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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 1 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 1 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 1 1 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
aced us under the highest obligations by presenting the following newspaper files: Charleston Courier from May 1856 to February 1865. Richmond Dispatch from April 1861 to April 1864. Charleston Mercury from July 1859 to February 1865 and from November 1866 to November 1868. Columbia Daily Carolinian from 1855 to October 1864. Charleston Daily News and News and Courier from June 1866 to this date. Camden Journal from January 1856 to this date. Southern Presbyterian from June 1858 to this date. And Dr. J. Dickson Bruns, of New Orleans, has sent us a bound volume of the Charleston Mercury for 1862. We have received recently other valuable contributions, which we have not space even to mention. Our present number has been delayed by causes over which we have had no control; but we think that we can promise that hereafter our Papers will appear promptly near the latter part of each month. A Confederate Roster has been a desideratum exceedingly difficult to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Washington on the Eve of the War. (search)
ibiting certain changes in the stations of troops made under the orders of the Secretary of War, John B. Floyd, during the years 1858-60 : After the removal of the troops to Kansas and Utah at the close of Indian hostilities in Florida, in June, 1858, there were left in the country east of the Mississippi River 16 companies of artillery. From that time (June, 1858) till December 31, 1860, some changes of stations occurred, by which the Department of the East gained 3 companies (2 of artillJune, 1858) till December 31, 1860, some changes of stations occurred, by which the Department of the East gained 3 companies (2 of artillery and 1 of engineers), so that at the end of 1860 there were 18 companies of artillery and 1 of engineers serving east of the Mississippi River. There were no troops in the neighborhood of Washington during the whole of Secretary Floyd's term of office. In the spring and summer of 1860 the force in Utah was reduced to 3 companies of dragoons, 3 companies of artillery, and 4 companies of infantry. The remainder (13 companies of infantry and 2 of dragoons) were sent to New Mexico, relieving 1
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Sixth joint debate, at Quincy, October 13, 1858. (search)
, will be most agreeable to us. In the month of May, 1856, the elements in the State of Illinois, which have since been consolidated into the Republican party, assembled together in a State Convention at Bloomington. They adopted at that time, what, in political language, is called a platform. In June of the same year, the elements of the Republican party in the nation assembled together in a National Convention at Philadelphia. They adopted what is called the National Platform. In June, 1858--the present year — the Republicans of Illinois reassembled at Springfield, in State Convention, and adopted again their platform, as I suppose, not differing in any essential particular from either of the former ones, but perhaps adding something in relation to the new developments of political progress in the country. The Convention that assembled in June last did me the honor, if it be one, and I esteem it such, to nominate me as their candidate for the United States Senate. I have
The Windward Passage, where this took place, is the usual highway for vessels plying between ports of the United States and the Caribbean Sea. Captain Crossman, of the Allianca, paid no attention to the gunboat and escaped the Spanish vessel. Secretary of State Gresham at once cabled Minister Taylor at Madrid that this government must demand a prompt apology from Spain. The general position taken by the United States was in accordance with the following resolution passed by the Senate in June, 1858: Any molestation by force or show of force on the part of a foreign power of an American vessel on the high seas in time of peace is in derogation of the sovereignty of the United States. The Spanish minister at Washington complicated the matter somewhat by his intemperate utterances to newspaper men, declaring that Captain Crossman must have dreamed that he saw a gunboat. For a time the affair promised serious complications, but on proofs of the occurrences being furnished, Spain apolog
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
ton dies at Washington, aged seventy-six......April 10, 1858 An act to admit Kansas under the Lecompton constitution......May 4, 1858 Minnesota admitted as the thirty-second State......May 11, 1858 Congress authorizes a loan of $20,000,000......June 14, 1858 First session adjourns......June 14, 1858 Second treaty with China of peace, amity, and commerce......June 18, 1858 Debates in the senatorial contest in Illinois between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas during......June and July, 1858 Remains of James Monroe, fifth President of the United States, buried at New York, 1831, taken up and conveyed to Virginia......July 2, 1858 Lecompton constitution for Kansas rejected by the people of Kansas, 11,088 to 1,788......Aug. 2, 1858 Atlantic submarine telegraph completed......Aug. 5, 1858 First message from Queen Victoria to President Buchanan......Aug. 16, 1858 [After twenty-three days, 400 messages having been transmitted, the cable lost its conductin
