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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Breckinridge, John Cabell, -1875 (search)
Breckinridge, John Cabell, -1875 Statesman; born near Lexington, Ky., Jan. 21, John Cabell Breckinridge. 1821. Studying law at the Transylvania Institute, he began its practice at Lexington. He served as major in the war with Mexico; was a member of his State legislature; and from 1851 to 1855 was in Congress. President Pierce tendered him the mission to Spain, which he declined. In March, 1857, he became Vice-President, under Buchanan, and succeeded John J. Crittenden in the Senate of the United States in 1861. He was then a defeated candidate for the Presidency. His friendship for the Confederates caused his expulsion from the Senate in December, 1861, when he joined the Confederate army and was made a major-general, Aug. 5, 1862. He was active at various points during the remainder of the war. Breckinridge was Secretary of War of the Confederacy when it fell (1865), and soon afterwards departed for Europe, returning to his native State in a short time. He was the you
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
erm beginsSept. 19, 1820 Frederick Batesterm beginsNov., 1824 Abraham J. WilliamsactingAug. 1, 1825 Gen. John Millerterm beginsNov., 1825 Daniel Dunklinterm beginsNov., 1832 Lilburn W. Boggsterm beginsNov., 1836 Thomas Reynolds (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1840 M. M. MarmadukeactingFeb. 9, 1844 John C. Edwards (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1844 Austin A. King (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1848 Sterling Price (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1852 Trusten Polk (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1856 Hancock JacksonactingMarch, 1857 Robert M. Stewart (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1857 Claiborne F. Jackson (Dem.)term beginsJan. 4, 1861 H. R. Gamble (provisional)electedJuly 31, 1861 Willard P. HallactingJan. 31, 1864 Thomas C. Fletcher (Rep.)term beginsJan. 31, 1865 Joseph W. McClurg (Rep.)term beginsJan. 31, 1869 R. Gratz Brown (Lib.)term beginsJan. 31, 1871 Silas Woodson (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1873 Charles H. Hardin (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1875 John S. Phelps (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1877 Thos. T. Crittende
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
......Aug. 14, 1848 First session adjourns......Aug. 14, 1848 Sixteenth Presidential election......Nov. 7, 1848 Second session assembles......Dec. 4, 1848 First gold from California (1,804.59 ounces troy, average value per ounce, $18.05 1/2) deposited at the United States mint by David Carter......Dec. 8, 1848 Postal treaty with Great Britain......Dec. 15, 1848 Electoral votes counted......Feb. 14, 1849 Act granting swamp lands to the State of Louisiana, approved (see March, 1857)......March 2, 1849 Territorial government of Minnesota established by act approved......March 3, 1849 Coinage of the gold dollar and doubleeagle authorized......March 3, 1849 Department of Interior created by act approved......March 3, 1849 Work of census office, previously under Secretary of State, transferred to the Interior by act......March 3, 1849 Thirtieth Congress adjourns......March 3, 1849 sixteenth administration—Whig, March 5, 1849, to March 3, 1853. Zacha
souri Railroad, now the Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific......Sept. 1, 1853 Iowa Wesleyan University at Mount Pleasant chartered and opened......1855 Corner-stone of the first railroad bridge over the Mississippi River, between Rock Island and Davenport, lard Sept. 1. 1854; and first locomotive, the Des Moines, to cross the Mississippi passes over......April 21, 1856 Massacre of white settlers at Spirit Lake by a predatory band of Indians under the Sioux chief Ink-pa-duta......March, 1857 Constitutional convention meets at Iowa City Jan. 19, 1857, completes its labors March 6, 1857; constitution ratified by the people, 40,311 to 38,681.Aug. 3, 1857 State capital removed to Des Moines......1857 State University of Iowa at Iowa City, chartered 1847, opened, Silas Totten president......1860 Legislature votes a war loan of $600,000......June, 1861 Upper Iowa University at Fayette, opened 1857, chartered......1862 James Harlan appointed Secretary of the Interi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Minnesota, (search)
t. Peter passes the House, but the council is dissolved without acting on the bill......1857 Inkpadootah, a Dakota Indian, at the head of a band, massacres a settlement of whites at Springfield, capturing a number of women and children......March, 1857 Congress grants to Minnesota six alternate sections of land per mile to aid in the construction of railroads......March, 1857 Constitutional convention assembles at St. Paul, July 14, 1857. Republicans and Democrats organize separately,March, 1857 Constitutional convention assembles at St. Paul, July 14, 1857. Republicans and Democrats organize separately, prepare drafts, but unite and submit one constitution to the people (ratified 36,240 to 700), St. Paul the capital......Aug. 29, 1857 State issues $2,275,000 in bonds, out of $5,000,000 authorized by an amendment to the constitution, article IX., section 10, called Minnesota State railroad bonds, the credit of the State being pledged for interest and principal......April 15, 1858 Minnesota admitted into the Union......May 11, 1858 State normal school at Winona opened......1860 Rail
