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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 3, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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r, Va. 4 Gettysburg, Pa. 1 Petersburg, Va. 1 Present, also, at Yorktown; Williamsburg; Seven Days Battle; Antietam; Fredericksburg (1862); Salem Heights; Mine Run. notes.--Recruited in Western Massachusetts. Arrived at Washington July 28, 1861, and remained in its vicinity until the army moved to the Peninsula, in March, 1862, It was assigned to Devens's (3d) Brigade, Couch's (1st) Division, Fourth Corps. Under command of Colonel Briggs it distinguished itself at Fair Oaks, the Co, Va., May 13th 6 Detail, Artillery Service 4 Present, also, at Cedar Mountain; Rappahannock; Groveton; Fredericksburg; Chancellorsville; Haymarket; Mine Run; Totopotomoy; Boydton Road; Appomattox. notes.--The regiment left Wisconsin July 28, 1861, proceeding to Washington, where it was assigned to the brigade which was destined to fill such a glorious place in the annals of the war. The Sixth had the advantage of a year's drill and discipline before it was called upon to face the enem
ruck by the enemy's balls. A number of Georgians fell here, and their graves are close by. In the grove was pointed out the spot where Lamar fell. In the rear was the dead charger of the lamented Gen. Bartow, killed under him, himself to fall soon after. But the Georgians suffered not their heroes to fall unavenged, for they piled the ground before them with the slain of the enemy. Bulletin of Johnston and Beauregard. Headquarters of the army of the Potomac, Manassas Junction, July 28, 1861. Soldiers of the Confederate States:-- One week ago a countless host of men, organized into an army, with all the appointments which modern art and practiced skill could devise, invaded the soil of Virginia. Their people sounded their approach with triumph and displays of anticipated victory. Their generals came in almost regal state. Their Minister, Senators, and women came to witness the immolation of this army and the subjugation of our people, and to celebrate these with wild
lery. 6. That the amount of ammunition to accompany field-batteries was not to be less than 400 rounds per gun. 7. A siege-train of 50 pieces. This was subsequently expanded, for special service at the siege of Yorktown, to very nearly 100 pieces, and comprised the unusual calibres and enormously heavy weight of metal of two 200-pounders, five 100-pounders, and ten 13-inch sea-coast mortars. As has been before stated, the whole of the field-artillery of the Army of the Potomac, July 28, 1861, was comprised of 9 imperfectly equipped batteries of 30 guns, 650 men, and 400 horses. In March, 1862, when the whole army took the field, it consisted of 92 batteries of 520 guns, 12,500 men, and 11,000 horses, fully equipped and in readiness for active field service; of the whole force 30 batteries were regulars and 62 batteries volunteers. During the short period of seven months all of this immense amount of material was manufactured or purchased, and issued by the ordnance departm
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
e David was still afloat, swam back to her, where he found Pilot J. W. Cannon, who could not swim, clinging to her side. Tombs clambered aboard and pulled Cannon after him, and together they managed to build a fire under the boiler and bring the little vessel safely back to Charleston. Chesapeake Bay, described in another chapter, and which were between small naval forces and land batteries, no regular vessel of the United States navy had discharged a gun at a floating foe until on July 28, 1861, the Confederate privateer Petrel, formerly the United States revenue cutter Aiken, was sunk by the sailing frigate St. Lawrence after receiving two shots broadside. Out of her crew of forty, thirty-six were rescued by the St. Lawrence's boats. To the Federal navy belongs the honor of achieving the first signal success along the coast, in the bombardment and capture of Forts Hatteras and Clark at Hatteras Inlet, on the 28th and 29th of August, 1861. From Hatteras Inlet offensive ope
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
ttack upon the fleet after her encounter with the Monitor. The Vanderbilt mounted fifteen guns and showed great speed. She was employed largely as a cruiser. Her first prize was the British blockade-runner Peterhoff, captured off St. Thomas, February 25, 1863. On April 16th she caught the Gertrude in the Bahamas, and on October 30th the Saxon, off the coast of Africa. Under command of Captain C. W. Pickering, she participated in both of the joint-expeditions against Fort Fisher. July 28, 1861. Confederate privateer Petrel, formerly U. S. revenue cutter Aiken, sunk by U. S. frigate St. Lawrence near Charleston. August, 1861. August 22, 1861. The steamer Samuel Orr was seized at Paducah, Ky., by Confederates, and taken up the Tennessee River. August 26, 1861. Naval and military expedition to North Carolina coast sailed from Hampton Roads, Va., under command of Flag-Officer Stringham and Maj.-Gen. Butler. August 28-29, 1861. Bombardment and captur
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Petrel, the (search)
