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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 58 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 46 46 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 28 28 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 17 17 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 10 10 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. You can also browse the collection for April, 1861 AD or search for April, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Pegram was in Western Virginia, watching the Federals in that direction, who, under General McClellan, were threatening to advance circuitously and take us in the rear. Such, in brief, might be said to be the state of things in the middle of April, 1861. I now proceed to a simple narration of facts, of which, for the most part, I was an eye-witness, throughout most of the engagements of the war. And in the first place let me observe, that prior to the proclamation of April, 1861, in whicApril, 1861, in which President Lincoln warned us to disperse to our homes in thirty days, there were many who fondly expected that common-sense would rule in the councils of the North, and that the Government would not force a war upon their brethren of the South. We were all mistaken; and when the proclamation was read on the bulletin boards of the telegraph offices in every town, crowds perused the document with roars of laughter, and derisive cheers for the great rail-splitter Abraham! Companies were formed
e left nipple: death must have been almost instantaneous. Major-General Nathaniel Lyon was a Connecticut Yankee of the abolition type; not more than forty-five years of age, small in stature, wiry, active, with dark hair and complexion, small black eyes; fond of military pomp, but an excellent, though restless, and ambitious officer. He entered the United States army as Second Lieutenant, July first, 1841; was made Captain by brevet, August twentieth, 1847; and arrived in St. Louis in April, 1861, having been sent from his post far in the South-West to stand a court-martial on the charge of peculation. His great activity in aiding the suppression of Southern feeling in St. Louis endeared him to the abolitionists; he seized the arsenal, erected defences round the city, disarmed the Camp Jackson Southern sympathizers, and rapidly rose from the rank of captain to that of Major-General in two months. His cruelty to all suspected of Southern sentiment, and in the administration of aff
all agreed that it was now impossible to surround McClellan, for he was near his transports, and had a large flotilla of gunboats, with ports open and ready to bombard our army, should we approach too near. Had we but possessed gunboats on the river, we might have achieved wonders; but destitute of this arm, we could only follow as far as practicable, and do our best. From an officer among the prisoners, I heard an incident related, which may be considered worthy of remembrance. In April, 1861, when General Scott made a great fuss in the papers about the peril of Washington, among the first to volunteer their services was the celebrated Seventh regiment of New-York City--a corps that was the pet of the whole country, being, perhaps, better drilled than any other volunteer regiment in the world. They mustered about eight hundred bayonets; had four or five fancy suits; the best of arms; the best blood of New-York was enrolled in their rank and file-in short, the men of this regi