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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 2 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 2 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 1 1 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune. You can also browse the collection for December 17th, 1860 AD or search for December 17th, 1860 AD in all documents.

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William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 8: during the civil war (search)
that its editor would not accept the Postmaster-Generalship. There was no moment of Mr. Lincoln's rule when any place in his gift would have been accepted by Mr. Greeley. --Tribune, March 16, 1872. The announcement of Lincoln's election was followed by instant threats of secession on the part of the South, and by demands for concessions to the slave power by many interests-business and political — in the North. Greeley met this situation by taking the ground, in the Tribune of December 17, 1860, that, if the right of the colonists to rebel against Great Britain was justified by the consent of the governed clause of the Declaration of Independence, that clause would justify the secession of five million of Southrons from the Federal Union in 1861. Jefferson's principle might be pushed to extreme and baleful consequences ; but, while he would not uphold the secession of Governor's Island from New York, if seven or eight contiguous States should secede from the Union he would