the sister of his colleague, Sir John Taylor Coleridge. See reference to him in Life
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. Letters To George S. Hillard, Boston. London, Nov. 4, 1838. my dear Hillard,—I do not delay one moment to acknowledge the receipt of your touching letter, communicating the intelligence of the death of your dear child. Hillard's only child, a boy of two years, died after a brief illness the previous September. Would that these lines could go to you as swiftly as my sympatD'Oyly, where were Mr. Justice Littledale, Mr. Serjeant Taddy, and Mr. Impey; and to-night, if my cold will let me go out, with Bingham, Peregrine Bingham, author of Treatise on the Law of Infancy and Coverture. He invited Sumner to dine in Dec., 1838, at 34 Mecklenburgh Square; and on another occasion when Charles Austin was to be his guest. the reporter,—a most able man, and friend of Jeremy Bentham,—to meet Austin and some of the philosophical Radicals; to-morrow with Talbot,
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