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wise, as the enemy outnumbered us greatly. Mr.----and myself have just returned from a delightful walk to Pagebrook. We were talking of our future, about which he will not allow me to despond. The Lord will provide, he says, and begins at once to count up our mercies, We constantly hear that our children and near relatives are well-none of them have been wounded, all mercifully spared; so that we would be ungrateful indeed to encourage or allow a feeling of despondency. Wednesday, October 30, 1861. Captain and Mrs. W. N. dined with us to-day. It was gratifying to see him look so well, after the intense suffering through which he has passed. He was borne from the field of Manassas, with what seemed to be a mortal wound; a ball had passed through his body. But, thanks to a merciful Providence, good nursing and surgery have saved his valuable life. We are now planning to go to the lower country, but when and where we do not know. November 3d, 1861. To-day we were
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 13: responsibility for the failure to pursue. (search)
cticable, had reference to General Johnston's letters of July 12th and 15th, representing the relative strength and positions of the enemy under Patterson, and of his own forces, to be such as to make it doubtful whether General Johnston had the power to effect the movement. Upon the receipt of General Beauregard's report of the battle of Manassas, I found that it contained matter which seemed to me out of place, and therefore addressed to him the following letter: Richmond, Va., October 30, 1861. General Beauregard, Manassas, Va. Sir: Yesterday my attention was called to various newspaper publications, purporting to have been sent from Manassas, and to be a synopsis of your report of the battle of July 21st, last, and in which it is represented that you have been overruled by me in your plan for a battle with the enemy, south of the Potomac, for the capture of Baltimore and Washington, and the liberation of Maryland. I inquired for your long-expected report, and it has
enemy's front rank, but escaped uninjured. In conclusion, I beg to urge the necessity of new clothing and arms for my command. Fortyfive horses are killed or unfitted for use. Uniforms, haversacks, and extra clothes carried in the haversacks, are so riddled with bullets as to be useless. Revolvers are also seriously damaged by the enemy's bullets. Very respectfully, Chas. Zagonyi, Commanding Body Guard. Springfield, October 28, 1861. Major White's report. Springfield, October 30, 1861. Major-General Fremont: On the 24th inst., after my return with my command, one hundred and fifty-four strong, from Lexington, I reported to you, and by your orders reported for further orders to General Sigel, at his headquarters. General Sigel ordered me to reconnoitre in the vicinity of Springfield, and, if I deemed it advisable, to attack the rebel force said to be encamped in that neighborhood. I immediately pushed my command forward, and on the evening of the 24th was overtak
Doc. 111. fight on the Tennessee River. Captain Foote's report. St. Louis, October 30, 1861. sir: The Conestoga, Lieut. Corn. Phelps, has again been up the Tennessee River as far as Eddyville, sixty-two miles distant from Paducah, with three companies of the Illinois regiment, under command of Major Phillips, and conjointly they have had a handsome and successful skirmish, in which the rebels broke and fled in every direction, leaving seven dead on the field. Our casualties consist of two severely wounded and a few slightly so — among them a captain of a company. Forty-four prisoners were taken from the enemy; also seven negroes and thirty-one horses, eleven mules, two transportation wagons, a large number of saddles, muskets, rifles, shot-guns, sabres, knives, &c. Lieut. Corn. Phelps, and the officers and crew of the Conestoga, as well as Major Phillips and his men, are deserving of the highest credit for their bearing in this expedition. I have the honor to be,
on it was Resolved, That the proceedings of the Conference should be private and confidential until ordered to be made public by a majority thereof, and that all participating in its proceedings, or present at its deliberations, should be held pledged to secrecy in reference thereto. J. C. Wickliffe, of Nelson County, moved that the Conference adjourn to meet again to-morrow morning, at ten o'clock. Ayes twenty-three, nays twenty-two, and the Conference accordingly adjourned. Wednesday, Oct. 30, 1861. The Conference met pursuant to adjournment. The journal of yesterday was read and approved. The following gentlemen appeared and took seats in the Conference, viz.: From Carroll County, H. L. Giltner; from Anderson County, J. H. D. McKee; from Muhlenburg County, W. U. Wand; from Woodford County, Sandford Lyne; from Monroe County, Z. McDaniel; from Christian County, Henry Young; from Campbell County, George B. Hodge; from Jefferson County, J. B. Bell. Colonel G. W. Jo
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
