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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1860., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 24, 1860., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Your search returned 11 results in 10 document sections:

Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 6: Affairs at the National Capital.--War commenced in Charleston harbor. (search)
a letter to Rhett, the editor of the Charleston Mercury, said: I know all that has been done here, but depend upon nothing that Mr. Buchanan promises. He will cheat us unless we are too quick for him. Autograph letter, dated Washington, December 22, 1860. He then urged the seizure of the forts, Sumter particularly, without a moment's delay. Neither would the conspirators fully trust each other. William H. Trescot, already mentioned, a South Carolinian, and then Assistant Secretary of Stat of the Navy (Toucey), it is alleged, refused to give the order for the purpose, I should have told you that Toucey has refused to have the Brooklyn sent from Monroe. --Autograph Letter of Charles to the Editor of the Charleston Mercury, December 22, 1860, already cited on page 148. and the President yielded; now, under the advice of General Scott and Secretary Holt, orders were given for her to be made ready to start at a moment's notice. This order was revealed to the conspirators. Virgi
o him, convincing proofs that an early collision with the Confederates was not seriously apprehended in the highest quarters. and the advisers in whom he most trusted, seemed still incredulous as to the inevitability and imminence of a clash of arms. Gov. Seward, the new Secretary of State, had for months been apparently the most resolute of optimists with regard to a happy issue from our internal complications. At the New England Dinner Anniversary of the Landing of the Pilgrims, December 22, 1860. in New York, lie had confidently predicted a settlement of all our troubles within the ensuing sixty days. That term had sped; yet his faith in a peaceful solution of our differences appeared as buoyant as ever, and seemed to be shared by the President, whose Nobody hurt as yet had become a watchword among the obstinate believers in Manifest Destiny and the unparalleled rationality, wisdom, intelligence, and self-control, of the peerless American People. Does this look like infatu
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Contents of Thie first volume. (search)
Contents of Thie first volume.   Diary. I.--Diary of Events,Page 3 II.--DOCUMENTSDOCUMENT Page   Doc. Page 1.Maryland--Reply of Gov. Hicks to Mississippi Commissioner,1 2.South Carolina--Secession Ordnance2 3.South Carolina--Declaration of Causes, &c.,3 4.Seward's Speech at New York, Dec. 22, 1860,4 5.Toombs' Address to the Georgians,7 6.South Carolina Congressmen's Resignation,8 7.Evacuation of Fort Moultrie,8 8.Forts Sumter and Moultrie,8 9.Major Anderson's Movement,9 10.Secretary Floyd to the President,10 11.General Wool's Letters on the Crisis,10 12.South Carolina Commissioners to the President, and Reply,11 13.Charleston Mercury's Appeal to Florida,16 14.Buchanan's Proclamation of a Fast Day,17 15.Carrington's Call to Washington Volunteers,17 16.Gov. Hicks' Address,17 17.Gov. Ellis to Secretary Holt, and Reply,18 18.Major Anderson to Gov. Pickens, and Reply,19 19.Alabama Ordinance of Secession,19 20.N. Y. State Resolutions,21 21.Capt. McGowan's
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stephens, Alexander Hamilton -1883 (search)
o guard. Prior to the writing of this letter, and just after the delivery of his great Milledgeville speech, in which he expressed similar views, Mr. Stephens received from the then President-elect Lincoln a note asking for a revised copy of that speech. To this Mr. Stephens replied in a letter which concludes with these words: The country is certainly in great peril, and no man ever had heavier or greater responsibilities than you have in the present momentous crisis. Under date of Dec. 22, 1860, Lincoln replied in the following letter, which, it is to be noted, was held secret by Mr. Stephens until after the death of the President: [For your own eye only.] My dear Sir,—Your obliging answer to my short note is just received, and for which please accept my thanks. I fully appreciate the present peril the country is in, and the weight of responsibility on me. Do the people of the South really entertain fears that a Republican administration would directly or indirectly
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
ntial but given to the public in 1885: Springfield, Dec. 21, 1860. Hon. E. B. Washburne, My Dear Sir:—Last night I received your letter giving an account of your interview with Gen. Scott, for which I thank you. Please present my respects to the General and tell him confidentially I shall be obliged to him to be as well prepared as he can to either hold or retake the forts as the case may require at and after the inauguration. Yours, as ever, A. Lincoln. On the next day, December 22d, 1860, Mr. Lincoln wrote to Mr. Stephens, of Georgia, a letter marked For your eye only, in which he asks, Do the people of the South entertain fears that a Republican administration would directly or indirectly interfere with the slaves, or with them about their slaves? If they do I wish to assure you as once a friend and still I hope not an enemy, that there is no cause for fears. (War between the States I, 267.) Taking up agan the proceedings of Congress for brief review, the severe
