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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., Index of Battles, etc., Mentioned in Preliminary Narrative. (search)
49. Baton Rouge, La. (May 12, 1862), 56; (Aug. 5, 1862), 57. Baylor's Farm, Va. (June 15, 1864), 125. Bayou Boeuf, La. (May 4, 1863), 61. Bayou De Glaize, La., see Yellow Bayou. Bayou La Fourche, La., see Cox's Plantation. Berryville, Va. (Aug 18, 1863), 103; (Sept. 3, 1864), 114. Bethesda Church, Va. (June 1-3, 1864), 122. Beverly Ford, see Brandy Station, Va. Big Bethel, Va. (June 10, 1861), 32. Bisland, La. (April 13, 1863), 60. Blackburn's Ford, Va. (July 18, 1861), 33. Black Creek, N. C. (March 16, 1865), 129. Blue Springs, Tenn. (Oct. 10, 1863), 107. Boydtown Plank Road, Va. (Oct. 8, 1864), 127; (March 29-31, 1865), 129. Boykin's Mills, S. C. (April 18, 1865), 90. Brandy Station, Va., or Beverly Ford, Va. (June 9, 1863), 97. Brashear City, La. (May 28, 1863), 62. Bristoe Station, Va. (Oct. 14, 1863), 103. Bull Run, Va. (July 21, 1861), 33. Camden, N. C. (April 19, 1862), 47. Campbell's Station, Tenn. (Nov. 16, 1863)
e. Abbot, Henry Larcom. Born at Beverly, Mass., Aug. 13, 1831. Cadet, U. S. Military Academy, July 1, 1850, to July 1, 1854. Brevet Second Lieutenant, Topographical Engineers, July 1, 1854. Second Lieutenant, Oct. 2, 1855. First Lieutenant, July 1, 1857. Assistant Topographical Engineer on the staff of Brig. General McDowell, July 5-15, 1861. Chief Topographical Engineer of General Tyler's division in the Manassas campaign of July, 1861. Engaged in the action of Blackburn's Ford, July 18, 1861, and battle of Bull Run, July 21, 1861, where he was wounded. Brevet Captain, July 21, 1861. Assistant Topographical Engineer in the defences of Washington, on the staff of General McDowell, July 23 to Aug. 21, 1861. Assistant to General Barnard in the construction of field-works south of the Potomac, Aug. 21, 1861, to Mar. 19, 1862. Brevet Major, May 4, 1862. Captain, Topographical Engineers, June 18, 1862. Colonel, 1st Conn. Artillery, Jan. 19, 1863. Transferred to Corps of Engine
enry. Private, Corporal and Quartermaster Sergeant, 20th Mass. Infantry, July 18, 1861. First Lieutenant, Regimental Quartermaster, 20th Mass. Infantry, July 1, 1muel A. First Lieutenant, 29th Mass. Infantry, Apr. 19, 1861. Resigned, July 18, 1861. Bent, Thomas D. First Sergeant, 2d Mass. Heavy Artillery, Aug. 22, 1First Sergeant, 20th Mass. Infantry, and in 21st Veteran Reserve Corps from July 18, 1861, to Mar. 28, 1864. First Lieutenant, 20th Mass. Infantry, Mar. 29, 1864. C, Apr. 15, 1865. Mann, Samuel Willard. Sergeant, 20th Mass. Infantry, July 18, 1861. Second Lieutenant, Oct. 1, 1862. Captain, 54th Mass. Infantry, May 13, 18t Mass. Infantry, May 25, 1861. Killed in action at Blackburn's Ford, Va., July 18, 1861. Smith, William H. H. Second Lieutenant, 4th Mass. Cavalry, Feb. 1, 1 Tyler, Jonas K. Captain, 29th Mass. Infantry, Apr. 19, 1861. Resigned, July 18, 1861. Tyler, Philip H. Sergeant, 3d Battery Mass. Light Artillery, Sept. 5
Infantry, June 16, 1865. Mustered out, Jan. 20, 1866. Second Lieutenant, 14th U. S. Infantry, May 11, 1866. Transferred to 32d U. S. Infantry, Sept. 21, 1866. First Lieutenant, Jan. 14, 1867. Transferred to 21st U. S. Infantry, Apr. 19, 1869. Died, Sept. 19, 1869. Macy, George Nelson. See General Officers. Magnitzki, Gustave. Born in Prussia. Appointed from Massachusetts. Private, Sergeant and First Sergeant, 20th Mass. Infantry, and in 21st Veteran Reserve Corps, from July 18, 1861, to Mar. 28, 1864. First Lieutenant, 20th Mass. Infantry, Mar. 29, 1864. Captain, June 30, 1864. Mustered out, July 16, 1865. Second Lieutenant, 39th U. S. Infantry, Mar. 7, 1867; accepted, Apr. 12, 1867. Brevet First Lieutenant and Captain, U. S. Army, Mar. 7, 1867. Unassigned, Apr. 30, 1869. Assigned to 14th U. S. Infantry, Aug. 3, 1870. Retired, Nov. 14, 1871, wounds in line of duty (Act Aug. 3, 1861). Mahony, Andrew. Born in Ireland. Entered the volunteer service, July, 1
aplain, 1st Ill. Light Artillery, Feb. 1, 1862. Mustered out, July 31, 1865. Post Chaplain, U. S. Army, July 2, 1876. See U. S. Army. Potter, Henry Langdon. Born at Monterey, Mass., Mar. 26, 1828. Lieut. Colonel, 71st N. Y. Infantry, July 18, 1861. Colonel, May 1, 1863. Discharged, Dec. 31, 1864. Potter, Robert B. See General Officers. Pratt, Caleb S. Born in Massachusetts. Second Lieutenant, 1st Kan. Infantry, June 3, 1861. Killed at the battle of Wilson's Creek, Mo., Auaves), May 13, 1861. Major, Surgeon, 10th N. Y. Infantry (National Zouaves), May 13, 1862. Resigned, March 10, 1863. Died at New York City, Dec. 3, 1882. White, Richard E. Born in Massachusetts. Second Lieutenant, 6th Iowa Infantry, July 18, 1861. Captain, Oct. 19, 1861. Killed in action at the battle of Shiloh, Tenn., Apr. 6, 1862. White, Whitman Vassel. Major, Surgeon, 27th N. Y. Infantry, Sept. 14, 1861. Resigned, Dec. 31, 1861. Major, Surgeon, 57th Mass. Infantry, Dec. 5
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: Marylanders in the campaigns of 1861. (search)
