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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Responsibilities of the first Bull Run. (search)
tes from an official letter to me from General Cooper, dated June 13th, 1861, which began thus: The opinions expressed by Major Whiting in his letter to you, and on which you have indorsed your concurrence, have been duly considered. You had been heretofore instructed to exercise your discretion as to retiring from your position at Harper's Ferry. This letter of Major Whiting to General Johnston, and General Johnston's letter (probably referred to as the indorsement), are both dated May 28th, 1861. The phrase of General Cooper, You had been heretofore instructed, should have read either, You had been theretofore [before May 28th] instructed, or, You have been heretofore [before June 13th] instructed. The latter is probably what was meant, as the only letter of instructions to General Johnston received at Harper's Ferry giving him permission to use his discretion which is to be found in the Official Records, is the one of June 7th from General Lee, in which he says: It is hoped t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 23: the War in Missouri.-doings of the Confederate Congress. --Affairs in Baltimore.--Piracies. (search)
ond, with the intention, it is said, of taking command of the Confederate troops in Virginia in person, Speech of Alexander H. Stephens at Atlanta, Georgia, May 28, 1861. accompanied by his favorite aid, Wigfall, of Texas, See pages 81 and 826. and Robert Toombs, his Secretary of State. His journey was a continuous ovation.han ours are with President Davis, and the trip from Montgomery to Richmond will ever be remembered with delight by all who witnessed it. Richmond Examiner, May 28, 1861 North Carolina mounted Rifleman. Davis and his party were met at Petersburg by Governor Letcher and the Mayor (Mayo) of Richmond; and he was escorted into his future capital by soldiers and civilians, and out to the Fair grounds, where he addressed a great crowd of people, May 28, 1861. and declared that, to the last breath of his life, he was wholly their own. On the evening of the 31st he was serenaded, when he took the occasion to utter that memorable speech, so characteristi
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
trality issued by Queen Victoria, in which the subjects of Great Britain were forbidden to endeavor to break a blockade lawfully and effectually established. May 18-19, 1861. Shots exchanged between U. S. S. Freeborn and Monticello and the Confed. battery at Sewell's Point, Va. U. S. S. Harriet Lane arrives off Charleston. May 26, 1861. U. S. S. Brooklyn commenced the blockade of the Mississippi River. Blockade of Mobile, Ala., commenced by U. S. S. Powhatan. May 28, 1861. U. S. S. Minnesota begins real blockade of Charleston. Blockade of Savannah initiated by U. S. gunboat Union. May 31, 1861. U. S. S. Freeborn, Anacostia, Pawnee, and Resolute attacked Confed. batteries at Aquia Creek, Va. June, 1861. June 27, 1861. Engagement between U. S. gunboats Freeborn and Reliance and Confed. batteries at Mathias Point, Va., Commander Ward of the Freeborn killed. July, 1861. July 2, 1861. U. S. S. South Carolina begins bloc
not only efficient, but aggressively honest public servants. Marshalling the Federal volunteers Officer and sergeant in 1861 men of the sixth Vermont near Washington A hollow-square maneuver for the new soldiers This regiment was organized at Bangor, Me., for three months service, and left the State for Willett's Point, N. Y., May 14, 1861. Such was the enthusiasm of the moment that it was mustered into the United States service, part for two and part for three years, May 28, 1861. It moved to Washington on May 30th. The first Camp of the regiment was on Meridian till, near Washington, till July 1st. The live-long days were spent in constant drill, drill, drill during this period. McClellan was fashioning the new levies into an army. The total population of the Northern States in 1860 was 21,184,305. New England's population was 3,135,283, or about one-seventh of the whole. New England's troops numbered 363,162, over one-tenth of its population, practically o
Marshalling the Federal volunteers Officer and sergeant in 1861 men of the sixth Vermont near Washington A hollow-square maneuver for the new soldiers This regiment was organized at Bangor, Me., for three months service, and left the State for Willett's Point, N. Y., May 14, 1861. Such was the enthusiasm of the moment that it was mustered into the United States service, part for two and part for three years, May 28, 1861. It moved to Washington on May 30th. The first Camp of the regiment was on Meridian till, near Washington, till July 1st. The live-long days were spent in constant drill, drill, drill during this period. McClellan was fashioning the new levies into an army. The total population of the Northern States in 1860 was 21,184,305. New England's population was 3,135,283, or about one-seventh of the whole. New England's troops numbered 363,162, over one-tenth of its population, practically one-seventh the total muster of forces raised in the North durin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
est Virginia......May 13, 1861 Engagement at Sewell's Point, Va.......May 18-19, 1861 Ordinance of secession of North Carolina adopted in convention, vote unanimous......May 21, 1861 United States troops advance into Virginia and occupy Arlington Heights and Alexandria......May 24, 1861 Col. E. E. Ellsworth, of the New York Fire Zouaves, shot at Alexandria, Va.......May 24, 1861 Gen. Irwin McDowell, U. S. A., assumes command of the Department of Northeastern Virginia......May 28, 1861 Grafton, W. Va., occupied by United States troops......May 30, 1861 Ordinance of secession of the State of Tennessee adopted by the legislature......June 8, 1861 Virginia State troops transferred to the Confederate government......June 8, 1861 Engagement at Big Bethel, Va.......June 10, 1861 Governor of Missouri calls for 50,000 State militia to repel invasion......June 12, 1861 Harper's Ferry abandoned by the Confederates......June 15, 1861 General Banks arrests Geor
C. HicksMar. 10, 1857. 20,825G. H. SouleJuly 6, 1858. 20,954J. H. MerrillJuly 20, 1858. *30,446B. F. HenryOct. 16, 1860. 30,714J. BoyntonNov. 27, 1860. 32,032J. H. MerrillApr. 9, 1861. 32,033J. H. MerrillApr. 9, 1861. 32,451J. H. MerrillMay 28, 1861. 33,536J. H. MerrillOct. 22, 1861. 33,847D. MooreDec. 3, 1861. 34,859C. B. HoldenApr. 1, 1862. 35,284W. H. ElliotMay 13, 1862. 35,989C. C. BrandJuly 29, 1862. *36,174J. Q. A. ScottAug. 12, 1862. 36,721J. V. MeigsOct. 21, 1862. 36,779S. A. H. PalmireOct. 24, 1854. 11,938F. MatonNov. 14, 1854. 15,522A. N. NewtonAug. 12, 1856. 16,072C. SharpsNov. 11, 1856. 18,634J. Durell GreeneNov. 17, 1857. 25,470J. RiderSept. 13, 1859. 26,475B. BurtonDec. 20, 1859. 32,450J. H. MerrillMay 28, 1861. 34,084F. G. WoodardJan. 7, 1862. 34,422J. D. GreeneFeb. 18, 1862. 34,706T. TwickelerMar. 18, 1862. 34,911J. L. SwanApr. 8, 1862. 35,107J. P. MarshallApr. 29, 1862. 36,681W. TerryOct. 14, 1862. 36,854J. C. NyeNov. 4, 1862. 37,354J. C.
