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er, Clark, Collamer, Cowan, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Harris, Howe, King, Lane, of Ind., Lane, of Kansas, McDougall, Morrill, Rice, Sherman, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, Wilmot, and Wilson--29. The bill increasing the pay of soldiers being that day under consideration, Mr. Wilson, of Mass., moved to add the following: And be it further enacted, That all the acts, proclamations, and orders of the President of the United States, after the 4th of March, 1861, respecting the Army and Navy of the United States, and calling out or relating to the militia or volunteers from the States, are hereby approved, and in all respects legalized and made valid, to the same intent, and with the same effect, as if they had been issued and done under the previous express authority and direction of the Congress of the United States. The amendment was agreed to, and the bill thereupon passed, as follows: Yeas 33; Nays--Messrs. Breckinridge, Kennedy,
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 24: conclusion — military lessons of the War. (search)
vernment were extremely wavering and weak, for which an excuse can be found in the fact that many of the Southern representatives remained in Congress, sharing in the public councils, and influencing legislation. But as soon as Mr. Lincoln was installed, there was no longer any reason why Congress and the cabinet should have hesitated. They should have measured the cause, provided the means, and left the Executive to apply the remedy. At the time of Mr. Lincoln's inauguration, viz., March 4, 1861, the Regular Army, by law, consisted of two regiments of dragoons, two regiments of cavalry, one regiment of mounted rifles, four regiments of artillery, and ten regiments of infantry, admitting of an aggregate strength of thirteen thousand and twenty-four officers and men. On the subsequent 4th of May the President, by his own orders (afterward sanctioned by Congress), added a regiment of cavalry, a regiment of artillery, and eight regiments of infantry, which, with the former army, adm
f the true nature of the designs of the party which elevated to power the present occupant of the Presidential Chair at Washington, and which sought to conceal its purposes by every variety of artful device, and by the perfidious use of the most solemn and repeated pledges on every possible occasion. I extract, in this connection, as a single example, the following declaration, made by President Lincoln under the solemnity of his oath as Chief Magistrate of the United States, on the fourth of March, 1861: Apprehension seems to exist among the people of the Southern States that by the accession of a republican administration their property and their peace and personal security are to be endangered. There has never been any reasonable cause for such apprehensions. Indeed, the most ample evidence to the contrary has all the while existed and been open to their inspection. It is found in nearly all the public speeches of him who now addresses you. I do but quote from one of thos
men, held at Manchester, on the thirty-first of December, and in acknowledgment of the address which I had the pleasure to forward from that meeting. I am, sir, your obedient servant, Charles Francis Adams. Abel Heywood, Esq., Chairman, etc., Manchester. Executive mansion, Washington, January 19, 1863. To the Workingmen of Manchester: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the address and resolutions which you sent me on the eve of the new year. When I came on the fourth of March, 1861, through a free and constitutional election, to preside in the Government of the United States, the country was found at the verge of civil war. Whatever might have been the cause, or whosesoever the fault, one duty, paramount to all others, was before me, namely, to maintain and preserve at once the Constitution and the integrity of the Federal Republic. A conscientious purpose to perform this duty is the key to all the measures of administration which have been, and to all which wi
g as a new section, That all the acts, proclamations, and orders of the President of the United States, after the fourth of March, 1861, respecting the army and navy of the United States, and calling out or relating to the militia or volunteers from the second section, That all the acts, proclamations, and orders of the President of the United States, after the fourth of March, 1861, respecting the army and navy of the United States, and the calling out, or relating to the militia or volunteers additional section, That all the acts, proclamations, and orders of the President of the United States after the fourth of March, 1861, respecting the army and navy of the United States, and calling out or relating to the militia or volunteers from ould apply to the widows, children, mothers, and sisters of chaplains of the land forces who had died since the fourth day of March, 1861, or should die of wounds or disease contracted in the service of the United States, or while such chaplains were
