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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 2 2 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 1 1 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 1 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 1 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 1 1 Browse Search
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attle of Perryville, while gallantly fighting for his country, poor Terrill was killed. My suspension necessitated my leaving the Academy, and I returned home in the fall of 1851, much crestfallen. Fortunately, my good friend Henry Dittoe again gave me employment in keeping the books of his establishment, and this occupation of my time made the nine months which were to elapse before I could go back to West Point pass much more agreeably than they would have done had I been idle. In August, 1852, I joined the first class at the Academy in accordance with the order of the War Department, taking my place at the foot of the class and graduating with it the succeeding June, number thirty-four in a membership of fifty-two. At the head of this class graduated James B. McPherson, who was killed in the Atlanta campaign while commanding the Army of the Tennessee. It also contained such men as John M. Schofield, who commanded the Army of the Ohio; Joshua W. Sill, killed as a brigadier in
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 3 (search)
been executed for light-houses on the coast of England, so that splendid examples had been afforded of the possibilities of light-house construction in various localities. But the Light-House Board of the United States was not organized until August, 1852, so at the period when Lieutenant Meade took charge of the construction of the Carysfort Reef light-house he entered upon the work under the direction of the chief of his corps, Colonel Abert, to help acquire, not to benefit by, the experience structures, originating in popular misapprehension of the differences between the construction and the sites, respectively, of Carysfort Reef, Florida, and Minot's Ledge, Massachusetts, where a light-house had been destroyed in a storm. In August, 1852, we find him, upon a requisition from the Light-House Board, supplying information regarding the Florida lighthouses at Carysfort Reef and Sand Key and the Sand Key light-ship. In answer to a request conveyed through the secretary of the Ligh
began to make its way, and it sold at the rate of 1,000 per week during July. In August the demand became very great, and went on increasing to the 20th, by which time it was perfectly overwhelming. We have now about 400 people employed in getting out the book, and seventeen printing machines besides hand presses. Already about 150,000 copies of the book are in the hands of the people, and still the returns of sales show no decline. The story was dramatized in the United States in August, 1852, without the consent or knowledge of the author, who had neglected to reserve her rights for this purpose. In September of the same year we find it announced as the attraction at two London theatres, namely, the Royal Victoria and the Great National Standard. In 1853 Professor Stowe writes: The drama of Uncle Tom has been going on in the National Theatre of New York all summer with most unparalleled success. Everybody goes night after night, and nothing can stop it. The enthusia
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 8 (search)
return my own brother or sister into bondage, as I would return a fugitive slave. Before God, and Christ, and all Christian men, they are my brothers and sisters. What a condition! from the lips, too, of a champion of the Higher Law! Whether the States be separate or united, neither my brother nor any other man's brother shall, with my consent, go back to bondage. [Enthusiastic cheers.] So speaks the heart,--Mr. Mann's version is that of the politician. Mr. Mann's recent speech in August, 1852, has the same non-committal tone to which I have alluded in Mr. Sumner's. While professing, in the most eloquent terms, his loyalty to the Higher Law, Mr. Sutherland asked: Is there, in Mr. Mann's opinion, any conflict between that Higher Law and the Constitution? If so, what is it? If not so, why introduce an irrelevant topic into the debate? Mr. Mann avoided any reply, and asked not to be interrupted! Is that the frankness which becomes an Abolitionist? Can such concealment help a
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 2: the Worcester period (search)
saw him at Wendell's planning with us to mount guard, and then turning to pretty Phoebe-- to arrange little plans to keep everybody still and spare Mrs. P.'s nerves, I thought to myself that the adopted daughter might prove the next attraction, and now it turns out they are engaged. He is tall, erect, strong, blond, Saxon, and she a brunette with lovely eyes and a Welsh smile — you know her mother was Welsh; they will be a picturesque couple, and it is quite a chivalrous little affair. August, 1852 Dearest Mother: The difference between Perry--, of Worcester . . and his brother . . . Elijah is that Elijah not only is insane, but is thought so. Perry is round and rosy; Elijah is tall, straight, with a fine face, and a taste for walking the streets with his hat off, declaiming loudly. He has travelled a great deal and can take excellent care of himself and property. His last visit was to Rome to convert the Pope; he is himself a devout Catholic, but has some peculiar views on pe
be pressed upon your consideration. The case of millions deprived of personal liberty, and subjected to Letter to Kossuth, p. 57. all the mutations of property, is too distinct and too awful to be put into the same category with the question of tariff, or free trade, or the extension of suffrage, or the distribution of the public lands, The Homestead Bill was now looming up as an issue between North and South. Passed by the House of Representatives, it was rejected by the Senate in August, 1852, as an abolition measure (Lib. 22: 141). or social reorganization, or national independence, or non-intervention, or any other question relating to individual advancement or the general welfare. In every land, men differ—widely and honestly differ—in their views respecting the science of political economy and the best form of government, whether for transient or permanent adoption. But as to chattelizing those upon whom the Creator has stamped his own image, the same verdict has always
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Eminent women of the drama. (search)
her's management. New parts were found for them from time to time. Kate used to be especially fine as Richard the Third, which she was first cast in at the suggestion of Moses Kimball, in the old days of the Boston Museum, which institution he originated. Her best part, though, was Henriette de Vigny, in The young couple. In 1850 the Bateman Children were taken to England, where, in all the great cities of the British Isles, they found even more favor than they had found at home. In August, 1852, they returned to America, and in 1856 they retired from the stage. Ellen was subsequently married and is now Mrs. Claude Greppo. Kate remained in retirement and studied acting. At length, in 1860, she reappeared on the stage, in the character of Evangeline, in a drama, by her mother, based on Longfellow's poem. The performance, though very pretty and pleasing, did not, however, make a deep impression upon the public mind. It was seen in many American cities, during the season of 186