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
of their historic name. Captain Theodore Brevard Hayne, son of the foregoing, was born at Montgomery, Ala., March 12, 1841, but after the return of the family to South Carolina in 1847 he was reared at Charleston. At the age of thirteen he attended the preparatory school of Stephen D. Lee at Asheville, N. C., and he was subsequently a student at Coward & Jenkins' military school at Yorkville, the Arsenal military school at Columbia and the Citadel military school at Charleston. On December 22, 1860, two days after the passage of the ordinance of secession, he joined the Marion artillery of Charleston, commanded by Capt. Gadsden King, and in January he was appointed first lieutenant in the First regiment of South Carolina regulars. He was on duty during the bombardment of Fort Sumter, at the battery from which the first shell was fired, and subsequently entered the Confederate States service, with assignment to Appalachicola, Fla., for the organizing and drilling of troops. Then
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Life, services and character of Jefferson Davis. (search)
ington city of him who uttered the words, Charity to all, malice to none, and he is represented in the act of breaking the manacles of a slave. Suppose there were carved on its pedestal the words: Do the Southern people really entertain fears that a Republican administration would directly or indirectly interfere with the slaves or with them about their slaves? The South would be in no more danger in this respect than it was in the days of Washington. This was his utterance December 22, 1860, after South Carolina had seceded. Carve again: I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it now exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so. These are the words of his inaugural address March 4, 1861. Carve yet again: Resolved, That this war is not waged upon our part with any purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the rights or established institutions of
Washington, Dec. 22, 1860. Mr. Breckinridge, in forming the Committee of Thirteen, shows the difference between himself and Pennington. He has placed the ablest men of all sections on it, and if anything can be done to stop the Revolution they will do it. Conservatives place great confidence in this committee. Meantime, Lincoln's virtual declaration of war against South Carolina has dispelled the hopes of many who went to bed last night in the most sanguine spirits. If it is expected that threats will have any other influence than to confirm South Carolina in her position, and to bring the whole South actively to her aid, the Republicans are grievously in error. There is much despondency here today. The bill authorizing the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to extend its Washington branch across the Long Bridge so as to connect with the Virginia roads, passed the Senate yesterday by a decided vote of 35 yeas to 15 nays.--The bill is hampered with many amendments which
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.reception of the secession news. Madison C. H., Va.,Dec. 22, 1860. I have only time to write you a line, to say that the news of the secession of South Carolina was received here with many demonstrations of delight. A "Lone Star" flag has been raised, guns fired, and bonfires burnt. Our people are fully aroused and prepared for any emergency. They believe the day for compromise is past, and that there is little hope of redressing our wrongs in the Union. Many here are for immediate secession, and all for resistance. A submissionist in Madison would be a greater curiosity than Fremont's "woolly horse." Lone Star.
n States received in 1860 less instead of more than the quota of arms to which they were entitled by law; and that three of them--N. Carolina Mississippi, and Kentucky--received no arms whatever, and this simply because they did not ask for them. Well may Mr. Stanton have said in the House, "that there are a good deal of rumors and speculations and misapprehensions as to the true state of facts in regard to this matter." 2. Secretary Floyd, under suspicious circumstances on the 22d December, 1860, and but a few days before he left the Department, had, without the knowledge of the President, ordered 113 columbiads and 11 32 po nders to be transported from Pittsburg to Ship island and Galveston, in Mississippi and Texas. This fact was brought to the knowledge of the President by a communication from Pittsburg; and Secretary Holt immediately thereafter countermanded the order of his predecessor, and the cannon were never sent. The promptitude with which we acted elicited a vote