Petrel, the The United States revenue-cutter Aiken, which had been surrendered to the insurgents at Charleston, in December, 1860, was converted into a privateer, manned by a crew of thirty-six men, mostly Irish, and called the Petrel. On July 28, 1861, she went to sea, and soon fell in with the National frigate St. Lawrence, which she mistook for a merchantman. She was regarded as a rich prize, and the Petrel bore down upon her, while she appeared to be trying to escape. When the latter came within fair range, the St. Lawrence opened her ports and gave her the contents of three heavy guns. One of these sent a shell known as the Thunderbolt, which exploded in the hold of the Petrel, while a 32-pound shot struck her amidships, below the watermark. In an instant she was made a total wreck, and went to the bottom of the ocean, leaving the foaming waters over her grave thickly strewn with splinters and her struggling crew. Four of these were drowned; the remainder were saved.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Missouri, 1861 (search)
RI--5th Reserve Corps. Union loss, 1 killed, 12 wounded. Total, 13. July 25: Skirmish, Dug SpringsMISSOURI--Battery "E" 1st Light Arty. UNITED STATES--Stanley's Dragoons, 2 Companies Regular Infantry. July 25: Skirmish, HarrisonvilleKANSAS--5th Cavalry. July 26: Skirmish, Lane's Prairie, near RollaMISSOURI--Home Guard. Union loss, 3 wounded. July 26: Skirmish, McCulla's StoreMISSOURI--Battery "E" 1st Light Arty. July 27: Skirmish, HarrisonvilleMISSOURI--Cass County Home Guard Cavalry. July 28: Occupation of New MadridBy Confederates. Aug. 1: Skirmish, Edina(No Reports.) Aug. 2: Reconnoissance from Ironton to CentrevilleILLINOIS--24th Infantry. Aug. 2: Skirmish, Dug SpringsIOWA--1st Infantry. MISSOURI--Batteries "A," "B," "C," "H," "K" 1st Light Arty.; 3d Infantry (3 months). UNITED STATES--4th Cavalry; 2d Infantry (4 Co's). Union loss, 4 killed, 37 wounded. Total, 41. Aug. 3: Action, McCulla's StoreMISSOURI--1st Light Arty (Co's "A," "H"). Aug. 5: Skirmish, AthensIOWA--Keok
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, I. List of officers from Massachusetts in United States Navy, 1861 to 1865. (search)
.Sept. 19, 1862.Actg. 3d Asst. Engr.Itasca; Ossipee.West Gulf.Mar. 12, 1866.Resigned.Actg. 2d Asst. Engr. Oct. 23/63.Actg. 2d Asst. Engr. Gheradi, Bancroft, In service prior to 1861. See Navy Register.Mass.Mass.Mass.—--,‘61.Lieutenant.Mohican.Special Service. July 16, 1862.Lieut.-Comdr.Chocura; Octorora.West Gulf. Gibbs, Albion P.,Mass.Mass.Mass.Feb. 22, 1864.Actg Ensign.-West Gulf.Oct. 28, 1865.Hon. discharged.Actg. Ensign. Gibbs, Charles I., Credit, Boston.Mass.Mass.Mass.July 28, 1861.Actg. Master's Mate.Richmond; Kickapoo; Morgan; Metacomet; Bienville.West Gulf.Jan. 5, 1866.Hon. discharged.Actg. Vol. Lieut. Feb. 8, 1862.Actg. Master. Feb. 4, 1864.Actg. Vol. Lieut. Gibbs, Paul C.,Mass.Mass.Mass.Apr. 15, 1862.Actg. Master.R. R. Cuyler.Gulf.Oct. 5, 1863.Resigned.Actg. Master. Gibbs, William C.,Mass.Mass.Mass.Feb. 26, 1862.Actg. Master.Brooklyn.Gulf.Feb. 21, 1863.Resigned.Actg. Master. Gibbs, William P., Credit, Boston.Mass.Mass.Mass.Dec. 26, 1861.Actg. Master.
d, Nov. 22, 1863. Resigned, Aug. 3, 1864. Gale (or Gales), Charles L. Born in Massachusetts. Wagoner, 6th Minn. Infantry, Aug. 21, 1862. Second Lieutenant, Jan. 5, 1863; mustered, Feb. 28, 1863. Mustered out, Aug. 19, 1865. Gambell, Orren W. Born in Massachusetts. Junior First Lieutenant, 1st Battery Iowa Light Artillery, Aug. 17, 1861. Senior First Lieutenant, Oct. 3, 1862. Resigned, June 4, 1863. Gardner, Gideon. Born in Massachusetts. Captain, 7th Iowa Infantry, July 28, 1861; mustered, July 24, 1861. Resigned, Aug. 31, 1862. Garrett, Jesse B. Born in Massachusetts. First Lieutenant, 17th Iowa Infantry, Mar. 21, 1862. Resigned, Jan. 20, 1863. Gerry, Edson. Born at Whately, Mass., May 27, 1815. Captain, 12th Penn. Cavalry, Nov. 20, 1861. Discharged, Nov. 20, 1864. Re-enlisted in 12th Penn. Cavalry, Nov. 21, 1864. Major, Jan. 13, 1865. Discharged, Aug. 20, 1865. Gillespie, William. Sergeant, 44th Infantry, M. V. M., in service of the U.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Georgia Infantry. (search)
gadier-general having been filled for him upon the recommendation of General Lee and others, his commanders. His conspicuous gallantry in the battles of Alleghany, McDowell, Port Republic, Gaines' Mill, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Sharpsburg, Boteler's Mill, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg is noted in the personal reports of his several commanders.] [I] from the Georgia Twelfth regiment. (correspondence of the Savannah Republican.) Camp Alleghany, Pocahontas county, Va., 28 July, 1861. Mr. Editor: Knowing that the people of Georgia feel a deep interest in the condition and movements of the soldiers that represent that State in the service of the Southern Confederacy, and that among your readers are many of the friends and kindred—the parents and children, brothers, sisters and wives—of those attached to the same command with myself, I respectfully ask the privilege of publishing in your columns such items of intelligence, facts, incidents and speculations connected
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