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when I tell you that the short space it took me to read your last letter gave me more pleasure than the total sum of all I have enjoyed since that fatal first of January, 1841. Since then it seems to me I should have been entirely happy but for the never-absent idea that there is one still unhappy whom I have contributed to mak and desiring to do Mary Todd a kindly act, determined to bring about a reconciliation. She knew that Miss Todd had by letter a few days after that fatal first of January, 1841, as Lincoln styled it, released him from the engagement, and that since then their relations had been strained, if not entirely broken off. As she viewed i, introspectively, thoroughly; he knew he did not love her, but he had promised to marry her! The hideous thought came up like a nightmare. As the fatal first of January, 1841, neared, the clouds around him blackened the heavens and his life almost went out with the storm. But soon the skies cleared. Friends interposed their ai
It cannot be told how it now thrills me with joy to hear you say you are far happier than you ever expected to be. That much, I know, is enough. I know you too well to suppose your expectations were not, at least, sometimes extravagant; and if the reality exceeds them all, I say, Enough, dear Lord. I am not going beyond the truth when I tell you that the short space it took me to read your last letter gave me more pleasure than the total sum of all I have enjoyed since the fatal first of January, 1841. Since then it seems to me I should have been entirely happy, but for the neverabsent idea that there is one still unhappy whom I have contributed to make so. That still kills my soul. I cannot but reproach myself for even wishing to be happy while she is otherwise. It is quite possible that a series of incidents that occurred during the summer in which the above was written had something to do with bringing such a frame of mind to a happier conclusion. James Shields, afterwar
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McBryde, John McLaren 1841- (search)
McBryde, John McLaren 1841- Educator; born in Abbeville, S. C., Jan. 1, 1841; graduated at the University of Virginia in 1860. He served in the Confederate army till 1863, when he was transferred to the Confederate Treasury Department. At the close of the war he engaged in farming in Virginia. In 1879-82 he was Professor of Botany and Agriculture in the University of Tennessee; and in 1883-87 Professor of Botany and president of the South Carolina College. He then became president of the University of South Carolina and director of the South Carolina agricultural experiment station. In 1891 he was chosen president of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and director of the Virginia agricultural experiment station.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
organization was imposed upon him from the start, and this, of course, involved a special vindication of its leader—a task made doubly difficult after Colver's slanders had been Ante, 2.429. industriously put in circulation under the official cover of the Lib. 11.174; Ms. Mar. 2, 1841, Collins to E. Quincy. Executive Committee of the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society. The Sabbath [Chardon-Street] Convention, wrote Collins to Mr. Garrison, from Ipswich, the home of Clarkson, on January 1, 1841, has completely changed the issue. Woman's rights and non-governmentism are quite respectable when compared to your religious views. Ms. In a recent interview, procured with much difficulty, and only in an unofficial capacity, with Clarkson, his family were unwilling to have Collins touch on the subject of the division among the American abolitionists. Allusion to this or to Mr. Garrison led the venerable philanthropist to speak of the evils resulting from destroying the Sabbath or
55 In many places at the great fire, great damage, Nov. 10, 1872 Building on Lagrange street destroyed, five killed, May 26, 1875 On Federal street bridge, four men killed, Dec. 22, 1875 Gibbeted Two pirates, on Bird Island, hung in chains, May 3, 1724 The Pirate Fly, on Nix's Mate, hung in chains, July 2, 1726 Giants Rose Richardson, age eight, weight 500 lbs., at Concert Hall, March, 1834 Charles Freeman, seven feet, three inches high, at the National Theatre, Jan. 1, 1841 A monster Quaker, and Lady, at Amory Hall, July, 1849 Gold at 3 per cent. premium, Jan. 1, 1862 At 21 per cent. premium, Aug. 1, 1862 At 49 per cent. premium, Jan. 1, 1863 At 71 per cent. premium, Mar. 1, 1863 At 28 per cent. premium, Aug. 1, 1863 At 48 per cent. premium, Nov. 1, 1863 Gold at 61 per cent. premium, Mar. 1, 1864 At 90 per cent. premium, June 1, 1864 At 154 per cent. premium, July 1, 1864 At 194 per cent. premium, Sep. 1, 1864 At 1