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Charleston, Feb. 18, 1861. I beg that you, nor your readers, will get offended if I give you a little something beside politics and the on dits of our city — a little religion will not hurt, I am sure. I will get on politics soon enough. Yesterday being a bright, sunny day, I visited the Citadel Square Baptist Church, Rev. Dr. Kendrick, Pastor. This is a new house, not yet completed on the exterior, of the "Norman " order of architecture, and cost seventy-five thousand dollars, and, as I understand, all paid for. There was a large congregation in attendance. They have perhaps the finest organ in the city, performed on by Prof. Robinson. The choir is a select one, and, I learn from musical amatears, it is equal to any in the city. One female voice in that choir was to my unpracticed ear most exquisite. I may say it appeared to me to have more sweetness and melody in it than any voice of the same volume I ever heard.--I understand this sweet singer is a Miss Sey
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.Palmetto flag, &c. Wytheville, Va., Wytheville, Va., Feb. 20, 1861 To-day has been one of much interest to the people of this town, owing to the raising of a Palmetto or secession flag, which was thrown to the breeze at three P. M., amidst the cheers of the populace. It is the first flag of the kind I have seen — can't say that I admire the design as much as the object — probably on account of its rattlesnake appear- ance, as I have a perfect horror of such reptiles, and would not tread on one for the whole Confederacy. I think our Southern friends, when they split the Union, they ought to have split the flag also, carrying away as many stars as States, and as many stripes as possible for their enemies. This would be handsome, in my opinion. At our last County Court the Magistrates voted $4,000 to arm the people of the county, and a committee of gentlemen have started to purchase the weapons. I am told they are to be of long ra
Dispatch from Senator Clingman. --The Charlotte (N. C.) Bulletin has received the following dispatch from Senator Clingman: Washington, Feb. 18, 1861. Editor Bulletin: There is no chance whatever for Crittenden's proposition. North Carolina must secede or aid Lincoln in making war on the South. T. L. Clingman.
nes in certain cases;" "an act authorizing the Commissioners of the Revenue for the Southern District of Halifax county to issue a license to David Apt as a hawker and pedlar;" and a House bill entitled "an act compensating Peter P. Penn for the loss of his slave Albert." On motion of Mr. Whittle, the Senate took up the bill entitled "an act to take the scene of the people on certain ordinances of the Convention, which assembled at the Capitol; in the city of Richmond, on the 18th day of February, 1861," and the same, after being amended, was passed. Small notes. Mr. Coghill, from the Committee on Courts of Justice, presented a bill for the relief of savings banks and other corporations of this Commonwealth, and exempting them from the penalties imposed by existing laws for the issue of small notes. Resolutions. By Mr. Newton: A resolution that the Committee on Agriculture and Commerce inquire into the expediency of incorporating the Preston Coal and Iron Compan
ngress in reference to the resolution of consure upon his ex-Secretary of War. We publish it as part of the history of the times; To the Senate and House of Representatives: The insurrection which is yet existing in the United States and aims at the overthrow of the Federal Constitution and the Union, was clandestinely prepared during the winter of 1860 and 1861, and assumed an open organization in the form of a reasonable provisional Government at Montgomery. Alabama, on the 8th day of February, 1861. On the 12th day of April, 1861,the insurgents committed the flagrant act of civil war by the bombardment and capture of Fort Sumter, which cut off the hope of immediate conciliation. Immediately after wards, all the roads and avenues to this city were obstructed, and the capital was put into the condition of a siege. The mails in every direction were stopped, and the lines of telegraph cut off by the insurgents, and military and naval forces, which had been called out by the
nd their transportation to the South in anticipation of the rebellion. The most conclusive answer to this allegation is that, notwithstanding the boasting of Mr. Floyd at Richmond, evidently with the view of conciliating his new allies, cited by the General as his authority, no public arms were ever stolen. This fact is established by the report of the Committee-on Military Affairs of the House of Representatives, now before me, made by Mr. Stanton, of Ohio, their Chairman, on the 18th of February, 1861, and to be found in the second volume of the Reports of Committees of the House for the session of 1860-61. This report, and the testimony before the Committee, establish: 1. That the Southern States received in 1860 less instead of more than the quota of arms to which they were entitled by law; and that three of them--N. Carolina Mississippi, and Kentucky--received no arms whatever, and this simply because they did not ask for them. Well may Mr. Stanton have said in the House
The Daily Dispatch: September 2, 1863., [Electronic resource], The capture of gunboats on the Rappahannock. (search)
h of May, 1860, at the age of 44; black complexion, black hair, black eyes, 5 feet 5½ inches high; war on the outside of the right leg, one on the left hand just above the joint of the little finger, and one on the same arm, near the elbow. 2. Taylor Brown, sentenced in Richmond city June 22d, 1860, at the age of 21; black hair, black eye, black complexion, 5 feet 6 inches high; two scars on the left shoulder, caused by burns. 3. Wm Pendleton, sentenced in the city of Richmond February 18th, 1861, at the age of 14; ginger bread color, black hair, black eyes, 4 feet 10 inches high; no visible scars. 4. John Lewis, sentenced in Albemarle county June 16th, 1860, at the age of 18; bright mulatto light sandy hair, gray eyes, 5 feet 5¼ inches high, one scar on the joint of the right, wrist, and a small one just below the elbow of the left arm. 5. Phil, sentenced in James City county February 4th, 1862, at the age of 23 years; black complexion, black hair, black eyes, 5 feet
The Daily Dispatch: September 4, 1863., [Electronic resource], From Tennessee — the evacuation of Knoxville. (search)
f May, 1860, at the age of 44; black complexion, black hair, black eyes, 5 feet 5¼ inches high; scar on the outside of the right log, one on the left, hand just above the joint of the little finger, and one on the same arm, near the elbow. 2. Taylor Brown, sentenced in Richmond city June 22d, 1860, at the age of 21; black hair, black eyes, black complexion, 5 feet 6 inches high; two scars on the left shoulder, caused by burns. 3. Wm Pendleton, sentenced in the city of Richmond February 18th, 1861, at the age of 14; ginger bread color, black hair, black eyes, 4 feet 10 inches high; no visible scars. 4. John Lewis, sentenced in Albemarle county June 16th, 1860, at the age of 18; bright mulatto high sandy hair, gray eyes, 5 feet 5¼ inches high; one scar on the joint of the fight wrist, and one small one just below the elbow of the left arm. 5. Phil, sentenced in James City county February 4th, 1862, at the age of 23 years; black complexion, black hair, black eyes, 5 feet
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