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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
io, while Mr. Charles Francis Adams, and his friend, Charles Sumner, were putting forth their mightiest efforts to restore to the old Commonwealth of Massachusetts Bay the spirit of liberty, whose beacon-fires had long ago begun to grow dim. There was a general disposition, through many portions of the North, to throw off despotism of party; and with a view to unite men of all parties against the future encroachments of slavery, a mass Convention was called, to meet at Worcester on the 28th of June, 1848. In that convention, Mr. Charles Francis Adams, Mr. Giddings, and Mr. Sumner were the chief speakers, and the leading spirits. Before Mr. Sumner spoke, Charles Francis Adams, after showing how basely the Whig Party had prostituted itself to the behests of slavery, closed with the following stirring words: The only thing to be done by all under such circumstances, is what as one, individually, I have made up my mind to do, that is—to have nothing more to do with it. Hereafter, the
io, while Mr. Charles Francis Adams, and his friend, Charles Sumner, were putting forth their mightiest efforts to restore to the old Commonwealth of Massachusetts Bay the spirit of liberty, whose beacon-fires had long ago begun to grow dim. There was a general disposition, through many portions of the North, to throw off despotism of party; and with a view to unite men of all parties against the future encroachments of slavery, a mass Convention was called, to meet at Worcester on the 28th of June, 1848. In that convention, Mr. Charles Francis Adams, Mr. Giddings, and Mr. Sumner were the chief speakers, and the leading spirits. Before Mr. Sumner spoke, Charles Francis Adams, after showing how basely the Whig Party had prostituted itself to the behests of slavery, closed with the following stirring words: The only thing to be done by all under such circumstances, is what as one, individually, I have made up my mind to do, that is—to have nothing more to do with it. Hereafter, the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
icy relating to the tariff and a national bank, which drew to them more than to any party in our history capitalists, large manufacturers, men of acquired fortune, he expressed no sympathy. One of his type of mind would be inspired with party enthusiasm only where the primary convictions of right and duty were the basis of political doctrine and action. I was a Whig because I thought this party represented the moral sentiments of the country,—that it was the party of Humanity. Speech, June 28, 1848. His letters to friends and his published communications on the Right of Search and the Creole case show that, among the political questions of the day, those relating to Slavery were then uppermost in his thoughts. There were some points aside from their distinctive measures in which the Whigs came nearer to his views than their opponents. While at this time refusing as a national party to take an antislavery position, they were less than the Democrats under the control of the slave
ul's Church, Tremont street, built, 1820 Under Park street Church, Park street, built, 1823 Interments under Churches discontinued, 1862 At Mount Auburn, Cambridge, consecrated, Aug. 16, 1831 At Forest Hills, Roxbury, consecrated, June 28, 1848 At Woodlawn, Chelsea, consecrated, July 2, 1851 At Mount Hope, Roxbury, consecrated, June 24, 1852 See Burial Grounds. Century the nineteenth said to end to-day, Aug. 31, 1867 Hill, afterwards called Beacon Hill, 1634 Celarged), in Mt. Vernon avenue, Oct. 22, 1845 David Estes, watchman, by unknown, in Sister street, Apr. 27, 1848 Ellen Oakes, by Augustus Dutee, in Hanover street, Apr. 27, 1848 Thomas Harding, by Washington Goode, in Richmond street, June 28, 1848 George Parkman, by John W. Webster, in Grove street, Nov. 23, 1849 Charles Smith, by James McNulty, in Merrimac street, May 26, 1851 Mrs. Van Wagner, by Thomas Davis, in Charter street, Oct. 19, 1851 Mrs. McGee, by James McGee, in