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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 1 1 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 1 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 1 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
R. E. Lee's command. Losses: Union 13 killed, 40 wounded. Confed. 20 killed, 10 wounded, 50 prisoners. Confed. Gen. R. S. Garnett killed. July 16, 1861: Millsville or Wentzville, Mo. Losses: Union 7 killed, 1 wounded. Confed. 7 killed. July 17, 1861: Fulton, Mo. Losses: Union 1 killed, 15 wounded. July 16, 1861: Scarey Creek, W. Va. Losses: Union 9 killed, 38 wounded. July 16, 1861: Martinsburg, Mo. Losses: Union 1 killed, 1 wounded. July 18, 1861: Blackburn's Ford, Va. Union, 1st Mass., 2d and 3d Mich., 12th N. Y., Detachment of 2d U. S. Cav., Battery E 3d U. S. Artil. Confed., 5th, 11th N. C., 2d, 3d, 7th S. C., 1st, 7th, 11th, 17th, 24th Va., 7th La., 13th Miss. Losses: Union 19 killed, 38 wounded. Confed. 15 killed, 53 wounded. July 21, 1861: Bull Run or Manassas, Va. Union, 2d Me., 2d N. H., 2d Vt., 1st, 4th, and 5th Mass., 1st and 2d R. I., 1st, 2d, and 3d Conn., 8th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 16th, 18th, 27th,
e company of the First Virginia Cavalry was bearing the entire burden. Stuart joined himself to this little band and attacked the flank of the Union cavalry. The First Virginia drove the Federals back. Many of the latter, having lost their horses in the fight, were keeping up on foot. One of these dismounted men turned, as he ran, and firing at the general with his pistol, inflicted the wound from which he shortly afterward died. Now, to turn back, when General Johnston, on the 18th of July, 1861, moved from the Shenandoah valley to Manassas, he left a body of cavalry, under Colonel McDonald, scattered throughout the country between the Shenandoah River and the North Mountains. In this body was a company from Fauquier County, commanded by Turner Ashby. Later on, this company was organized into a huge regiment of which McDonald was colonel; Turner Ashby, lieutenant-colonel, and Oliver Funsten, major. The duty assigned to this regiment Covering Lee's retreat from Pennsylvan
stroy both the wounded soldiers and those who sought to relieve their agonies. The upper photograph shows Mrs. Spinner's house, between Centreville and the Stone Bridge, which was used as a hospital during the battle of Bull Run, July 21, 1861. Here the Honorable A. Ely, Member of Congress, and a large number of Federal troops were made prisoners by the Confederate cavalry. The Stone Church at Centreville, shown in the lower picture, had been used as a hospital only three days before, July 18, 1861, after the battle of Blackburn's Ford. The houses upon the field of battle, especially the first year, before the field-hospital system was perfected, were often utilized for army hospital purposes. Mrs. Spinners house in 1862—used as a hospital in 1861 during the Bull Run battle The stone church at Centreville—a hospital before Bull Run I found an old carriage-and wagon-shop about sixty by one hundred feet, two stories high. It had a good roof, plenty of windows above and bel
stroy both the wounded soldiers and those who sought to relieve their agonies. The upper photograph shows Mrs. Spinner's house, between Centreville and the Stone Bridge, which was used as a hospital during the battle of Bull Run, July 21, 1861. Here the Honorable A. Ely, Member of Congress, and a large number of Federal troops were made prisoners by the Confederate cavalry. The Stone Church at Centreville, shown in the lower picture, had been used as a hospital only three days before, July 18, 1861, after the battle of Blackburn's Ford. The houses upon the field of battle, especially the first year, before the field-hospital system was perfected, were often utilized for army hospital purposes. Mrs. Spinners house in 1862—used as a hospital in 1861 during the Bull Run battle The stone church at Centreville—a hospital before Bull Run I found an old carriage-and wagon-shop about sixty by one hundred feet, two stories high. It had a good roof, plenty of windows above and bel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
did figure in the Confederacy, and who saw her upon several occasions. The book is one which will be eagerly read by those who are fond of the marvellous, and is undoubtedly one which possesses much interest for the general reader. How far it can be received as history, is altogether another question. E. g., we may read with interest this narrative of personal adventure without being forced to explain how this dashing Lieutenant could have fought with Beauregard at Blackburn's ford on the 18th of July, 1861, and yet have been with Johnston, who marched from Winchester to Beauregard's relief on the same day — how he happened to be at so many battles fought by the different armies in different sections of the country — or how he managed to accomplish various other physical impossibilities. Nor could we endorse many of the opinions of men and things so confidently expressed. We can only say that it is a very readable book, and would serve well to while away a winter's eveni
