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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 2: birth.-career as officer of Engineers, United States army. (search)
luding non-combatants, Mexicans, and children, because the assault would have to be made in the dark, and the assailants dare not lose time in taking or guarding prisoners without incurring the certainty of becoming captives themselves, until all the strongholds of the place had been captured. The council determined upon a siege. In two weeks the army and navy were ready to open fire, and one week's bombardment resulted in the capitulation of Vera Cruz, and the adjacent forts on the 29th of March, 1847. In the preparatory two weeks Lee spent nights and days in incessant labor, and his enterprise, endurance, energy, and intelligent arrangement of all the necessary details of the siege were most conspicuous, and to him has been ascribed much credit for the victory. At Vera Cruz Captain Lee met his brother, Lieutenant Sydney Smith Lee, of the United States Navy, and the soldier and sailor fought together. In a letter written from Vera Cruz at the time, after describing a battery
e too few, in comparison with our need of such aid. Had their number been fourfold greater, there is no doubt the labors of the army would have been materially lessened and the result expedited. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jos. G. Totten, Colonel and Chief Engineers. Major-General W. Scott, Commanding the Army of the United States, Mexico, The city of Vera Cruz and Castle of San Juan d'ulloa were surrendered to the American forces on the 29th day of March, 1847, the articles of capitulation having been signed two days before. On the 8th of April, the army, with the exception of a regiment of infantry left behind to serve as a garrison, began its march into the interior, numbering in all about eight thousand five hundred men. They were soon made to feel that their path of progress was not without difficulties and dangers. At Cerro Gordo, sixty miles from Vera Cruz, a Mexican army, thirty-five thousand strong, under the command of General S
, but exchanged in 1813, fought in the battle of Lundy's Lane, and was severely wounded. After the close of the war he was raised to the rank of major-general, and in 1841 succeeded General Macomb as commander of the United States army. In the war with Mexico, he won great fame and was nominated by the Whigs for President in 1852; but he carried only four States. In 1855, Congress revived the rank of lieutenant-general and conferred it by brevet upon Scott, the appointment being dated March 29, 1847, the day of his brilliant capture of Vera Cruz. It was evident that his age and infirmities would prevent his taking any active part in the Civil War, and on November 1, 1861, he was retired from the chief command of the army of the United States. He wrote an autobiography, and made a European trip in 1864, dying May 29, 1866, at West Point, New York. Major-General Henry Wager Halleck ´╝łU. S.M. A. 1839) was born in Westernville, New York, January 16, 1815. He served in California
plications. It is, of course, understood that in most cases the actual rank next below that conferred by brevet was held either in the United States Army or the Volunteers. In some cases for distinguished gallantry or marked efficiency brevet rank higher than the next grade above was given. The date is that of the appointment. Lieutenant-General, United States army (full rank) Grant, Ulysses S., Mar. 2, 1864. Lieutenant-General, United States army (by Brevet) Scott, Winfield, Mar. 29, 1847. Major-generals, United States army (full rank) Fremont, J. C., May 14, 1861. Halleck, H. W., Aug. 19, 1861. Hancock, Winfield, July 26, 1866. McClellan, G. B., May 14, 1861. Meade, G. G., Aug. 18, 1864. Sheridan, P. H., Nov. 8, 1864. Sherman, Wm. T., Aug. 12, 1864. Thomas, Geo. H., Dec. 15, 1864. Wool, John E., May 16, 1862. Major-generals, United States army (by Brevet) Allen, Robert, Mar. 13, 1865. Ames, Adelbert, Mar. 13, 1865. Anderson, Robert, Feb. 3, 1865. Arn
