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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 103 103 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 17 17 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 14, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
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hey feel as though their future was very dark. March 11th, 1862. Yesterday we heard good news from the mouth of James River. The ship Virginia, formerly the Merrimac, having been completely incased with iron, steamed out into Hampton Roads, ran into the Federal vessel Cumberland, and then destroyed the Congress, and ran the Minnesota ashore. Others were damaged. We have heard nothing further; but this is glory enough for one day, for which we will thank God and take courage. March 13th, 1862. Our hearts are overwhelmed to-day with our private grief. Our connection, Gen. James McIntosh, has fallen in battle. It was at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, on the 7th, while making a dashing cavalry charge. He had made one in which he was entirely successful, but seeing the enemy reforming, he exclaimed, We must charge again. My men, who will follow me? He then dashed off, followed by his whole brigade. The charge succeeded, but the leader fell, shot through the heart. The soldiers r
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 21: slavery and Emancipation.--affairs in the Southwest. (search)
ame time, repress any efforts the slaves might make for their actual freedom. He also declared that any State in which rebellion had existed that should have in Congress at that time Jan. 1, 1863. representatives chosen in good faith, at a legal election, by the qualified voters of such State, should have the benefit of such conclusive evidence of its loyalty, and be exempted from the operations of the threatened proclamation. He called their attention to the acts of Congress approved March 13, 1862, and July 16, 1862, bearing upon the subject, as his warrant for the warning. It seemed as if this preliminary proclamation would indeed be as inoperative as the Pope's bull against the Comet. It was made instrumental in firing the Southern heart and intensifying the rebellious feeling, for it was pointed to by the conspirators, and their followers and friends in all parts of the Republic, as positive evidence that the war was waged, not for the restoration of the Union, but for the
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), March 9-14, 1862.-expedition toward Pardy and operations about Crump's Landing, Tenn. (search)
dient servant, C. F. Smith, Brigadier-General, Commandig. Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters District of West Tennessee, Fort Henry, Ten. No. 2.-reports of Brig. Gen. Lewis Wallace, U. S. Army. headquarters, Linton's Farm, March 13, 1862. Sir: Say to the general that all is right with my division so far. A person this p. m. says Cheatham is on my left, with from 15,000 to 18,000 men, who were marched from Bethel yesterday to occupy Crump's Landing, where we disembarked. Hd position to cover our cavalry. According to information Cheatham is only distant about 4 miles. Very respectfully, lew. Wallace, General, Commanding Third Division. Captain McMichael. headquarters Third Division, Crump's Landing, March 13, 1862. Sir: Say to the general that my entire command has returned safely and successfully. Major Hayes has extended his orders by cutting away about half a mile of trestle-work over a swamp, now impassable, on the north side of Purdy. While
. 2.-Lieut. Charles H. Thurber, Battery I, First Missouri Light Artill. No. 3.-Capt. John T. Croft, Fifth Iowa Cavalry. No. 4.--Ma. Gen. Leonidas Polk, C. S. Army. No. 1.-report of Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant, U. S. Army. Fort Henry, March 13, 1862. Learning that rebel troops had assembled at Paris for the purpose of enforcing conscription orders of Governor Harris, I sent night before last a portion of Curtis' Horse, Fifty-second Indiana, and Bulliss' battery. The enemy were driveant Chas. H. Thurber, First Lieutenant, Commanding Battery. Chester Harding, Jr., Adjt. Gen. State of Missouri. No. 3.-report of Capt. John T. Croft, Fifth Iowa Cavalry. headquarters First Battalion Curtis' horse, Fort Heiman, March 13, 1862. Sir: In accordance with your instructions I left Fort Heiman during the night of the 11th. Proceeded with Bulliss' battery of Saint Louis and the First Battalion of Curtis' Horse [Fifth Iowa Cavalry] to Henry County, Tennessee, to afford
ivar. G. T. Beauregard. Jackson, Tenn., March 13, 1862. Major-General Polk: Dispatch your infame to Iuka. James R. Chalmers. Corinth, March 13, 1862. Major-General Bragg, Jackson, Tenn.: Iand Assistant Adjutant-General. Jackson, March 13, 1862. General Ruggles, Corinth: All of our a headquarters Western Department, Decatur, March 13, 1862. 1. Lieut. Col. D. Beltzhoover is appoiers District of East Tennessee, Knoxville, March 13, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adjutant-General C. S.Lee, General, Commanding. Richmond, Va., March 13, 1862. General Humphrey Marshall, Lebanon, Russe yours, Jefferson Davis. Richmond, Va., March 13, 1862. Brig. Gen. Humphrey Marshall, Commanding,eral. Lebanon, Russell County, Virginia, March 13, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspectore first one was as follows: Corinth, March 13, 1862. Brigadier-General Chalmers, Iuka: The following dispatch: Jackson, Tenn., March 13, 1862. Brigadier-General Chalmers, Iuka: Move[6 more...]
