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Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 3 3 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 3 3 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 3 3 Browse Search
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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, I. April, 1861 (search)
I. April, 1861 My flight from the North and escape into Virginia. Revolutionary scene at Richmond. the Union Convention passes the ordinance of secession. great excitement prevails in the South. April 8 Burlington, New Jersey.-The expedition sails to-day from New York. Its purpose is to reduce Fort Moultrie, Charleston harbor, and relieve Fort Sumter, invested by the Confederate forces. Southern born, and editor of the Southern Monitor, there seems to be no alternative but to depart immediately. For years the Southern Monitor, Philadelphia, whose motto was The Union as it was, the Constitution as it is, has foreseen and foretold the resistance of the Southern States, in the event of the success of.a sectional party inimical to the institution of African slavery, upon which the welfare and existence of the Southern people seem to depend. And I must depart immediately; for I well know that the first gun fired at Fort Sumter will be the signal for an outburst of
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XIX. October, 1862 (search)
ur people, or assisted by European intervention, I wonder whether President Davis will be regarded by the world as a second Washington? What will his own country say of him? I know not, of course; but I know what quite a number here say of him now. They say he is a small specimen of a statesman, and no military chieftain at all. And worse still, that he is a capricious tyrant, for lifting up Yankees and keeping down great Southern men. Wise, Floyd, etc. are kept in obscurity; while Pemberton, who commanded the Massachusetts troops, under Lincoln, in April, 1861, is made a lieutenant-general; G. W. Smith and Lovell, who were officeholders in New York, when the battle of Manassas was fought, are made major-generals, and the former put in command over Wise in Virginia, and all the generals in North Carolina. Ripley, another Northern general, was sent to South Carolina, and Winder, from Maryland, has been allowed to play the despot in Richmond and Petersburg. Washington was maligned.
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 27 (search)
e Assistant Secretary's room to-day for file, which was written April 22d, 1861, by R. H. Smith to Judge Campbell--a private letter-warning him not to come to Mobile, as nothing was thought of but secession, and it was believed Judge C. had used his influence with Mr. Seward to prevent secession. The writer deprecates civil war. And quite as curiously, the Examiner to-day contains what purports to be Admiral Buchanan's correspondence with the Lincoln government, two letters, the first in April, 1861, tendering his resignation, and the last on May 4th, begging, if it had not been done already, that the government would not accept his resignation. May 6 The excitement has subsided, as troops come pouring in, and many improvised cavalry companies go out in quest of the fox — who has vanished we know not exactly whither. It is believed we have taken 15,000 or 20,000 prisoners, and that the enemy's killed, wounded, and prisoners must reach the appalling number of 40,000. On
or men in the whole army would have passed a regulation inspection. In the glory of that day Logan's men forgot the fathomless mud of Cairo, the sleet, mud, and water around Forts Henry and Donelson, the heat and long siege of Vicksburg, the rugged mountains of Kenesaw, the siege of Atlanta, the swamps and corduroys of Georgia and the Carolinas, the burning suns, and pitiless storms of winter, the marches, the battles, the suffering and carnage of the long four years intervening between April, 1861, and May, 1865. General Logan forgot that he had been relieved unjustly of the command of the Army of the Tennessee after his great victory at Atlanta and speedy avenging of the death of McPherson, July 22, 1864. All were going home soon and only thought and dreamed of bliss, like Campbell's soldier. Even in the dead of the night sweet visions they saw, and thrice ere the morning they dreamed them again. From morning till night, for two days, these victorious cohorts were marching
e day of his death in 1864, on the battle-field of Opequan, in front of Winchester, while gallantly leading his division under my command, my esteem and affection were sustained and intensified by the same strong bonds that drew me to him in these early days in Oregon. After the events Just narrated I continued on duty at the post of Yamhill, experiencing the usual routine of garrison life without any incidents of much interest, down to the breaking out of the war of the rebellion in April, 1861. The news of the firing on Fort Sumter brought us an excitement which overshadowed all else, and though we had no officers at the post who sympathized with the rebellion, there were several in our regiment — the Fourth Infantry--who did, and we were considerably exercised as to the course they might pursue, but naturally far more so concerning the disposition that would be made of the regiment during the conflict. In due time orders came for the regiment to go East, and my company we
