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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official correspondence of Governor Letcher, of Virginia. (search)
pids at Washington to attempt a scheme of blockade and border foray, starvation, &c., by cutting off commerce? I need not say that it will afford me the utmost pleasure to be of any service to you in this part of the State, and I hope you will not hesitate to call upon me. Your communications, when necessary, shall be held as strictly confidential. My best respects for Mrs. L., if she is with you. With high esteem, Your obedient servant, Geo. W. Summers. Executive Department, May 10th, 1861. My Dear Sir — Your favor of May 3d has been received. Deeming it important that the suggestions you have been kind enough to make should be made known to General Lee, who has been entrusted with the defence of the State, I have taken the liberty of submitting your letter to him. General Lee concurs fully with you in the views you have presented, and the steps taken by him for the protection and defence of your section of the State coincide almost exactly with the course you have
you the most important command and trust, on your arrival here. Sidney is appointed to the Military Academy. I hope soon to see you; and, with a heart glowing with pride and pleasure for my commander and friend, I remain, ever yours, F. J. Porter, Assistant Adjutant-General. To General A. S. Johnston, San Francisco, California. The following letter, addressed to Major Porter by an officer, then and since very prominent in the United States Army, needs no comment: Washington, May 10, 1861. dear Porter: General Johnston has resigned. He did so, April 9, 1861! Sumner's orders were not known here till near that time. He left Washington April 1st. Johnston asked that a successor might be sent to relieve him I His letter did not show that he had any idea that he was suspected, or that any one was sent to relieve him-says that he has heard that Johnston has been talking, very openly, secession doctrines in San Francisco. The thing is all up. His resignation is accepted, a
o proud! Can it be possible that it is no longer our Capitol? And are our countrymen, under its very eaves, making mighty preparation to drain our hearts' blood? And must this Union, which I was taught to revere, be rent asunder? Once I thought such a suggestion sacrilege; but now that it is dismembered, I trust it may never, never be reunited. We must be a separate people-our nationality must be different, to insure lasting peace and good-will. Why cannot we part in peace? May 10, 1861. Since writing last, I have been busy, very busy, arranging and rearranging. We are now hoping that Alexandria will not be a landing-place for the enemy, but that the forts will be attacked. In that case, they would certainly be repulsed, and we could stay quietly at home. To view the progress of events from any point will be sad enough, but it would be more bearable at our own home, and surrounded by our family and friends. With the supposition that we may remain, and that the lad
May 10. The Confederate Secretary of War invested R. E. Lee with the control of the rebel forces of Va., by the following order: Montgomery, May 10, 1861. To Major-Gen. R. E. Lee: To prevent confusion, you will assume the control of the forces of the Confederate States in Virginia, and assign them to such duties as you may indicate, until further orders; for which this will be your authority. I. P. Walker, Secretary of War. --National Intelligencer, May 15. The Charleston News of this day contains the prayer of the Rev. James Bardwell, at the opening of the Tennessee Legislature on the 25th of April.--(Doc. 149.) In addition to the new Military Departments of Washington, Annapolis, and Pennsylvania, the States of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois will constitute a fourth, subdivided into several others, to be called the Department of the Ohio. Major-General McClellan, Ohio Volunteers, is assigned to its command; headquarters, Cincinnati. The President, by ge
cott; Perhaps not better, but full as well; Rather than live, so I would be shot, Picked of my feathers, boiled in a pot; Rather would list to my funeral knell, Be dead and be buried and go to — well, Send me to climes where orange trees bloom, There let me rest my wearied head, Fan my feathers with sweet perfume; Let music of honest contentment come, With manly hearts I find my home, And sleep in their shade when dead. Bird of the broad and sweeping wing, They have swept your nest with a dirty broom, Tarnished your glorious covering; From Tammany Hall I hear them sing, Weed and Morgan and Governor King, Vanderbilt, Law, Beecher, and Tyng-- Priest and pirate, together they come. Arise, proud Eagle I thy bird of fame I Phoenix-like soar from thy burning nest; Not wrong nor oppression thy spirit can tame, Or drive away truth from thy noble breast. Come, proud Eagle! our old bird, come! And live in an honest Southern home. Charles Dullness. St. Charles Hotel, New-Orleans, May 10, 1861
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 17: events in and near the National Capital. (search)
