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Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 8: winter campaign in the Valley. 1861-62. (search)
officers is too obvious to need illustration. Of the personal element of wrong, Jackson seemed to feel little, and he said nothing. But, considering his usefulness in his District at an end under such a mode of administration, he instantly determined to leave it. The reply which he sent to the War department is so good an example of military subordination, and, at the same time, of manly independence, that it should be repeated. Headquarters, Valley district, Hon. J. P. Benjamin, January 31st, 1862. Sec. of War. Sir,--Your order requiring me to direct General Loring to return with his command to Winchester, immediately, has been received, and promptly complied with. With such interference in my command, I cannot expect to be of much service in the field, and accordingly respectfully request to be ordered to report for duty to the Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute, at Lexington; as has been done in the case of other professors. Should this application not b
nd did not fire a gun, but wanted them to surrender at first. The Nationals had one man killed and four wounded. They had the advantage of darkness to cover them, and only could be seen when a gun flashed in firing, while they never put out their lights. Thus not a rebel escaped to tell the tale, unless they had some outside as pickets. The following acknowledgments of bravery in this action were made public soon after it occurred: Headquarters army of the Potomac, Washington, Jan. 31, 1862. Special Order, No. 31: The Commanding General thanks Lieutenant-Colonel John Burke, Thirty-seventh New York Volunteers, and the handful of brave men of that regiment, and the First New Jersey Cavalry, under his command, for their services in the affair at Lee's house, on Belmont or Occoquan Bay, on the night of the 28th inst. Their coolness under fire, and the discretion and judgment displayed by Lieutenant-Colonel Burke, have won the confidence of the Commanding General, who reco
ubordinates, and the general-in-chief, with all other commanders and subordinates of land and naval forces, will severally be held to their strict and full responsibilities for prompt execution of this order. Abraham Lincoln. The President, as has been said, disapproved of General McClellan's plan of attacking Richmond by the Lower Chesapeake, and substituted one of his own, by a new order, as follows:-- (President's special War order, no. 1.) Executive Mansion, Washington, January 31, 1862. Ordered, That all the disposable force of the Army of the Potomac, after providing safely for the defence of Washington, be formed into an expedition for the immediate object of seizing and occupying a point upon the railroad southwestward of what is known as Manassas Junction, all details to be in the discretion of the commander-in-chief, and the expedition to move before or on the 22d day of February next. Abraham Lincoln. These two orders should be considered together and ca
, Ga. 43 Goodrich, La. (Foraging) 1 Lovejoy's Station, Ga. 2 Guerrillas, Miss. 1 Siege of Atlanta, Ga. 3 Jackson, Tenn. 1     Present, also, at Siege of Corinth; Lumpkin's Mills, Miss; March to the Sea; The Carolinas; Brush Mountain, Ga.; Nickajack Creek, Ga.; Jonesboro, Ga.; Siege of Savannah; Pocotaligo, S. C.; Salkahatchie, S. C.; Orangeburg, S. C.; Columbia, S. C.; Bentonville, N. C. notes.--Organized at Madison, Wis., and mustered into the United States service on January 31, 1862. After a few weeks of drill and discipline it left the State March 13, proceeding to St. Louis, and thence to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., where General Grant's Army was then encamped. It was assigned to Peabody's (1st) Brigade, Prentiss's (6th) Division, Army of the Tennessee, and was engaged soon after its arrival in the great battle of Shiloh. On the morning of that battle, April 6th, the pickets of the Sixteenth Wisconsin received the first fire of the enemy; the regiment was hotly
d other stores to a large amount, fell into our hands. The General has been charged by the General-in-chief to convey his thanks to Gen. Thomas and his troops for their brilliant victory. No task could be more grateful to him, seconded as it is by his own cordial approbation of their conduct. By command of Brig.-Gen. Buell. James B. Fry, A. A. G., Chief of Staff. General Thomas's report to General Buell. headquarters First division, Department of the Ohio, Somerset, Ky., Jan. 31, 1862. Captain James B. Fry, A. A. G., Chief of Staff, Headquarters Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky.: Captain: I have the honor to report that in carrying out the instructions of the General commanding the department, contained in his communications of the twenty-ninth of December, I reached Logan's Cross Roads, about ten miles north of the intrenched camp of the enemy, on the Cumberland River, on the seventeenth inst., with a portion of the Second and Third brigades, Kinney's batter