corps, within supporting distance of each other along the exposed frontier of Virginia. If one army was attacked the corps to the right and left of it was to move promptly to its assistance. Patterson, after retiring beyond the Potomac, was heavily reinforced and recrossed the river, threatening Johnston at Winchester. Johnston, on the other hand, covered his front so thoroughly with cavalry patrols and pickets as to interpose an impenetrable veil between Patterson and himself. On July 18, 1861, General McDowell moved out of Alexandria on Beauregard at Fairfax Court House. Beauregard retired behind Bull Run. McDowell on the 19th made a heavy reconnoissance in force and found Beauregard's position. The latter called on Johnston for help. He left Winchester in the morning of the 18th and marched to Piedmont, on the Manassas Gap railroad, whence his troops were hurried by rail to Manassas Junction. In the meantime McDowell had thrown his right around Beauregard's left, turned
Petersburg, and was included in the surrender at Appomattox. After the close of hostilities General Johnston practiced law at Charlotte for twenty years from 1867 as a partner of Col. H. C. Jones. Brigadier-General W. W. Kirkland Brigadier-General W. W. Kirkland, as colonel of the Eleventh North Carolina volunteers, known later as the Twenty-first regiment, reached the field in Virginia in time to participate in the affair at Mitchell's ford on Bull run, with Bonham's brigade, on July 18, 1861. On the memorable 21st of July he was field officer of the day for the brigade, and at 2:30 a. m brought to General Bonham information of the approach of the enemy toward the stone bridge. His regiment manfully sustained a heavy fire through the day, and at 3 p. m. assisted in the pursuit of the enemy. Subsequently he was assigned to the brigade of Col. Jubal A. Early, and later to that of General Trimble, and with General Ewell's division participated in the Shenandoah valley campai
ich in storm or sunshine never left her war-scarred features, had ceased to be a Capua. The Louisiana regiments, once so petted, had not been spoiled for active service. Hearing the drum beat, they struck tents with shouts of joy and took up a quickstep. Beauregard was posted somewhere ahead—that was what the Washington artillery on their caissons had gaily said—somewhere on the road to Washington. Louisiana showed a considerable forge in this campaign, beginning with the battle of July 18, 1861, and culminating in the picturesque victory of First Manassas on the 21st. At that time there were present in Beauregard's army the Sixth Louisiana volunteers, Col. I. G. Seymour; First Special battalion, Maj. C. R. Wheat; Seventh regiment, Col. Harry T. Hays; Eighth regiment, Col. H. B. Kelly; and the Washington artillery, Maj. John B. Walton. On the 18th the Louisianians, Ewell's brigade, occupying position in vicinity of the Union Mills ford, included Seymour's regiment. Wheat's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
f uniform length or shape, and varied in weight from a thousand to twelve hundred pounds. Several of these guns were used at the first battle of Manassas, and three of them were engaged in the first artillery duel at Blackburn's Ford on the 18th of July, 1861. The projectiles furnished for them at that time were of two kinds, known as the Burton and the Archer, both of which were expected to receive the rotary motion from a leaden ring or sabot which the discharge forced into the grooves. Theythe tiger-head of our command, with the inscription, Try us, little did we think how soon it would receive its baptism of fire, and how many well-fought fields would in after years attest our fidelity and our devotion to our motto. On the 18th July, 1861, the guns of the four batteries were placed in position upon the banks of Bull Run, and we waited with the breathless interest, and varying feelings of men for the first time under fire, for the opening of the ball, tasting of That stern
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery service. (search)
day, under the direction of the Ordnance Departments of Confederate or State governments, and soon turned out a number, generally of three inches calibre, and with five or seven grooves. They were all adapted to the same ammunition, but were not of uniform length or shape, and varied in weight from a thousand to twelve hundred pounds. Several of these guns were used at the first battle of Manassas, and three of them were engaged in the first artillery duel at Blackburn's Ford on the 18th of July, 1861. The projectiles furnished for them at that time were of two kinds, known as the Burton and the Archer, both of which were expected to receive the rotary motion from a leaden ring or sabot which the discharge forced into the grooves. They differed about two pounds in weight, and the charges for them differed three ounces; but as the latter could not be easily distinguished from each other, they were used indiscriminately. In the excitement of the battle these projectiles were suppos
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