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Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., First joint debate, at Ottawa, August 21, 1858. (search)
litionism in its milder and lighter form, and trying to Abolitionize the Democratic party, and bring old Democrats handcuffed and bound hand and foot into the Abolition camp. In pursuance of the arrangement, the parties met at Springfield in October, 1854, and proclaimed their new platform. Lincoln was to bring into the Abolition camp the old line Whigs and transfer them over to Giddings Chase, Fred. Douglass, and Parson Lovejoy who were ready to receive them and christen them in their new frched in the moment Lincoln got through, and gave notice that they did not want to hear me, and would proceed with the business of the Convention. Still another fact. I have here a newspaper printed at Springfield Mr. Lincoln's own town, in October, 1854, a few days afterward, publishing these resolutions, charging Mr. Lincoln with entertaining these sentiments, and trying to prove that they were also the sentiments of Mr. Yates, then candidate for Congress. This has been published on Mr. Li
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Second joint debate, at Freeport, August 27, 1858. (search)
r of acquiescing in, adopting and following such decision as a rule of political action? Q. 4. Are you in favor of acquiring additional territory, in disregard of how such acquisition may affect the nation on the slavery question? As introductory to these interrogatories which Judge Douglas propounded to me at Ottawa, he read a set of resolutions which he said Judge Trumbull and myself had participated in adopting in the first Republican State Convention, held at Springfield, in October, 1854. He insisted that I and Judge Trumbull, and perhaps the entire Republican party, were responsible for the doctrines contained in the set of resolutions which he read, and I understand that it was from that set of resolutions that he deduced the interrogatories which he propounded to me, using these resolutions as a sort of authority for propounding those questions to me. Now I say here to-day that I do not answer his interrogatories because of their springing at all from that set of res
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Fifth joint debate, at Galesburgh, October 7, 1858. (search)
there is an unholy and unnatural alliance between the Republican and the National Democrats, I now want to enter my protest against receiving him as an entirely competent witness upon that subject. I want to call to the Judge's attention an attack he made upon me in the first one of these debates, at Ottawa, on the 21st of August. In order to fix extreme Abolitionism upon me, Judge Douglas read a set of resolutions which he declared had been passed by a Republican State Convention, in October, 1854, at Springfield, Illinois, and he declared I had taken part in that Convention. It turned out that although a few men calling themselves an anti-Nebraska State Convention had sat at Springfield about that time, yet neither did I take any part in it, nor did it pass the resolutions or any such resolutions as Judge Douglas read. So apparent had it become that the resolutions which he read had not been passed at Springfield at all, nor by a State Convention in which I had taken part, that
result was an acquittal in every case under the instructions of the Court. The prosecutor never found out the dodge until the trials were over, and immense fun and rejoicing were indulged in at the result. The same gentleman who furnishes this last incident, and who was afterward a trusted friend of Mr. Lincoln, Henry C. Whitney, has described most happily the delights of a life on the circuit. A bit of it, referring to Lincoln, I apprehend, cannot be deemed out of place here. In October, 1854, Abraham Lincoln, he relates, drove into our town (Urbana) to attend court. He had the appearance of a rough, intelligent farmer, and his rude, homemade buggy and raw-boned horse enforced this belief. I had met him for the first time in June of the same year. David Davis and Leonard Swett had just preceded him. The next morning he started North, on the Illinois Central Railroad, and as he went in an old omnibus he played on a boy's harp all the way to the depot. I used to attend the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 8.70 (search)
nearly all the cadet offices up to the rank of cavalry sergeant and second captain; and graduated thirteenth in a class of forty-two. He was immediately commissioned brevet second lieutenant in the regiment of Mounted Rifles then serving in Texas, but owing to the prevalence of the Yellow fever in New Orleans was unable to join his regiment until December of that year, when he was engaged in the expedition against the Apachee Indians, which was commanded by Major John S. Simonson. In October, 1854, he was promoted to be second lieutenant in the Mounted Rifles, and in May, 1855, was transferred, with the same rank, to the First Cavalry regiment, which was organized at Jefferson Barracks, near St. Louis, and was afterwards moved to Fort Leavenworth, at which post Stuart was appointed regimental quartermaster and commissary. In September and October of this year, the First Cavalry was engaged in an expedition against the Indians which entailed severe marching but no fighting. Retur
