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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 13 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 9 9 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 28, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 2 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., With Slemmer in Pensacola Harbor. (search)
mmand of the Department of Florida, with headquarters at Fort Pickens, and continued in command until February 22d, 1862, when he was succeeded by General Lewis G. Arnold. The Confederates continued to hold the opposite shore until the 9th of May, 1862, when it was evacuated by them, the Union forces taking possession the next day. On the 11th of March, 1861, General Braxton Bragg assumed command of the Confederate forces. He was succeeded in command of the Army of Pensacola on the 27th of January, 1862, by General Samuel Jones, who, on the 8th of March, was succeeded in command of the post by Colonel Thomas M. Jones, under whom the evacuation took place, whereupon the position was occupied by the United States troops, and the headquarters of the West Gulf Squadron, which had been at Ship Island, were transferred to Pensacola. The harbor was considered the best on the Gulf. The chief events during the Confederate occupation were: September 2d, 1861. Destruction of the dry-d
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
ed movements and daring at Mill Spring, the nation will realize its hopes, and delight to honor its brave soldiers. The defeat was severely felt by the Confederates; for they were wise enough to understand its significance, prophesying, as it truly did, of further melancholy disasters to their cause. The conspirators perceived the urgent necessity for a bold, able, and dashing commander in the West, and believing Beauregard to be such an one, he was ordered to Johnston's Department, Jan. 27, 1862. and General G. W. Smith, who had been an active democratic politician in New York city, was appointed to succeed him at Manassas. On leaving the army at Manassas, Beauregard issued a characteristic address to them, telling them he hoped soon to be back among them. I am anxious, he said, that my brave countrymen here in arms, fronting the haughty array and muster of Northern mercenaries, should thoroughly appreciate the exigency. Alluding to their disquietude because of long inactio
e force of that mysterious influence called pressure, --a power behind the throne, greater than the throne, --which has done so much harm and so little good in the conduct of the war. The President's practical exercise of his constitutional functions as commander-in-chief began with the issuing of the following order, which, be it always borne in mind, was done without consultation with General McClellan:-- (President's General War order, no. 1.) Executive Mansion, Washington, January 27, 1862. Ordered, That the 22d day of February, 1862, be the day for a general movement of the land and naval forces of the United States against the insurgent forces. That especially the army at and about Fortress Monroe, the Army of the Potomac, the Army of Western Virginia, the army near Munfordsville, Kentucky, the army and flotilla at Cairo, and a naval force in the Gulf of Mexico, be ready to move on that day. That all other forces, both land and naval, with their respective comman
ns in rear of the whole, and in the order of their regiment. By order of General Crittenden. A. L. Cunningham, A. A. General. Colonel McCook's report. headquarters Third brigade, First division, Department of the Ohio, Somerset, January 27, 1862. Brigadier-General G. H. Thomas, commanding First Division: sir: I have the honor respectfully to submit the following report of the part which my brigade took in the battle of the Cumberland on the 19th instant. Shortly before seven A. ered are said to reveal the character of our fortifications at Mill Spring, the number of our troops, and the amount of provisions on hand, etc. --Tuscumbia Alabamian, Jan. 31. Letter from an officer in Crittenden's command. on March, Jan. 27, 1862. editors patriot: You have heard long since of the recent fight on Fishing Creek, between our forces and the Federals; consequently, I shall not at this time attempt to give you any of the details, but will do so at my earliest convenience
Doc. 86.-President Lincoln's orders: published March 11, 1862. Executive mansion, Washington, January 27, 1862. President's General War Order, No. 1. Ordered, That the Twenty-second day of February, 1862, be the day for a general movement of the land and naval forces of the United States against the insurgent forces. That especially The Army at and about Fortress Monroe, The Army of the Potomac, The Army of Western Virginia, The Army near Mumfordsvillc, Kentucky, The Army and Flotilla at Cairo, And a Naval Force in the Gulf of Mexico, be ready for a movement on that day. That all other forces, both land and naval, with their respective commanders, obey existing orders for the time, and be ready to obey additional orders when duly given. That the Heads of Departments, and especially the Secretaries of War and of the Navy, with all their subordinates, and the General-in-Chief, with all other commanders and subordinates of land and naval forces, w