h Carolina vigilance committees generally used had been applied. The same. With this alleged authority, Kane and Lowe, accompanied by Mayor Brown and his brother, hastened to the office of Charles Howard, the President of the Board of Police, who was waiting for them, when that officer and the Mayor issued orders for the destruction of the bridges. Communication from the Mayor of Baltimore with the Mayor and Board of Police of Baltimore City: Document G, Maryland House of Delegates, May 10, 1861. The work was soon accomplished. A gang of lawless men hastened out to the Canton bridge, two or three miles from the city, on the Destruction of the Bridge over gunpowder Creek. this is from a sketch of the Bridge made by the author in November, 1861, from the Baltimore side of gunpowder Creek. The picture of conflagration has been added to show the relative position of the portion of the Bridge that was burnt at that time. Philadelphia, Wilmington, and Baltimore Railway, an
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 18: the Capital secured.--Maryland secessionists Subdued.--contributions by the people. (search)
y of gunpowder said to be stored in a church in Baltimore for the use of the secessionists. To do this, Butler must use force; and as no word that came from the General-in-chief forbade his going into Baltimore with his troops, he prepared to do so. Already a party of the Sixth Massachusetts had performed good service, in connection with a company of the New York Eighth and two guns of the Boston Light Artillery, all under Major Cook, in capturing Winans's steam-gun at Ellicott's Mills, May 10, 1861. together with Dickinson, See page 440. Winans was an aged man, a thorough secessionist, and worth, it was estimated, about fifteen millions of dollars. It was reported that he contributed largely in aid of the revolutionists; and that, among other things for their use, he manufactured five thousand pikes in his iron-works. He was arrested on a charge of treason, but the lenient Government released him. the inventor. Butler had promised Colonel Jones, of the Sixth, which had fought
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 19: events in the Mississippi Valley.--the Indians. (search)
all circumstances, and under any administration (regardless of party politics), against all assailants at home and abroad. The course of Clay and Webster toward the administration of General Jackson, in the days of nullification, presents a noble and worthy example for all true patriots. He said in conclusion. If we hope to regain and perpetuate the ascendency of our party, we should never forget that a man can not be a true Democrat unless he is a loyal patriot. This letter was dated May 10, 1861. His last coherent utterances were exhortations to his children and his countrymen to stand by the Constitution and the Government. The Legislature of Illinois appropriated three millions of dollars for war purposes, and authorized the immediate Stephen A. Douglas. organization of the entire militia force of the State, consisting of all able-bodied men between the ages of eighteen and forty-five years. Michigan was equally aroused by the call of the President. He asked of her one r
as one of their grounds for asserting their independence that the King of Great Britain had abdicated government here, by declaring us out of his protection, and waging war upon us. The people and Government of the Northern States of the late Union have acted in the same manner toward Missouri, and have dissolved, by war, the connection heretofore existing between her and them. The General Assembly of Missouri, the recognized political department of her Government, by an act approved May 10th, 1861, entitled, An act to authorize the Governor of the State of Missouri to suppress rebellion and repel invasion, has vested in the Governor, in respect to the rebellion and invasion now carried on in Missouri by the Government and people of the Northern States and their allies, power and authority to take such measures, as in his judgment he may deem necessary or proper, to repel such invasion or put down such rebellion. Now, therefore, by virtue of the authority in me vested by said ac
as one of their grounds for asserting their independence, that the King of Great Britain had abdicated government here by declaring us out of his protection, and waging war upon us. The people and Government of the Northern States of the late Union have acted in the same manner toward Missouri, and have dissolved, by war, the connection heretofore existing between her and them. The General Assembly of Missouri, the recognized political department of her government, by an act approved May 10, 1861, entitled, An act to authorize the Governor of the State of Missouri to suppress rebellion and repel invasion, has vested in the Governor, in respect to the rebellion and invasion now carried on in Missouri by the Government and people of the Northern States and their allies, the authority to take such measures as in his judgment he may deem necessary or proper to repel such invasion or put down such rebellion. Now, therefore, by virtue of the authority in me vested by said act, I, Cla
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