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
., fought......Jan. 8, 1847 Congress authorizes ten additional regiments for the regular army......Feb. 11, 1847 Battle of Buena Vista......Feb. 22-23, 1847 Battle of Sacramento......Feb. 28, 1847 Congress resolves to light with gas the Capitol and Capitol grounds......March 3, 1847 Twenty-ninth Congress adjourns......March 3, 1847 General Scott lands at Vera Cruz, Mexico, with 13,000 men......March 9, 1847 Vera Cruz surrenders after a bombardment of nine days......March 29, 1847 Army moves from Vera Cruz towards the city of Mexico under General Twiggs......April 8, 1847 Battle of Cerro Gordo......April 18, 1847 Army enters Puebla......May 15, 1847 President Polk visits the Eastern States as far as Augusta, Me., and returns to Washington......July 7, 1847 Battles of Contreras and Churubusco......Aug. 20, 1847 Armistice granted the Mexicans by General Scott......from Aug. 21 to Sept. 7, 1847 Salt Lake City founded by the Mormons......1847 B
1791. He d. at Brighton 8 May 1807; his w. Elizabeth d. at Rutland 14 Jan. 1821, a. 75. 10. Josiah, s. of Thomas (9), m. Isabella Winship 31 Mar. 1789, and had Isabella, b. 29 Dec. 1789, m. William Leathe 4 July 1811, and d. 9 Aug. 1875. Josiah the f. was a merchant, and innholder in early life, but for many years cultivated a few acres in Cambridgeport. His w. Isabella d. 24 Nov. 1821, a. 52, and he m. Mrs. Mary Forbes in 1822, and Mrs. Elizabeth Greenwood of Boston in 1838; he d. 29 Mar. 1847. 11. Thomas, s. of Thomas (9), m. Elizabeth Seaver 22 Sept. 1793; he was a blacksmith, and resided near the easterly corner of Main and Douglass streets for several years after 1801, but I find no record here of his family. He rem. to Newton and was killed by a load of lumber passing over his body 19 Nov. 1829. 12. James, s. of Thomas (9), m. Nancy Wilson 11 Nov. 1794, and had William B., b. 3 Sept. 1795; Abigail, b. 27 July 1797; Eleanor, b. 5 Oct. 1803, d. 6 Oct. 1803; Martha T.,
1791. He d. at Brighton 8 May 1807; his w. Elizabeth d. at Rutland 14 Jan. 1821, a. 75. 10. Josiah, s. of Thomas (9), m. Isabella Winship 31 Mar. 1789, and had Isabella, b. 29 Dec. 1789, m. William Leathe 4 July 1811, and d. 9 Aug. 1875. Josiah the f. was a merchant, and innholder in early life, but for many years cultivated a few acres in Cambridgeport. His w. Isabella d. 24 Nov. 1821, a. 52, and he m. Mrs. Mary Forbes in 1822, and Mrs. Elizabeth Greenwood of Boston in 1838; he d. 29 Mar. 1847. 11. Thomas, s. of Thomas (9), m. Elizabeth Seaver 22 Sept. 1793; he was a blacksmith, and resided near the easterly corner of Main and Douglass streets for several years after 1801, but I find no record here of his family. He rem. to Newton and was killed by a load of lumber passing over his body 19 Nov. 1829. 12. James, s. of Thomas (9), m. Nancy Wilson 11 Nov. 1794, and had William B., b. 3 Sept. 1795; Abigail, b. 27 July 1797; Eleanor, b. 5 Oct. 1803, d. 6 Oct. 1803; Martha T.,
Mercury says of Gen. Benjamin Hager, who has recently been placed in command of the Virginia forces at Norfolk: Gen. Hager his had all the advantages of a fist rite military education. Having entered the West Point Academy as a cadet in 1821, be graduated in June, 1825, and was detailed for service us Brevet Second Lieutenant, 3d Artillery 1st July of the same year, was made Captain of Ordnance 30th May, 1832--At the opening of hostilities with Mexico he was attached to Gen. Scott's Staff, as Chief of Ordnance of the Army in Mexico. For "gallant and meritorious conduct at the sere of Vera Cruz," 29th March, 1847, he was breveted Major. At the battle of Ed Molinadel Rev. he was breveted Lieutenant Colonel, for "gallant and meritorious conduct," 8th September, 1847. Again, on the bloody field of Caurubauses, 13th September, 1847, he was breveted Colonel, for his services. It is thought as soon as the Maryland Brigade is complete, he will assume the command at their request.