Your search returned 87 results in 30 document sections:

1 2 3
y would end with its abolition. There is nothing in the Constitution to prevent the abolition of the Board. You have met, gentlemen, in the midst of civil war, but I truest you may yet be assembled under happier auspices, when the strife shall be over, and peace and prosperity be restored to this once happy country. All which is respectfully submitted. F. H. Pierpont. Documents accompanying the Governors; message. Commonwealth of Virginia, Executive Department, Wheeling, June 21, 1861. To His Excellency the President of the United States: sir:--Reliable information has been received at this department from various parts of the State, that large numbers of evil-minded persons have banded together in military organizations with intent to overthrow the Government of the State, and for that purpose have called to their aid like-minded persons from other States, who, in pursuance of such call, have invaded this commonwealth. They are now making war on the loyal people
Secretary of War that all persons in the employ of Government, respect and further the inquiries and objects of the commission to the utmost of their ability. Mr. Frederick Law Oimsted, of New York, consents to serve as its resident secretary and general agent at Washington. Donations and subscriptions in aid of its object are earnestly solicited. They should be addressed to its treasurer, George T. Strong, 68 Wall Street, New York. Office of Sanitary Commission, Treasury Building, June 21, 1861. Henry W. Bellows, President, New York. Prof. A. D. Bache, Vice-Pres., Washington. Elisha Harris, M. D. Cor. Secretary, N. Y. Geo. W. Cullum, U. S. A., Washington. Alexander E. Shiras, U. S. A., Washington. Robt. C. Wood, M. D., U. S. A., Washington. Wm. H. Van Buren, M. D., New York. Wolcott Gibbs, M. D., New York. Samuel G. Howe, M. D., Boston. Cornelius R. Agnew, M. D., New York. J. S. Newberry, M. D., Cleveland. Geo. T. Strong, New York. Freder
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them., Chapter 3: private letters of Gen. McClellan to his wife. [June 21 to July 21, 1861.] (search)
Chapter 3: private letters of Gen. McClellan to his wife. [June 21 to July 21, 1861.] Marietta, June 21, 1861. I must snatch a few moments to write you. We got off at 11.30 yesterday morning, and had a continual ovation all along the road. At every station where we stopped crowds had assembled to see the young general gray-headed old men and women, mothers holding up their children to take my hand, girls, boys, all sorts, cheering and crying, God bless you! I never went through such a scene in my life, and never expect to go through such another one. You would have been surprised at the excitement. At Chillicothe the ladies had prepared a dinner, and I had to be trotted through. They gave me about twenty beautiful bouquets and almost killed me with kindness. The trouble will be to fill their expectations, they seem to be so high. I could hear them say, He is our own general ; Look at him, how young he is ; He will thrash them ; He'll do, etc., etc. ad infinitum. . . .
ians, and their vehement colonel marched away along the tow-path to join Stone's great division farther up stream. Three regiments, already famous for their drill and discipline had preceded them, the First Minnesota, the Fifteenth Seventeenth New York. New York's Seventeenth Infantry Volunteers entered the war as the Westchester Chasseurs. It was organized at New York City and mustered in for two years, Colonel H. Seymour Lansing in command. The regiment left for Washington June 21, 1861, and was stationed near Miner's Hill, just across the District of Columbia line, a mile and a half from Falls Church. It fought on the Peninsula, at the second Bull Run, at Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville, and took part in the famous mud march January 20 to 24, 1863. On May 13, 1863, the three-years men were detached and assigned to a battalion of New York volunteers, and on June 23, 1863, were transferred to the 146th New York Infantry. The regiment was mustered out Ju
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
P., Sept. 17, 1861. Walker, L. M., April 11, 1862. Walker, Wm. S., Oct. 30, 1862. Waterhouse, R., Mar. 17, 1865. Watie, Stand, May 6, 1864. Waul, Thomas N., Sept. 18, 1863. Wayne, Henry C., Dec. 16, 1861. Weisiger, D. A., July 30, 1864. Wharton, G. C., July 8, 1863. Whitfield, John W., May 9, 1863. Wickham, W. C., Sept. 1, 1863. Wigfall, Louis T., Oct. 2, 1861. Williams, John S., April 16, 1862. Wilson, C. C., Nov. 16, 1863. Winder, Chas. S., Mar. 1, 1862. Winder, John H., June 21, 1861. Wise, Henry A., June 5, 1861. Woffard, Wm. T., Jan. 17, 1863. Wood, S. A. M., Jan. 7, 1862. Wright, Marcus J., Dec. 13, 1862. Zollicoffer, Felix K., July 9, 1861. Brigadier-generals of artillery, provisional army Alexander, Ed. P., Feb. 26, 1864. Long, A. L., Sept. 21, 1863. Walker, R. L., Feb. 18, 1865. Brigadier-General, (Commissary General) provisional army St. John, Isaac M., Feb. 16, 1865. Brigadier-generals, (special Appointments) provisional army Imboden, Jo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harvey, Sir John 1829- (search)
