hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Paine, John Knowles 1839- (search)
Paine, John Knowles 1839- Musician; born in Portland, Me., Jan. 9, 1839; studied music in Germany; appointed Professor of Music at Harvard in 1872. He is the author of the music which was sung at the opening of the World's Fair of 1876, and also of the march and hymn for the World's Fair of 1893, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whitside, Samuel Marmaduke 1839- (search)
Whitside, Samuel Marmaduke 1839- Military officer; born in Toronto, Canada, Jan. 9, 1839; joined the United States army in 1858; served throughout the Civil War with the 6th Cavalry; was then assigned to duty on the frontier, where he served for twenty-five years. In December, 1890, he captured Big Foot and his 400 Sioux warriors, and led his regiment at the battle of Wounded Knee. During the war with Spain he commanded the 5th Cavalry; was transferred to the 10th Cavalry in October, 1898; and went to Cuba in May, 1899, where he was placed in command of the Department of Santiago and Puerto Principe in January, 1900. On the reorganization of the regular army, in 1901, he was promoted brigadier-general.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
g Wortley hand down Lady Coltman, though there were at table Baron Parke, Vaughan, and Sir Edward Curry. This was strictly correct according to the Heralds' books, as the son of a peer takes precedence of knights, whatever may be their respective ages; but it shocked my notions of propriety. Dec. 14, 1838. Poor Allan Park is dead; and everybody is speculating about his successor. The Solicitor-General will be the man. Park died Dec. 8. Thomas Erskine (not Rolfe) was appointed, Jan. 9, 1839, his successor. Rolfe was appointed a baron of the Exchequer in Nov., 1839. Post, p. 52. I dined last night with Serjeant Wilde, and it was amusing to see the coquetry between him, Talfourd, Bompas, and Hill, with regard to the successor. I came up yesterday from Oxford, where I have passed four delightful days. I was installed by Sir Charles Vaughan as an honorary Fellow of All Souls. I have now given you the Queen's Bench and the Common Pleas judges. I shall follow this with the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Dec. 14, 1838. (search)
Dec. 14, 1838. Poor Allan Park is dead; and everybody is speculating about his successor. The Solicitor-General will be the man. Park died Dec. 8. Thomas Erskine (not Rolfe) was appointed, Jan. 9, 1839, his successor. Rolfe was appointed a baron of the Exchequer in Nov., 1839. Post, p. 52. I dined last night with Serjeant Wilde, and it was amusing to see the coquetry between him, Talfourd, Bompas, and Hill, with regard to the successor. I came up yesterday from Oxford, where I have passed four delightful days. I was installed by Sir Charles Vaughan as an honorary Fellow of All Souls. I have now given you the Queen's Bench and the Common Pleas judges. I shall follow this with the barons of the Exchequer; and then with a view of the common law bar. Afterwards you may expect something about the Chancery Bar and Admiralty. I have read Sir Mathew Hale's Ms. on the Admiralty, and find it to be a complete treatise on the subject, which contains nothing new to you, but which,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ds to America. Believe me ever very sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. To Judge Story. London, Jan. 23, 1839. my dear Judge,—In my notes about the judges, I broke off without giving you the barons of the Exchequer. The successor of Allan Park has at last been appointed; it is the Right Honorable T. Erskine, the Chief Judge of the Bankruptcy Court. Thomas Erskine, 1788-1864. He became Chief-Justice of the Court of Review in Bankruptcy in 1831, and a judge of the Common Pleas, Jan. 9, 1839,—resigning the latter office in 1844, on account of ill health. It so happened that I dined in company with Mr. Erskine at Baron Alderson's the day of his appointment. He is a very quiet, modest, and gentlemanly person; and these qualities, united to the great name he bears (he is the second son of the Erskine), make his appointment quite acceptable to the bar,—though they do not generally regard him as an addition to the strength of the bench; and his promotion does not devolve more bu<