to the Union with a Constitution tolerating slavery if a hundred thousand people there wished it. Mr. Giddings of Ohio replied that he would never vote to compel his State to associate with another Slave State. Mr. Stanton, his colleague, added: I will say that the Republican members of this House, so far a I know, will never vote for the admission of any Slave State north of 36° 30'. The result of the dispute was the report of a bill for the admission of Kansas, which became a law in June, 1858, and substantially secured nearly all that the North had claimed in the matter. The people were authorized to form a new Constitution. Kansas did not come into the Union until nearly three years afterwards, just as it was going to pieces; and then it came in with an anti-slavery Constitution, and President Buchanan, consistently, signed the bill of admission. But the trouble did not end with the solution of the Kansas difficulty. The true character of that event, and the debates whic
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 26 (search)
fighting, and they never have. In 1787, when the Constitution was formed, James Madison and Rufus King, followed by the ablest men in the Convention, announced that the dissension between the States was not between great States and little, but between Free States and Slave. Even then the conflict had begun. In 1833, Mr. Adams said, on the floor of Congress: Whether Slave and Free States can cohere into one Union is a matter of theoretical speculation. We are trying the experiment. In June, 1858, Mr. Lincoln used the language: This country is half slave and half free. It must become either wholly slave or wholly free. In October of the same year, Mr. Seward, in his great irrepressible conflict speech at Rochester, said: The most pregnant remark of Napoleon is, that Europe is half Cossack and half republican. The systems are not only inconsistent, they are incompatible ; they never did exist under one government They never can. Our fathers, he goes on to say, recognized this tr
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 19: John Brown.—1859. (search)
s mention of Brown's December raid from Kansas into Lib. 29.7, 18, 47, 55, 119; Sanborn's Life of Brown, p. 481. Missouri—carrying off eleven slaves, whom he conducted to Canada—as an indication of what may come before long; the speaker himself only alluding at that time to [Underground] Railroad business on a somewhat extended scale, Sanborn's Brown, p. 436. to use Brown's own words to him. The nearest Mr. Garrison had come to accidental cognizance of Brown's designs, was the receipt, in June, 1858, of a Ms. June 12. letter from Sydney Howard Gay, asking his good offices with the Boston Kansas Committee on behalf of Col. Sanborn's Life of Brown, pp. 425-433. Hugh Forbes-known neither to Mr. Gay nor to Mr. Garrison as Brown's drill-master, whose betrayal of confidence had just caused a year's postponement of the Ibid., p. 460. invasion. To a son of Mr. Garrison's, his playmate, Francis Jackson Meriam, who presently enlisted under Ante, p. 424. Brown, had vaguely confided his thou
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
highly popular there at that time, too. The British pirate was not handicapped by the necessity of translation. A few words must yet be said upon the concentration of American publishing. In 1858 Simms wrote: We have not a single publisher in the whole South, from the Chesapeake to the Rio Grande. We have book sellers and printers, who occasionally issue books originally from the press but who . . . rarely succeed in selling them. Literary Prospects of the South, Russell's magazine, June, 1858, p. 202. There is a possibility that Simms did not write this unsigned article Concentration of population and facility of communication, both largely lacking, were, he thought, the two secrets of success. The Southern city which came nearest being a publishing centre at this period was Richmond, while Mobile had one firm of some local prominence; but the favourite publishers of Southern writers for a generation before the war were the Harpers, the Appletons, Jewett & Company, Derby & Jac
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1854. (search)
ivity, to the study of the great monuments of art and history, drinking in, with a thirsty mind, the culture of the Old World. During the whole two years, he was battling with his cruel disease. Yet at no time of his life, it would seem, was Lowell more captivating. Everywhere he made new friends, who were apt to think, such was the modesty of his demeanor, that they had achieved an original discovery in becoming aware of his splendid qualities. When Lowell returned from abroad, in June, 1858, he was still too unwell to think of resuming his former trying occupation, or of living in the climate of the Atlantic coast; and he took the office of local treasurer on the Burlington (Iowa) and Missouri River Railroad. This place did not offer the kind of work he most enjoyed, and he entered on it with great self-distrust; but his success was so decided that, in the opinion of a competent authority, he might, before he left, have been at the head of any railroad in the West that neede
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