as seen that the real attack was to be against the position at Manassas, the order was sent to General Johnston to move to that point. His letters of the 12th and 15th instant expressed his doubts about his power to retire from before the superior force of General Patterson, therefore the word practicable was in this connection the equivalent of possible. That it was, at the time, so understood by General Johnston, is shown by his reply to the telegram. headquarters, Winchester, July 18, 1861. General:I have had the honor to receive your telegram of yesterday. General Patterson, who had been at Bunker Hill since Monday, seems to have moved yesterday to Charlestown, twenty-three miles to the east of Winchester. Unless he prevents it, we shall move toward General Beauregard to-day. . . . (Signed) Joseph E. Johnston. General S. Cooper. After General Johnston commenced his march to Manassas, he sent to me a telegram, the substance of which, as my memory serves and t
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
termination of Meade's truce. Babcock accordingly wrote requesting Meade to maintain the truce until orders from Grant could be received. To save time this was taken at once through our lines by Col. Forsyth of Sheridan's staff, who was accompanied by Col. Taylor, Lee's adjutant. The meeting, by strange coincidence, took place in the house of Maj. Wilmer McLean, who had owned the farm on Bull Run on which had occurred the first collision between the two armies at Blackburn's Ford on July 18, 1861, and who also owned the farm and house used for similar purposes to-day, as told in the account of that battle. Lee was accompanied to the meeting only by Col. Marshall, his military secretary, and a single courier, who held their horses during the two or three hours consumed. A quiet dignity characterized Lee's bearing throughout the scene, and on the part of all Federal officers present there an evident desire to show only the friendliest feelings. The formal proceedings were limite
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
enators......April 4, 1861 Steamboat New Sam Gaty arrives at Leavenworth from St. Louis, under Confederate flag. The captain is compelled by the people to substitute the stars and stripes......April 18, 1861 First Confederate flag captured by Kansas troops at Iatan, Mo., brought into Leavenworth......June 3, 1861 Organization of the 1st Kansas at Fort Leavenworth......June 4, 1861 First daily overland mail coach arrives at St. Joseph, Mo., seventeen days from Sacramento......July 18, 1861 Battle of Wilson's Creek, which saved Missouri to the Union; Gen. Nathaniel Lyon, of Kansas, killed......Aug. 10, 1861 Battle with Confederates at Dry Wood......Sept. 2, 1861 Platte River Bridge massacre, Barclay Coppoe and other Iowa soldiers killed......Sept. 3, 1861 Vote for State capital stood: Topeka, 7,996; Lawrence, 5,291; scattering, 1,184......Nov. 5, 1861 Confederate guerilla chief Quantrill makes a raid into Johnson county, burning Shawneetown......Oct. 17, 18
Matter seriously debated. Will await this morning for conclusion. James Chestnut, Jr. Telegram. Manassas, July 17th, 1861. To Genl. J. E. Johnston, Winchester, Va.: War Department has ordered you to join me; do so immediately, if possible, and we will crush the enemy. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Winchester, Va., July 17th, 1861. Genl. Beauregard, Manassas: Is the enemy upon you in force? Joseph E. Johnston. Telegram. Richmond, July 18th, 1861. Genl. G. T. Beauregard, Manassas, Va.: McRae's regiment, N. C., goes to you this evening. Barksdale's Mississippi regiment goes to you from Lynchburg. Further reinforcements have promise of transportation in the morning. Hampton's Legion and others will go as soon as possible. God be praised for your successful beginning. I have tried to join you, but remain to serve you here as most useful to the times. Jefferson Davis. Telegram. Richmond, July 19th, 1861. Ge
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Missouri, 1861 (search)
ve Corps. Union loss, 1 killed, 15 wounded. Total, 16. July 17: Skirmish, MartinsburgMISSOURI--1st Reserve Corps (1 Co.). Union loss, 1 killed, 1 wounded. Total, 2. July 17-19: Skirmishes, ParkersvilleMISSOURI--Cass County Home Guard Cavalry. July 18: Skirmish, MartinsburgMISSOURI--Reserve Corps, Cavalry (Co. "A"). July 18: Aciton near HarrisonvilleMISSOURI--Van Horn's Battalion Reserve Corps. Union loss, 1 killed. July 20-25: Expedition from Springfield to ForsythIOWA--1st Infantry (3 monJuly 18: Aciton near HarrisonvilleMISSOURI--Van Horn's Battalion Reserve Corps. Union loss, 1 killed. July 20-25: Expedition from Springfield to ForsythIOWA--1st Infantry (3 months). KANSAS--2d Infantry. UNITED STATES--Stanley's Dragoons; Totten's Battery "F" 2d Arty. July 22: Skirmish, EtnaMISSOURI--21st Infantry. July 22: Action, ForsythIOWA--1st Infantry. KANSAS--2d Infantry. UNITED STATES--Stanley's Dragoons Totten's Battery "F" 2d Arty. Union loss, 3 wounded. July 24: Action, Blue MillsMISSOURI--5th Reserve Corps. Union loss, 1 killed, 12 wounded. Total, 13. July 25: Skirmish, Dug SpringsMISSOURI--Battery "E" 1st Light Arty. UNITED STATES--Stanley's Dragoons,
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