ey, Mark. P., Oct. 4, 1863. Lowry, Robert, Feb. 4, 1865. Lyon, Hylan B., June 14, 1864. McCausland, J., May 18, 1864. McComb, Wm., June 30, 1865. McCulloch, Hi. E., Mar. 14, 1862. McCullough, Ben., May 11, 1861. McGowan, S., Jan. 17, 1863. McIntosh, James, Jan. 21, 1862. McNair, Evander, Nov. 4, 1862. McRae, Dandridge, Nov. 5, 1862. Mackall, Wm. W., Feb. 27, 1862. Major, James P., July 21, 1863. Maney, George, April 16, 1862. Manigault, A. M., April 26, 1863. Marshall, H., Oct. 30, 1861. Martin, James G., May 15, 1862. Maxey, S. B., Mar. 4, 1862. Mercer, Hugh W., Oct. 29, 1861. Moody, Young M., Mar. 4, 1865. Moore, John C., May 26, 1862. Moore, P. T., Sept. 20, 1864. Morgan, John H., Dec. 11, 1862. Morgan, John T., June 6, 1863. Mouton, Alfred, April 16, 1862. Nelson, Allison, Sept. 12, 1862. Nicholls, F. T., Oct. 14, 1862. O'Neal, Ed. A., June 6, 1863. Parsons, M. M., Nov. 5, 1862. Paxton, E. F., Nov. 1, 1861. Peck, Wm. R., Feb. 18, 1865. Pegram, John,
reference to General Johnston's letters of the 12th and 15th of July, representing the relative strength and positions of the enemy under Patterson and of his own forces to be such as to make it doubtful whether General Johnston had the power to effect the movement. Upon the receipt of General Beauregard's report of the battle of Manassas, I found that it contained matter which seemed to me out of place, and therefore addressed to him the following letter: Richmond, Virginia, October 30, 1861. General Beauregard, Manassas, Virginia. sir: Yesterday my attention was called to various newspaper publications purporting to have been sent from Manassas, and to be a synopsis of your report of the battle of the 21st of July last, and in which it is represented that you have been overruled by me in your plan for a battle with the enemy south of the Potomac for the capture of Baltimore and Washington, and the liberation of Maryland. I inquired for your long-expected report, and
gard, by his silence, confirmed Mr. Davis in his avowed suppositions concerning him? The following letter testifies to the feelings which appear to have been suddenly aroused in Mr. Davis's mind. It explains the hostile attitude of his administration towards General Beauregard, and fully justifies the latter in his endeavor to set himself right before the country. The importance and the significant bearing of this letter render necessary its publication entire. Richmond, Va., Oct. 30th, 1861. General G. T. Beauregard: Sir,—Yesterday my attention was called to various newspaper publications purporting to have been sent from Manassas, and to a synopsis of your report of the battle of the 21st of July past, and in which it is represented that you had been overruled by me in your plan for a battle with the enemy south of the Potomac, for the capture of Baltimore and Washington, and the liberation of Maryland. I inquired for your long-expected report, and it has to-day be
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Brigadier-Generals of the Confederate States Army, alphabetically arranged. (search)
all the cavalry in North Arkansas; brigade composed of the 3d Confederate, the 25th, 29th and 37th Tennessee regiments and Sweet's Light Battery, constituting the 4th brigade, 3d corps, Army of the Mississippi. 286Marshall, HumphreyKentucky Oct. 30, 1861.Oct. 30, 1861.Dec. 13, 1861. Resigned June 17, 1863; at the affair at Princeton, Virginia, in May, 1862, command consisted of the 54th and 29th Virginia regiments, the 5th Kentucky regiment, Dunn's battalion, Bradley's Mounted Kentucky RiflesOct. 30, 1861.Dec. 13, 1861. Resigned June 17, 1863; at the affair at Princeton, Virginia, in May, 1862, command consisted of the 54th and 29th Virginia regiments, the 5th Kentucky regiment, Dunn's battalion, Bradley's Mounted Kentucky Rifles and Jeffree's Light Battery. 287Marshall, JohnTexas     Killed June 27, 1862, in charge at Gaines' Mill. 288Martin, John D.Mississippi   Sept. 30, 1862. Brigade consisted of the 17th, 42d, 50th and 66th North Corolina regiments. 289Martin, James G.N. CarolinaGen. T. H. HolmesMay 17, 1862.May 15, 1862.April 22, 1863. Promoted Major-General November 10, 1863; assigned to the command of the cavalry brigades of Roddy and Crosby. 290Martin, Wm. T.MississippiLt. Gen. PembertonDec. 2, 1862.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
and mortally wounded and 8 Officers and 328 Enlisted men by disease. Total 401. 7th Illinois Regiment Cavalry Organized at Camp Butler, Ills., and mustered in October 13, 1861. Companies A, C, G and I ordered to Bird's Point, Mo., October 30, 1861. Rest of regiment moved to Bird's Point December 24, thence to Cape Girardeau, Mo., and duty there till February, 1862. Attached to District of Cairo, Ills., to February, 1862. 4th Brigade, 1st Division, District Cairo, to March, 18 out May 29, 1866. Regiment lost during service 38 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 192 Enlisted men by disease. Total 234. 13th Illinois Regiment Cavalry Eight Companies organized at Camp Douglass, Ill., October 30, 1861, to February 20, 1862. Consolidated to a Battalion of 3 Companies May 20, 1863. Seven new Companies assigned February, 1864. Regiment moved to Benton Barracks, Mo., December, 1861, and duty there till February, 1862. Attached to
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