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
849 Ground broken for the Pacific Railroad by the mayor of St. Louis......July 4, 1850 William Jewell College at Liberty, chartered in 1849, opened......1850 At a joint convention to choose a United States Senator, Henry S. Geyer, of St. Louis, Whig, defeats Thomas H. Benton......Jan. 22, 1851 Destruction of the Industrial luminary, a newspaper published at Parkville, by a pro-slavery faction......April 14, 1855 Gov. Trusten Polk resigns to become United States Senator......March, 1857 Dred Scott and family emancipated by Taylor Blow, under deed for that purpose from the family of Calvin C. Chaffee, who inherited then......May 26, 1857 First overland mail leaves St. Louis for San Francisco......Sept. 16, 1858 First overland mail from California arrives at St. Louis twenty-four days eighteen and a half hours from San Francisco......Oct. 9, 1858 Legislature calls a State convention, that the will of the people may be ascertained and effectuated, but providing
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: Whetting the sword. (search)
eir work in Kansas. He spent several days in Concord, and made the acquaintance of many of its citizens; among others, of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry D. Thoreau, who have testified so clearly to his nobility of character. Near the end of March, 1857, being on my way to Washington, I met Capt. Brown in New York City, and spent a night with him at the Metropolitan Hotel. Capt. Brown objected to the show and extravagance of such an establishment, and said he preferred a plain tavern, where dexperienced men, and said that with a pike, or bow and arrows, he could arm recruits more formidably than with patent guns. How he ordered the pikes is thus stated by the maker of them: In the latter part of February, or the early part of March, 1857, Old Brown, as he is familiarly called, came to Collinsville to visit his relatives, and by invitation addressed the inhabitants at a public meeting. At the close of it, or on the following day, he exhibited some weapons which he claimed to h
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, The idealist among idealists. (search)
d, and spoke at a public meeting in the Town Hall, where, I am told, he exhibited the chain worn by his son John in Kansas, and, with a gesture and voice never to be forgotten by those who heard him, denounced the administration and the South for their work in Kansas. He spent several days in Concord, and made the acquaintance of many of its citizens; among others, of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry D. Thoreau, who have testified so clearly to his nobility of character. Near the end of March, 1857, being on my way to Washington, I met Capt. Brown in New York City, and spent a night with him at the Metropolitan Hotel. Capt. Brown objected to the show and extravagance of such an establishment, and said he preferred a plain tavern, where drovers and farmers lodged in a plain way. We went on to Philadelphia, and while there I was taken unwell, and could scarcely sit up. Capt. Brown nursed me as much as I had need of, and showed great skill and tenderness. In May he set out for Kansas,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
an statue of Washington at Richmond; the colossal statue of Liberty on the dome of the National Capitol; and the designs on the bronze doors of the Capitol, illustrating scenes in the history of the country. Among his statues are the Beethoven in the Music Hall, Boston, and the James Otis in the chapel at Mount Auburn.—Tuckerman's Book of Artists, pp. 306-320; Atlantic Monthly, July, 1869,—Thomas Crawford, A Eulogy, by George S. Hillard, pp. 40-54. Sumner, the day he arrived in Paris, in March, 1857, sought Crawford's lodgings, which he found only after a considerable effort. A fatal disease was upon him. Sumner wrote: The whole visit moved me much. This beautiful genius seems to be drawing to its close. Sumner attended his funeral in New York, on December 5, and was one of the pall-bearers with George W. Greene, H. T. Tuckerman, and Dr. Lieber. of New York; he commenced life humbly, learned something of sculpture in the study of Frazee, where among other things he worked on the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
popular indorsement, and with that view it was proposed to have him nominated as the Republican candidate for governor of Massachusetts. This election was assured by a large majority; and he might, after performing the duties from January to March, 1857, have accepted the new election as senator, which was to take place in January. Wilson cordially entered into this plan; Outside of Massachusetts it found favor. Governor Chase by letter, August 22, advised Sumner to accept the nominationould not but feel to-day that God had avenged the blows of May last; and I could not but feel that he will yet avenge the wrongs of the bondman and the insults we endure. Butler did not long survive Brooks. At the close of the session, in March, 1857, he went home, but not to return. He died May 25. Keitt lived to die in battle in Virginia in June, 1864. The pain and suffering which Sumner was called to endure did not, either at the time of the injury or during the whole period of his
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