Doc. 23.-launch of Ericsson's battery. New-York, Jan. 31, 1862. The Ericsson Floating Battery, for the United States Government, was yesterday safely launched from the Continental Iron Works, Greenpoint, where it has been building for the last three months. The launch took place at about ten o'clock in the morning. Notwithstanding the early hour, the drizzling rain, the wretched state of travelling in the streets, and the fact that no notice had been given of the intended event, a very large crowd had collected along the wharf, consisting of workmen, residents of the neighborhood, and many persons of prominence in naval affairs, who had watched the undertaking with interest from its inception. In consequence of the novel construction of the vessel, and the vast amount of iron upon her, there was much anxiety felt as to the possibility of making her float, and it was strenuously maintained by many — and bets were offered and taken on the question — that she would sink as c
Doc. 115.-battle of the deserted House, Va. A National account. Suffolk, Va., January 31, 1862. The engagement with the rebels, which took place yesterday, proves to have been more important and formidable than was at first supposed, and we have won a dear-bought victory. Our loss is now ascertained to be twenty-four killed and eighty wounded, while that of the rebels must have been about the same, if not greater. The enemy managed to carry off their killed and wounded, with the exception of one major, a lieutenant, and a number of privates, whose bodies, divested of boots and whatever of clothing there was time to take away, were found upon the field as our troops returned from the pursuit of the retreating foe. The conflict was a sanguinary one, and nothing but the indomitable courage of our soldiers and the judicious management of Gen. Corcoran and Col. Spear saved to us success. I learn the following particulars this morning: It seems that Gen. Pryor pushed his
guments I used in support of the plan of campaign which commended itself to my judgment. Let me here call attention to the President's orders of Jan. 27 and Jan. 31, 1862, and his letter to me of Feb. 3, answered in mine of the same day to the Secretary of War: President's general War order, no. 1. executive Mansion, Was land and naval forces, will severally be held to their strict and full responsibilities for prompt execution of this order. Abraham Lincoln. The order of Jan. 31, 1862, was as follows: President's special way order, no. 1. executive Mansion, Washington, Jan. 31, 1862. Ordered, That all the disposable force of the AJan. 31, 1862. Ordered, That all the disposable force of the Army of the Potomac, after providing safely for the defence of Washington, be formed into an expedition for the immediate object of seizing and occupying a point upon the railroad southwestward of what is known as Manassas Junction, all details to be in the discretion of the commander-in-chief, and the expedition to move before or o
had written the foregoing, and all the succeeding chapters on kindred subjects, a friend, in October, 1880, furnished me with a copy of a paper relating to the conference at Fairfax Court House, which seems to require notice at my hands. Therefore I break the chain of events to insert here some remarks in regard to it. The paper appears to have been written by General G. W. Smith, and to have received the approval of Generals Beauregard and J. E. Johnston, and to bear the date of January 31, 1862. It does not agree in some respects with my memory of what occurred, and is not consistent with itself. It was not necessary that I should learn in that interview the evil of inactivity. My correspondence of anterior date might have shown that I was fully aware of it, and my suggestions in the interview certainly did not look as if it was necessary to impress me with the advantage of action. In one part of the paper it is stated that the reenforcements asked for were to be seaso
e Williamsburg remark of Hancock retreat up the Peninsula sub-terra shells used evacuation of Norfolk its occupation by the enemy. In A previous chapter the retreat of our army from Centreville has been described, and reference has been made to the anticipation of the commanding general, J. E. Johnston, that the enemy would soon advance to attack that position. Since the close of the war we have gained information not at that time to us attainable, which shows that, as early as January 31, 1862, the commanding general of the enemy's forces presented to his President an argument against that line of operations, setting forth the advantages of a movement by water transports down the Chesapeake into the Rappahannock; that in the following February, by the direction of President Lincoln, General McClellan held a council with twelve of the generals of that army, who decided in favor of the movement by way of Annapolis, and thence to the Rappahannock, to which their President gave h
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