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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 1 1 Browse Search
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n to barrel. 1. Sliding Longitudinally Backward. (a.) Operated by a Lever. No.Name.Date. 747W. JenksMay 25, 1838. 7,443W. W. MarstonJune 18, 1850. *8,317H. SmithAug. 26, 1851. *10,535Smith and WessonFeb. 14, 1854. 15,995G. W. MorseOct. 28, 1856. 16,797W. C. HicksMar. 10, 1857. 20,825G. H. SouleJuly 6, 1858. 20,954J. H. MerrillJuly 20, 1858. *30,446B. F. HenryOct. 16, 1860. 30,714J. BoyntonNov. 27, 1860. 32,032J. H. MerrillApr. 9, 1861. 32,033J. H. MerrillApr. 9, 1861. 32,451. 11,685H. W. AdamsSept 19, 1854. 12,681F. KleinApr. 10, 1855. 13,154E. AllenJuly 3, 1855. 5. (b.) Having Chamber in the Barrel in Front of Faucet.—Continued. No.Name.Date. 14,077J. H. MerrillJan. 8, 1856. 15,990T. A. WashingtonOct. 28, 1856. 113,194R. HenningerMar. 28, 1871. class C. — revolvers. [The dagger (†) signifies that the cylinder has a cartridge-shell extractor.] 1. Chambered Cylinder revolving on Parallel Axis. (a.) Behind a Barrel; Cylinder charged at Fr<
74. 153,449.Meyer, July 28, 1874. 153,450.Meyer, July 28, 1874. Coloring Vulcanite. 99,956.Schlesinger, Feb. 15, 1870.99,885.Halliday, Feb. 15, 1870. Vulcanite Articles. See patents:— No.Name and DatePurpose. 103,416.Bird et al., May 24, 1870Wringer-rolls, etc. 62,106.Albright, February 12, 1867Harness-trimmings. 77,952.Beins, May 19, 1868Car-springs. 140,519.Mayall, July 1, 1873Belting. Restoring Waste Rubber. See patents:— No.Name and Date. 15,998.Forstrick, Oct. 28, 1856. 122,289.Smyser, Dec. 26, 1871. 23,740.Bachnagel, Ap. 19, 1859. 25,160.Hall, August 16, 1859. 30,181.Parmalee, Sep. 25, 1860. 92,764.Tuttle, July 20, 1869. 17,295.Popenhausen et al., May 12, 1857. Vul′can-ite-flask. An iron box for holding a denture while being exposed to the heat of a vulcanizer. Vulcanizing flask. Flask for dental vulcanite-mold. The flask is formed in three parts. The teeth are set in the central part, and the others contain the dies for pressin<
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
To Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, October 28, 1856. Did you take note of T. W. Higginson's sermon to the people of Lawrence, in Kansas? His text was from the Prophet Nehemiah, commanding the people to fight for their wives, their children, and their homes. What a convenient book that Old Testament is, whenever there is any fighting to be done. Many people seem to be greatly shocked by Higginson's course; but if they admit that war is ever justifiable, I think they are inconsistent to blame him. If the heroes of ‘76 were praiseworthy, the heroes of Kansas will be more praiseworthy for maintaining their rights, even unto death. But, It is treason; it is revolution, they exclaim. They seem to forget that the war of ‘71G was precisely that. It was a contest with our own government, not with a foreign foe; and the wrongs to be redressed were not worthy of a thought in comparison with the accumulation of outrages upon the free settlers in Kansas. This battle with the overgrown slave
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
and a new projectile, having a saucer-shaped copper sabot attached by bolts after the shell was cast, was substituted for it. This shell, called the Mullane or Tennessee shell, was the invention of Dr. Read of Tuscaloosa, Ala., the well-known inventor of what are usually but improperly called Parrott shell. Parrott made the best guns adapted to these shell, and the gun properly goes by his name, but Dr. Read's invention of the shell cannot be questioned. His first patent was granted Oct. 28, 1856, and specifies cupped cylinders fastened on to the shell by screws, rivets, &c. A patent was refused the Mullane shell by the Confederate Patent Office, on the ground that it was anticipated by this patent of Dr. Read. The modifications and improvements on this shell, described further on, also all fell under Dr. Read's patent. This shell was a slight improvement on Burton's and Archer's, as it sometimes took the grooves and then its flight was excellent. It failed, however, about thre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery service. (search)
and a new projectile, having a saucer-shaped copper sabot attached by bolts after the shell was cast, was substituted for it. This shell, called the Mullane or Tennessee shell, was the invention of Dr. Read of Tuscaloosa, Ala., the well-known inventor of what are usually but improperly called Parrott shell. Parrott made the best guns adapted to these shell, and the gun properly goes by his name, but Dr. Read's invention of the shell cannot be questioned. His first patent was granted Oct. 28, 1856, and specifies cupped cylinders fastened on to the shell by screws, rivets, &c. A patent was refused the Mullane shell by the Confederate Patent Office, on the ground that it was anticipated by this patent of Dr. Read. The modifications and improvements on this shell, described further on, also all fell under Dr. Read's patent. This shell was a slight improvement on Burton's and Archer's, as it sometimes took the grooves and then its flight was excellent. It failed, however, about thre