ier of the Mexican war, was chief of artillery, and as such had a general supervision of that arm, though the batteries, either as units or in sections, were assigned to the different divisions in campaign. Each one of my division commanders was a soldier by profession. Torbert graduated from the Military Academy in 1855, and was commissioned in the infantry, in which arm he saw much service on the frontier, in Florida, and on the Utah expedition. At the beginning of hostilities in April, 1861, he was made a colonel of New Jersey volunteers, and from that position was promoted in the fall of 1862 to be a brigadier-general, thereafter commanding a brigade of infantry in the Army of the Potomac till, in the redistribution of generals, after Grant came to the East, he was assigned to the First Cavalry Division. Gregg graduated in 1855 also, and was appointed to the First Dragoons, with which regiment, up to the breaking out of the war, he saw frontier service extending from Fo
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Index. (search)
n army, 316-17; proposals for employment of as Confederate infantry, 19-20. Nesbit, Col., 221 New Haven, Conn., 25, 36-39, 44, 152, 174-75, 200, 355 New Kent Court House, Va., 87-88. New Orleans, La., 185, 248 New York, N. Y., 25, 33-36, 44, 49, 92, 354 New York Journal of Commerce, 37-38. Newton, Hubert Anson, 351 Nicknames for generals, 18 Night blindness, 348-49. North Anna Campaign, 266-69. North Carolina Infantry: 5th Regiment, 80 Lincoln, Abraham: his April 1861 call --for troops, 31, 145, 189; mentioned, 163-64, 180, 192, 206, 287 Logan, John Alexander, 26, 28 Longstreet, James: mentioned, 106- 107, 122-24, 188, 231, 272, 274, 340; troops of, 41, 59, 127, 192, 219; wounded at Wilderness, 246-48. Louisa Court House, Va., 90 Louisiana Guard Artillery, 197 Louisiana Infantry: 9th Regiment, 212-13. Louisiana Tigers, 80-81, 172, 201 Lounsbury, Thomas Raynesford, 34 Lutherans, 206 McCarthy, Daniel Stephens, 294-96. McCarthy,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
Reports of Special Committees, Speeches in Congress, &c. (Many of these documents are very rare, and of great value.) Report of Evidence taken before a Joint Special Committee of both Houses of the Confederate Congress to Investigate the Affairs of the Navy Department. Report of the Roanoke Island Investigating Committee. Confederate States Navy Register of 1862. Confederate States Navy Register to January 1st, 1863. Ordinances adopted by the Convention of. Virginia in secret session in April and May, 1861. Convention between the Commonwealth of Virginia and the Confederate States of America. Message of Governor Moore, of Louisiana, to the General Assembly, November, 1861. Rules and Directions for Proceedings. in the Confederate States Patent Office. Jomini's Practice of War. Richmond: West & Johnston, 1863. Proceedings of the Confederate States Congress on the announcement of the death of Col. Francis S. Bartow, of the Army of the Confederate States, and late a delegate in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Decision of the Supreme Court of Tennessee that the Confederacy was de jure as well as de facto-opinion of Judge Turney. (search)
nstituents of the aggregate composing the State. A State having a right may employ all the means necessary to the enjoyment of that right, and it is a gross solecism to say that the State may lawfully have a thing, but may not lawfully engage its citizens to createthat thing, or that its citizens may not voluntarily do so. There is no conflict of opinion between this holding and the case of Puryear, adm'r, v. McGavock et als., manuscript opinion by Judge Deaderick, as the transaction in that case was in April, 1861, before action was taken by the State in the matter of separation. Reverse the judgment. Note.-The opinion above was delivered at Nashville, December term, 1872, and introduced here as conclusive of the numerous cases, still pending in the courts of the State, involving the principles it determines. It was recently reaffirmed, without a written opinion, in the case of The Union Bank of Tennessee v. Alexander Pattison, at Jackson, September term, 1876.-J. C. M.
him. Major Von Steinhaus, Capt. Botticher, and Capt. Camp, of the Sixty-eighth regiment of New York volunteers; Lieut. Lombard, Battalion Adjutant Eighth Illinois cavalry, and Assist. Surg. Williams, First New York artillery, were, by the order of President Lincoln, struck from the roll of the army, for being captured while straggling, without authority, beyond the National lines. Com. Paulding published a letter giving an account of the destruction of the Norfolk Navy-Yard, in April, 1861.--(Doc. 148.) Henry Kuhl, Hamilton W. Windon, and Conrad Kuhl, having been tried by court-martial, in Western Virginia, and found guilty of murdering a Union soldier, the two first named were sentenced to be hung, and the third to wear a ball and chain, and perform hard labor during the war. Major-Gen. Fremont, in an order issued this day, confirmed the findings and sentence of the court. The hanging is to take place at Suttonville, on the ninth of May, and the ball and chain individu
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