Harvey, Sir John 1829- Colonial governor; appointed governor of Virginia in 1627; arrived there in 1629; and served till 1635, when he was impeached by the Assembly. Failing to pacify his opponents. he returned to England, where his case was examined by the privy council, and he was restored to his office, were he remained till 1639. Hascall, Milo Smith, military officer; born in Le Roy, N. Y., Aug. 5, 1829; Harvard College in 1720. graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1852. He captured the first Confederate flag at Philippi, Va., June 21. 1861; participated in many important actions; and was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers in April, 1862.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tennessee, (search)
1861 Governor Harris orders the seizure of $75,000 worth of Tennessee bonds and $5,000 in cash belonging to the United States government, in possession of the collector at Nashville......April 29, 1861 Majority vote of the State favors a declaration of independence for Tennessee and the acceptance of the provisional government of the Confederate States......June 8, 1861 Eastern Tennessee Union convention at Greeneville declares its opposition to the Confederate government......June 21, 1861 Governor Harris proclaims Tennessee out of the Union......June 24, 1861 Confederate commissary and ordnance stores at Nashville destroyed by fire......Dec. 22, 1861 Commodore Foote defeats Gen. Lloyd Tilghman and captures Fort Henry......Feb. 6, 1862 Bombardment of Fort Donelson begins Feb. 13; fort surrendered to General Grant by General Buckner, with 13,829 prisoners......Feb. 16, 1862 Seat of government removed to Memphis......Feb. 20, 1862 Confederates evacuate Nash
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Brigadier-Generals of the Confederate States Army, alphabetically arranged. (search)
n. J. E. JohnstonMarch 7, 1862.March 1, 1862. March 6, 1862. Killed at Cedar Run August 9, 1862; brigade composed of the 2d, 4th, 5th, 27th and 33d Virginia regiments, Jackson's division, Army of Northern Virginia. 468Winder, John H.Maryland June 21, 1861.June 21, 1861. Aug. 29, 1861. In command of prison camps at Andersonville, Millen, &c., &c. 469Wise, Henry A.Virginia June 5, 1861.June 5, 1861. Aug. 29, 1861, and Feb. 17, 1864. Brigade consisted of the 26th, 34th, 46th and 59th Virginia reJune 21, 1861. Aug. 29, 1861. In command of prison camps at Andersonville, Millen, &c., &c. 469Wise, Henry A.Virginia June 5, 1861.June 5, 1861. Aug. 29, 1861, and Feb. 17, 1864. Brigade consisted of the 26th, 34th, 46th and 59th Virginia regiments and the Light Batteries of Captains McComas and Armistead, Army of Northern Virginia. 470Withers, Jones M.Alabama July 10, 1861.July 10, 1861. Aug. 29, 1861. Promoted Major-General April 6, 1862; commanding Reserve corps, Army of the Mississippi, composed of the brigades of Gardner, Chalmers, Jackson and Manigault. 471Wood, S. A. M.Alabama Jan. 7, 1862.Jan. 7, 1862. Jan. 14, 1862. Brigade composed of the 7th Alabama, 5th, 7th and 8th Arkansas and 44th Tennessee regiments, the bat
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Commissioned and Warrant officers of the Navy of the Cofederate States January 1, 1864. (search)
rida March 26, 1861.Jan. 7, 1864.May 13, 1863.Special service. Captain in Pro. NavyJohn R. TuckerD. C.Virginia June 10, 1861.Jan. 7, 1864.May 18, 1863.Commanding naval squadron at Charleston. CommanderS. S. LeeVirginiaVirginia June 11, 1861.June 21, 1861.March 26, 1861.Commanding at Drewry's Bluff. CommanderWilliam C. WhittleVirginiaVirginia June 11, 1861.June 21, 1861.March 26, 1861.Waiting orders. CommanderRobert D. ThorburnVirginiaVirginia June 15, 1861.Oct. 23, 1862.March 26, 1861.NavalJune 21, 1861.March 26, 1861.Waiting orders. CommanderRobert D. ThorburnVirginiaVirginia June 15, 1861.Oct. 23, 1862.March 26, 1861.Naval station, Savannah. CommanderRobert G. RobbVirginiaVirginia June 10, 1861.Oct. 23, 1862.March 26, 1861.Commanding navy yard, Rocketts. CommanderW. W. HunterPennsylvaniaLouisiana June 6, 1861.June 6, 1861.March 26, 1861.Commanding squadron, Savannah. CommanderMurray MasonVirginiaVirginia June 10, 1861.Oct. 23, 1862.March 26, 1861.Naval rendezvous, Richmond. CommanderE. FarrandNew YorkFlorida March 26, 1861.June 6, 1861.March 26, 1861.Special service. CommanderC. H. McBlairMarylandMaryland O
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Massachusetts Volunteers. (search)
the Salient at Spottsylvania C. H. May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. Jericho Mills May 24. Line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-10. Left front June 10 and ordered home for muster out. Mustered out June 21, 1864. Regiment lost during service 15 Officers and 194 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 66 Enlisted men by disease. Total 278. 10th Massachusetts Regiment Infantry. Organized at Springfield June 21, 1861. Moved to Washington, D. C., July 25-28. Attached to Couch's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Couch's Brigade, Buell's (Keyes') Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to September, 1862. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 6th Army Corps, to October, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 6th Army Corps, to January, 1864. 4th Brigade, 2nd Division, 6th Army Corps, to July, 1864. Service.
1 2 3