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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 6: Affairs at the National Capital.--War commenced in Charleston harbor. (search)
e reached Washington, and produced the greatest consternation among the conspirators. The Cabinet assembled at midday. They had a stormy session. Floyd urgently demanded an order for Anderson's return to Fort Moultrie, alleging that the President, by withholding it, was violating the solemn pledges of the Government. The latter, remembering his implied, if not actual pledges, was inclined to give the order; See Letter of President Buchanan to the Commissioners of South Carolina, December 30, 1860. but the warning voices of law, duty, and public opinion made him hesitate. They spoke to his conscience and his prudence about faithfulness, impeachment, and a trial for treason; and to his patriotism concerning the goodness and the greatness of his native land, and its claims upon his gratitude. He paused, and the Cabinet adjourned without definite action. The position of the aged President, during the eventful week we are here considering, was a most painful one. He was eviden
of, 3.105. Brown, Col. H., takes command at Fort Pickens, 1.369. Brownlow, Rev. W. G., imprisoned at Knoxville, 2.38; permitted to leave the Confederacy, 2.39; house of visited by the author, in 1866, 3.284. Brownsville, Texas, capture of by Gen. Banks, 3.223. Bruinburg, Grant crosses the Mississippi at, 2.603. Buchanan, Commodore, McKean, death of, at the battle of the Bayou Teche, 2.597. Buchanan, President, James, conspirators in the cabinet of, 1.43; his message of Dec. 30, 1860, 1.64; his indecision, 1. 73, 283; distrusted by the Southern conspirators, 1.143; painful position of, 1.146; changes in his cabinet, 1.146; his message of Jan. 8, 1861, 1.218; disruption of his cabinet, 2.527. Buckner, Gen. Simon B., left in command of Fort Donelson by Floyd and Pillow, 2.219; terms of surrender offered to by Grant, 2.220. Buell, Gen., Don Carlos, in command of the Department of the Ohio, 2.179; operations of, in Kentucky, 2.190-2.195; leaves Nashville to join Gr
on. Under present circumstances, they are a standing menace which renders negotiation impossible, and, as our recent experience shows, threatens speedily to bring to a bloody issue questions which ought to be settled with temperance and judgment. We have the honor, sir, to be, very respectfully, your obedient servants, R. W. Barnwell, J. H. Adams, Commissioners. James L. Orr, To the President of the United States. reply of the President to the commissioners Washington City, December 30, 1860. Gentlemen: I have the honor to receive your communication of 28th inst., together with a copy of your full powers from the Convention of the People of South Carolina, authorizing you to treat with the Government of the United States on various important subjects therein mentioned, and also a copy of the ordinance bearing date on the 20th inst., declaring that the union now subsisting between South Carolina and other States, under the name of The United States of America, is hereby
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
with its garrison, consisting of seven officers, sixty-one non-commissioned officers and privates, and thirteen musicians, occupies Fort Sumter......night of Dec. 26, 1860 Ralph Farnham, last survivor of the battle of Bunker Hill, dies at Acton, N. H., aged 104 1/2......Dec. 27, 1860 Castle Pinckney and Fort Moultrie seized by South Carolina State troops......Dec. 27, 1860 United States arsenal, with 75,000 stands of arms, seized by South Carolina State troops at Charleston......Dec. 30, 1860 Edward D. Baker, of Oregon, answers the plea of Judah P. Benjamin, of Louisiana, in the Senate for the right of secession......Jan. 2, 1861 Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah River, Ga., seized by Georgia State troops......Jan. 3, 1861 United States arsenal seized at Mount Vernon, Ala., by the Alabama State troops......Jan. 4, 1861 Forts Morgan and Gaines, at the entrance of Mobile Bay, seized by the Alabama State troops......Jan. 5, 1861 Fernando Wood, mayor of
nder present circumstances, they are a standing menace which renders negotiation impossible, and, as our recent experience shows, threatens speedily to bring to a bloody issue questions which ought to be settled with temperance and judgment. We have the honor to be, Very respectfully, your obedient servants, R. W. Barnwell, Commissioners. J. H. Adams, Commissioners. Jas. L. Orr, Commissioners. To the President of the United States. The President's reply. Washington city, Dec. 30, 1860. gentlemen: I have had the honor to receive your communication of 28th inst., together with a copy of your full powers from the Convention of the people of South Carolina, authorizing you to treat with the Government of the United States, on various important subjects therein mentioned, and also a copy of the Ordinance, bearing date on the 20th inst., declaring that the Union now subsisting between South Carolina and other States, under the name of the United States of America, is her
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, South Carolina, 1860 (search)
1860 Dec. 20: Adoption of Secession OrdinanceBy State. Dec. 26: Evacuation of Fort MoultrieBy Major Robert Anderson, and occupation of Fort Sumpter. UNITED STATES--Batteries "E" and "H" 1st Arty. Dec. 27: Seizure of Castle Pinckney and Fort MoultrieBy State Troops. Dec. 30: Seizure of Charleston ArsenalBy State Troops.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 44: Secession.—schemes of compromise.—Civil War.—Chairman of foreign relations Committee.—Dr. Lieber.—November, 1860April, 1861. (search)
tifying his change of position on the ground that they had not been accepted as satisfactory by the recusant States; but they were carried in the committee against his negative vote. Journal of the Committee of Thirty-three. New York Tribune, Dec. 30 and 31, 1860; New York Herald, December 31; New York Evening Post, Jan. 15. 1861. Within three weeks from this action, he made a speech in the house, January 31, in which he returned to the support of the propositions he had offered and later reith certain and absolute triumph at the end, crowned and glorified by the abolition of slavery. Works, vol. v. pp. 449-467, where Sumner's letters to Governor Andrew and others at this time are given. His letter to Rev. E. E. Hale, dated Dec. 30, 1860, was read by the latter at Faneuil Hall, March 14, 1874. The North American Review (1879), vol. CXXIX. pp. 125, 375, 484, gives anonymous reminiscences from The Diary of a Public Man, some of which describe interviews with Sumner at the time
Notice to all concerned. --Was committed to the jail of Henrico county, on the 30th Dec. 1860, a Negro Woman, who says her name is Caroline. It is unknown whether she is slave or free, and is evidently entirely deranged. Any one interested in the above negro is particularly requested to give information to the Jailor of Henrico county. The said woman is about thirty-five years old, very black, and had on when committed, a new linsey frock, and nothing else. G. D. Pleasants, S. H. C. ja 14--ts