ted the latter. My report gives all the most important correspondence on this subject, and the arguments I used in support of the plan of campaign which commended itself to my judgment. Let me here call attention to the President's orders of Jan. 27 and Jan. 31, 1862, and his letter to me of Feb. 3, answered in mine of the same day to the Secretary of War: President's general War order, no. 1. executive Mansion, Washington, Jan. 27, 1862. Ordered, That the 22d day of Feb., 1862, Jan. 27, 1862. Ordered, That the 22d day of Feb., 1862, be the day for a general movement of the land and naval forces of the United States against the insurgent forces. That especially the army at and about Fortress Monroe, the Army of the Potomac, the Army of Western Virginia the army near Munfordville, Kentucky, the army and flotilla at Cairo, and a naval force in the Gulf of Mexico be ready to move on that day. That all other forces, both land and naval, with their respective commanders, obey existing orders for the time, and be ready to obe
at or near Pensacola, Florida, under Major-General Braxton Bragg, were designated the Army of Pensacola on October 22, 1861. Brigadier-General A. H. Gladden had temporary command in December, and Brigadier-General Samuel Jones took charge on January 27, 1862. The force then numbered eighty-one hundred men, divided among regiments from Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, and Mississippi. On March 13th, the army was discontinued, the regiments entering the Army of the Mississippi or assigned fe head of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, in April, 1864. At the close of the war he was in charge of the Department of Florida and South Georgia. He died in Washington, D. C., April 1, 1887. Army of Mobile On January 27, 1862, the command of Brigadier-General Jones M. Withers, consisting of Alabama troops in and around the city of Mobile, was designated the Army of Mobile. Its strength was about ten thousand. It was subsequently commanded by Colonel J. B. Ville
30thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. James J. ScalesJune 6, 1863.  Col. G. F. Neill   31stMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. J. A. OrrApril 9, 1862.Member of Confederate Congress. 32dMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. M. P. LowryApril 3, 1862.Promoted Brigadier-General. 33dMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. HardcastleApril 19, 1862.  Col. E. W. Hurst   34thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. Samuel BentonApril 19, 1862.Promoted Brigadier-General. 35thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. W. S. BarryJan. 27, 1862.Promoted Brigadier-General. 36thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. W. W. WitherspoonMay 11, 1862.  Col. D. J. Brown   37thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. Orlando HollandOct. 4, 1862.  Col. Robert McLain   38thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. F. W. Adams   39thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. W. B. ShelbyMay 13, 1862.  40thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. W. B. ColbertMay 14, 1862.  41stMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. W. F. TuckerMay 8, 1862.Promoted Brigadier-General. 42dMiss
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
le August 16-21. Affairs at Hunnewell and Palmyra August 17. Operations in Northeast Missouri August 30-September 7. Expedition against Green's Guerrillas September 8-9. Moved to St. Joseph, Mo., September 10, and duty there till January 27, 1862. Skirmish at Platte City September 14, 1861. Attached to Dept. of Missouri to February, 1862. 4th Brigade, 1st Division, District of Cairo, February, 1862. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, Army of Mississippi, to April, 1862. 2nd Br Cumberland, to June, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to October, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 14th Army Corps, to July, 1865. Service. Moved from St. Joseph, Mo., to Bird's Point, Mo., January 27, 1862, thence to New Madrid, Mo., March 3. Operations against New Madrid and Island No.10 March 3-April 8. Actions at New Madrid March 12-14. Capture of New Madrid March 14. Island No.10 April 6. Action and capture at Tiptonville Ap
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
of Hood's attack on Resaca October 12. Rejoined Battery at Chattanooga November, 1864.) Non-Veterans mustered out January 25, 1865. Veterans and Recruits consolidated with 7th Indiana Battery March 13, 1865. Battery lost during service 5 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 10 Enlisted men by disease. Total 15. 9th Indiana Independent Battery Light Artillery Organized at Indianapolis, Ind., and mustered in December 20, 1861. Duty at Indianapolis, Ind., till January 27, 1862. Moved to Cairo, II., January 27, and duty there till March 27. Remustered February 25, 1862. Attached to Military District of Cairo to April, 1862. Artillery, 3rd Division, Army of the Tennessee, to July, 1862. Artillery, 1st Division, District of Jackson, Tenn., to September, 1862. Artillery, 4th Division, District of Jackson to November, 1862. Artillery, 4th Division, District of Jackson, Right Wing 13th Army Corps (Old), Dept. of the Tennessee, to December, 1862
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