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Trustee's Sale of Land and Negroes in Amelia. --I will offer for sale at Amelia Court-House, on Thursday, the 28th of March, 1861, (Court day,) a valuable Tract of Land, containing about 500 acres, and situated about five miles from Amelia Court-House. Also, Seven likely Negroes. consisting of men, women and boys, the same being the property of E. E. Howson, and conveyed to me under a deed of trust, and of record in the Clerk's Office of the County of Amelia. Jos. N. Vaughan, Trustee, Terms will be made known on the day of sale. mh 22--6t*
Trustee's Sale of Land and Negroes in Amelia. --I will offer for sale at Amelia Court-House, on Thursday, the 28th of March, 1861, (Court day,) a valuable Tract of Land, containing about 500 acres, and situated about five miles from Amelia Court-House. Also, Seven Likely Negroes. consisting of men, women and boys, the same being the property of E. E. Howson, and conveyed to me under a deed of trust, and of record in the Clerk's Office of the County Court of Amelia. Jos. N. Vaughan. Trustee. Terms will be made known on the day of sale. mh 22--6t*
Virginia State Convention.thirty-seventh day. Thursday, March 28, 1861. The Convention assembled at 10 o'clock.--Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Willis, of the Baptist Church. Voice of the people. Mr. Carell, of Nelson, presented a series of resolutions adopted by the citizens of that county, in favor of immediate secession. Referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Equality of taxation. The Convention proceeded, in the order of business, to consider the resolutions of the gentleman from Monongalia, (Mr. Willey.)--Mr. Turner, of Jackson, who was entitled to the floor, being absent, Mr. Early embraced the opportunity to make a correction of the report in the official organ of the Convention, the Richmond Enquirer. Mr. Turner having by this time arrived, took the floor, and continued his speech in favor of an ad valorem tax on slaves. He argued its necessity, in order to the maintenance of the credit of the State. While repudiation was staring us in t
General Assembly of Virginia.[Extra session.]Senate. Thursday, March 28th, 1861. The Senate met at the usual hour, Lieut. Gov. Montague in the chair. On motion, the Committee on Enrolled Bills was enlarged by the addition of the following names: Messrs. Nash, Claiborne, Newman, A. D. Dickinson, and Quesenberry. The following House bills, communicated during the morning, were read a third time and passed: Authorizing the Board of Public Works to appoint Commissioners to estimate and report losses sustained by Wm. W. King in the construction and repair of a turnpike road; to incorporate the Tobacco Savings Bank in the city of Richmond; providing for a special election in the town of Marion, in the county of Smythe; incorporating the Farmers' and Mechanics' Insurance Company of the city of Richmond; an act to increase the pay of the Commonwealth's Attorney for the Circuit Court of the county of Ohio; making an appropriation for the removal to Virginia of the remains o
House of Delegates. Thursday, March 28, 1861. The Hous was called to order at 10 o'clock by the Speaker. The House were informed by a Senate communication that that body had passed, among other acts, House bill authorizing the voluntary enslavement of the free negroes of the Commonwealth, "without compensate on to the State," with amendments which were agreed to by the House. Senate bill exempting the Wheeling and Belmont Bridge Company from taxation for a period of six years, was taken up and read twice. Being put on its passage, it was advocated by Messrs.Knotth, Haymond, Anderson, Gibson of H., and Edgington, and opposed by Mr. Collier, of Petersburg. The roll was called at the suggestion of Mr. Knotth, and the bill passed — ayes 81, noes 27. The following Senate resolution was agreed to: Resolved, by the General Assembly, That Col. Augus W. McDonald have the exclusive right and privilege of printing and publishing such manuscripts obtained by him from
Richmond Markets, March 28, 1861. Apples.--Northern $2.50@3.50; Virginia Pippins $2.50 to $4. Bacon.--Demand moderate. We quote Sides 10¼@11 cts.; Shoulders 8¾@ cts.; plain Hams 11½@12 cts; Sugar-cured 13@13½ cents; Todd's Bams 14 cts. Stock light. Bags.--Seamless Bags, 25; Manchester do., 19@23; Gunny do., 12@14 Beans.--White $1@1.10 per bushel. Beeswax.--27 cts. Brooms. --$2@3, according to quality. Buckets, &c.--Paluted Buckets $1.87½@$2 per dozen; three-hoop Painted Pails $2.25@2.50 per dozen; heavy Cedar Tubs, neat, $3.50@$5 nest; heavy Cedar Feed Buckets $6.50 per dozen. Butter.--We quote good Butter at 20 to 25; Inferior 8 to 10 Candles.--Tallow 13½@14 .; Jackson's 14; Hull's 16; Adamantine 18@20; Sperm 45; Patent Sperm 54@56 Cement.--James River $1.70@1.80 per bbl.; Northern Rosendale at $1.70@1.80. Coal.--White and Red Ash Anthracite Coal, for grates, $7.50 per cart load of 25 bushels, per ton of 2,240 per $8; Foun<
ime: Dispatch To the Editors of the Dispatch: --Enclosed I send you the copy of a communication received this morning from the Secretary of War, in relation to the "Bellona guns." In as much as the exciting scenes in our Legislature. as well as the street gossip, concerning them, have engaged a considerable share of public attention, this letter may possess some interest for your readers. A desire to prevent a conflict between the citizens of Richmond and the United States authorities, in removing them to Fort Monroe, prompted me to request the Secretary of War to countermand any orders he might have issued for their removal. J. M.McCue. Yours, respectfully, War Department, March 28, 1861 Dear Sir --I have had the honor to receive your favor of the 26th inst., for which please accept the thanks of the Department. No order has been given for the removal of the guns at the Bellona Foundry, to Fort Monroe. Simon Cameron. I am, sir, very truly, yours,
The Daily Dispatch: April 2, 1861., [Electronic resource], Action of the Philadelphia Conference on Slavery. (search)
Forged drafts. Cincinnati,March 28, 1861. --Drafts drawn by the Cataract Bank, at Lockport, New York, on the Ocean Bank of New York, for $7,000, have been sold to bankers here. One of the party concerned in the disposal of them has been arrested, and $50,000 of the same kind of drafts were found in his trunk. Another of the implicated party has gone West with $40,000 more. The first drafts sold were intended to be paid, in order to get the party's credit up but it is believed that a grand fraud was contemplated.
Superintendent of the Gas Works Richmond. March 28, 1861. To Messrs. T. C. Burns, Thomas Faberty, Hagan's John, J. C. Strockin, and others: Gentlemen --Your request that I should announce myself a candidate for the office of Superintendent of the City Gas Works is before me. I readily comply with it, and hereby declare myself a candidate. If elected, I will use every endeavor to subserve the interests of the city. Very respectfully, your ob't serv't. Thos. R. Sharp. mh 20--tde*
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