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861 (search)
d that Trumbull should have my seat when my term expired. Lincoln went to work to abolitionize the Old Whig party all over the State, pretending that he was then as good a Whig as ever; and Trumbull went to work in his part of the State preaching abolitionism in its milder and lighter form, and trying to abolitionize the Democratic party, and bring old Democrats handcuffed and bound hand and foot into the abolition camp. In pursuance of the arrangement the parties met at Springfield in October, 1854, and proclaimed their new platform. Lincoln was to bring into the abolition camp the old-line Whigs, and transfer them over to Giddings, Chase, Fred Douglass, and Par- Monument to Stephen A. Douglas. son Lovejoy, who were ready to receive them and christen them in their new faith. They laid down on that occasion a platform for their new Republican party, which was thus to be constructed. I have the resolutions of the State convention then held, which was the first mass State conven
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
and, and put a mark upon it for the purpose of establishing a sort of pre-emption title to it, and at a public meeting resolved, That we will afford protection to no abolitionist as a settler of this Territory; that we recognize the institution of slavery as already existing in this Territory, and ad- Street scene, Wichita. vise slave-holders to introduce their property as soon as possible. The national government appointed A. H. Reeder governor of the new Territory. He arrived in October, 1854, and took measures for the election of a territorial legislature. With the close of this election (March, 1855), the struggle for supremacy in Kansas between the friends and opponents of the slave system began in dead earnest. The pro-slavery men had an overwhelming majority in the legislature, for Missourians had gone over the border by hundreds and voted. When, in November, 1854, a delegate to Congress for Kansas was elected, of nearly 2,900 votes cast, over 1,700 were put in by Mis
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
d, pro-slavery, printed under an elm-tree on the levee at Leavenworth......Sept. 15, 1854 Atchison laid out by an association from Platte county, Mo., and first sale of lots takes place......Sept. 21, 1854 Samuel D. Lecompte, of Maryland, commissioned chief-justice......Oct. 3, 1854 Andrew H. Reeder, of Pennsylvania, appointed governor, arrives in the Territory......Oct. 7, 1854 Secret societies called Blue Lodges begin in Weston, Mo., for extending slavery into Kansas......October, 1854 Election as territorial delegate to Congress of J. W. Whitfield, pro-slavery, by illegal votes......Nov. 29, 1854 Topeka founded......Dec. 5, 1854 A free-State meeting at Lawrence......Dec. 23, 1854 Wyandotte Indians cede to the United States lands purchased by them from the Delawares in Kansas in 1843......Jan. 31, 1855 First census completed: total, 8,501; voters, 2,905; slaves, 192......Feb. 28, 1855 Five sons of old John Brown settle on the Pottawattomie, near Osawatom
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 38: repeal of the Missouri Compromise.—reply to Butler and Mason.—the Republican Party.—address on Granville Sharp.—friendly correspondence.—1853-1854. (search)
d slave-trade, and I must confess that this is logical. If slavery be a good, as is represented, we ought to help more Africans to its blessings. In secret session of the Senate, I was able to stop a proposition to withdraw our African squadron and place it on the coast of Cuba. But the effort will be made again at the next session, and again I shall oppose it. The portentous question now is connected with Cuba. Buchanan, Mason. and Soule, under instructions from Pierce, met in October, 1854, at Ostend and Aix-la-Chapelle, to plot for the acquisition of Cuba, and issued the famous Ostend Manifesto. To secure that island money to any amount will be lavished, and war will be braved. This Administration is a cross between the pirate and the scorpion, and I shall not be surprised by any audacity. At present we have grand omens. The elections show that the Congress which will come together a year from now will be strongly antislavery. The danger now is that the Administration
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 27: recently. (search)
contrivances, may be made to concentrate or ward off the rays of the sun. Irrigation and drainage go far to complete the farmer's independence of the wayward weather. In all the operations of his little farm, Mr. Greeley takes the liveliest interest, and he means to astonish his neighbors with some wonderful crops, by-and-bye, when he has everything in training. Indeed, he may have done so already; as, in the list of prizes awarded at our last Agricultural State Fair, held in New York, October, 1854, we read, under the head of vegetables, these two items:—Turnips, H. Greeley, Chappaqua, Westchester Co., Two Dollars, (the second prize); Twelve second-best ears of White Seed Corn, H. Greeley, Two Dollars. Looking down over the reclaimed swamp, all bright now with waving flax, he said one day, All else that I have done may be of no avail; but what I have done here is done; it will last. A private letter, written about this time, appeared in the country papers, and still emerges occ
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