21,672HarrisOct. 5, 1858. 21,713WhiteOct. 5, 1858. 21,722HendrickOct. 5, 1858. 22,148PerryNov. 23, 1858. 22,719Fosket et al.Jan. 25, 1859. 24,098CarhartMay 24, 1859. 24,395McCurdyJune 14, 1859. 26,201PearsonNov. 22, 1859. 32,415CooperMay 28, 1861. 32,456StoakesMay 28, 1861. 32,782NortonJuly 9, 1861. 32,785RaymondJuly 30, 1861. 33,085HodgkinsAug. 20, 1861. 34,932WilliamsApr. 8, 1862. 38,450PalmerMay 5, 1863. 45,236FolsomNov. 29, 1864. 46,064BartlettJan. 31, 1865. (Reissue.)May 28, 1861. 32,782NortonJuly 9, 1861. 32,785RaymondJuly 30, 1861. 33,085HodgkinsAug. 20, 1861. 34,932WilliamsApr. 8, 1862. 38,450PalmerMay 5, 1863. 45,236FolsomNov. 29, 1864. 46,064BartlettJan. 31, 1865. (Reissue.)2,210BartlettMar. 27, 1866. 54,816GoodspeedMay 15, 1866. 56,990PiperAug. 7, 1866. 60,669BartramJan. 1, 1867. 61,176DriggsJan. 15, 1867. (Reissue.)2,745HodgkinsAug. 20, 1867. (Reissue.)2,746HodgkinsAug. 20, 1867. 68,196HillsAug. 27, 1867. 69,666HodgkinsOct. 8, 1867. 76,385BartlettApr. 7, 1868. 80,889WillmarthAug. 11, 1868. 81,821RowleySept. 1, 1868. 83,492HancockOct. 27, 1868. 83,750Willmarth et al.Nov. 3, 1868. 84,959MyersDec. 15, 1868. 86,057CanfieldJan. 19, 1869. 86,695
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, California, 1861 (search)
near Fort HumboldtUNITED STATES--4th and 6th Infantry (Detachments). April 14-15: Skirmishes, Van Deusen Creek, near Mad RiverUNITED STATES--4th and 7th Infantry (Detachments) and Volunteers. May 23: Skirmish, Larabee's RanchUNITED STATES--4th Infantry (Detachment) and Volunteers. May 26-June 17: Operations on Mad and Eel RiversUNITED STATES--4th and 7th Infantry (Detachments) and Volunteers. May 26: Skirmish, South Fork, Eel RiverUNITED STATES--4th Infantry (Detachment) and Volunteers. May 28: Skirmish, South Fork, Eel RiverUNITED STATES--7th Infantry (Detachment) and Volunteers. May 30: Skirmish, Keatuck CreekUNITED STATES--7th Infantry (Detachment) and Volunteers. June 2: Skirmish, Larabee's HouseUNITED STATES--4th Infantry (Detachment) and Volunteers. June 4: Skirmish, Eel River, opposite Bell SpringUNITED STATES--7th Infantry (Detachment) and Volunteers. June 8: Skirmish, Larabee's HouseUNITED STATES--4th Infantry (Detachment) and Volunteers. June 14: Skirmish, South For
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
ding, Ark., January 10-16, 1864. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 2, 1864. Clinton February 5. Mustered out June 4, 1864, expiration of term. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 8th Illinois Infantry. Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 71 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 71 Enlisted men by disease. Total 146. 18th Illinois Regiment Infantry. Organized at Aurora, Ill., and mustered into State service May 19, and into U. S. service May 28, 1861. Moved to Bird's Point, Mo., June 24, and duty there till August 26. Moved to Mound City August 26, and duty there till October 5. Moved to Cairo, Ill., October 5, and duty there till February, 1862. Attached to District of Cairo, to October, 1861. 1st Brigade, District of Cairo, to February, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, District of Cairo, February, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, District of West Tenn., March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 1st District, We
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