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
ceded. January 19, 1861: Georgia seceded. January 26, 1861: Louisiana seceded. February, 1861. February 1, 1861: Texas seceded. February 4, 1861: Confederate States of America provisionally organized at Montgomery, Ala. February 9, 1861: Jefferson Davis elected provisional President of the Confederate States of America. February 18, 1861: Jefferson Davis inaugurated President of the Confederate States at Montgomery, Ala. March, 1861. March 4, 1861: Abraham Lincoln inaugurated President of the United States at Washington. April, 1861. April 12, 1861: bombardment of Fort Sumter, S. C. Union 1st U. S. Art. Confed. S. C. Art. No casualties. April 14, 1861: evacuation of Fort Sumter, S. C. By U. S. Losses: Union 1 killed, 5 wounded by premature explosion of cannon in firing a salute to the United States flag. April 17, 1861: Virginia adopted the ordinance of secession, subject to popular vote. April 1
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Introduction — the Federal Navy and the blockade (search)
e only a paper one, as, to justify the seizure on the high seas of a neutral attempting to enter a port declared blockaded, there must be a force off the port sufficient to make entry dangerous. To enable captures of such ships to be made, the Federal Government soon had to yield its theory of insurgency and treat the situation as one of belligerency. The indecisive attitude of the administration during the period between the secession of South Carolina, December 20, 1860, and the 4th of March, 1861, was of a character to encourage the secessionist movement to the utmost. The only forts of the South which were garrisoned were Monroe and Sumter. Notwithstanding General Scott's report of inability to garrison the Southern forts for want of men, there can be no question, from the returns of the War Department itself, that there was a number quite sufficient to hold them against any but tried soldiers in large force. Two hundred men at each A fighting inventor rear-admiral John
Washington. The nineteenth army corps The sixth army corps in the grand review—the corps that saved Washington from capture The twentieth army corps The armies of the United States in the Civil War By the provisions of the Constitution, the President of the United States is commanderin-chief of the army and navy. During the Civil War, this function was exercised in no small degree by President Lincoln. As Secretaries of War, he had in his cabinet Simon Cameron, from March 4, 1861, to January 14, 1862; and Edward M. Stanton, who served from January 15, 1862, throughout Lincoln's administration, and also under Johnson until May 28, 1868, except for a short interval during which he was suspended. There were four generals-in-chief of the armies: Brevet Lieutenant-General Scott, Major-Generals McClellan and Halleck, and Lieutenant-General Grant. The last named has been considered in previous pages of this volume, but the lives and services of the other three are sum
dment—which is the very least the South can or ought to take—then, here in Maine, not a Democrat will be found who will raise his arm against his brethren of the South. From one end of the State to the other let the cry of the Democracy be, Compromise or Peaceable Separation! That these were not expressions of isolated or exceptional sentiment is evident from the fact that they were copied with approval by other Northern journals. Lincoln, when delivering his inaugural address on March 4, 1861, had not so far lost all respect for the consecrated traditions of the founders of the Constitution and for the majesty of the principle of state sovereignty as openly to enunciate the claim of coercion. While arguing against the right to secede, and asserting his intention to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the Government, and collect the duties and imposts, he says that, beyond what may be necessary for these objects, there will be no invasion, no using
the complete and crowning proof of the true nature of the designs of the party which elevated to power the person then occupying the presidential chair at Washington, and which sought to conceal its purposes by every variety of artful device and by the perfidious use of the most solemn and repeated pledges on every possible occasion. A single example may be cited from the declaration made by President Lincoln, under the solemnity of his oath as chief magistrate of the United States, on March 4, 1861: Apprehension seems to exist among the people of the Southern States, that, by the accession of a Republican Administration, their property and their peace and personal security are to be endangered. There has never been any reasonable cause for such apprehensions. Indeed, the most ample evidence to the contrary has all the while existed and been open to their inspection. It is found in nearly all the public speeches of him who now addresses you. I do not quote from one of those s
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