ne, First Wisconsin; Captain McNally, Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, will assemble in Nashville at 12 m. on the 14th instant, to examine into the rights of ownership in cases of all stores and property in dispute in this city between citizens on the one hand and officers and agents of the Government on the other. * * * * * * * By command of General Buell: J. M. Wright, Assistant Adjutant-General. General orders, no. 1. Hdqrs. Department of the Mississippi, Saint Louis, March 13, 1862. I. In compliance with the orders of the President of the United States the undersigned hereby assumes command of the Department of the Mississippi, which includes the present Department of Kansas and the Missouri and the Department of the Ohio and country west of a north and south line drawn through Knoxville, Tenn., and east of the western boundaries of the States of Missouri and Arkansas. Headquarters of the Department of the Mississippi will remain, until further orders, at Sai
t's order No. 3, of March 8, was considered. As future events made the action of this council of considerable importance, the memorandum of its proceedings is here given in full:-- Headquarters, army of the Potomac, Fairfax Court-House, March 13, 1862. A council of the generals commanding army corps, at the Headquarters of the Army of the Potomac, were of the opinion-- I. That the enemy having retreated from Manassas to Gordonsville, behind the Rappahannock and Rapidan, it is the opithousand men for the defence of the city would suffice. (Sumner.) This was assented to by General McClellan, and immediately communicated to the War Department; and on the same day the following reply was received:-- War Department, March 13, 1862. The President, having considered the plan of operations agreed upon by yourself and the commanders of army corps, makes no objection to the same, but gives the following directions as to its execution:-- 1. Leave such force at Manassa
e and Alexandria and Acqnia and Richmond( Railroads. (Unanimous.) N. B. That with the forts on the right bank of the Potomac fully garrisoned, and those on the left bank occupied, a covering force in front of the Virginia line of 25,000 men would suffice. (Keyes, Heintzelman and McDowell.) A total of 40,000 men for the defense of the city would suffice. (Sumner.) This decision, being communicated to the War Department, was promptly responded to as follows: War Department, March 13, 1862. To Maj.-Gen. Geo. B. Mcclellan : The President, having considered the plan of operations agreed upon by yourself and the commanders of army corps, makes no objection to the same, but gives the following directions as to its execution: 1st. Leave such force at Manassas Junction as shall make it entirely certain that the enemy shall not repossess himself of that position and line of communication. 2d. Leave Washington entirely secure. 3d. Move the remainder of the force d
y be in good faith represented in the Congress of the United States, by members chosen thereto at elections wherein a majority of the qualified voters of such State shall have participated, shall, in the absence of strong countervailing testimony, be deemed conclusive evidence that such State, and the people thereof, are not then in rebellion against the United States. That attention is hereby called to an act of Congress entitled An act to make an additional Article of War, approved March 13th, 1862; and which act is in the words and figures following: Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That hereafter the following shall be promulgated as an additional article of war for the government of the Army of the United States, and shall be obeyed and observed as such: section 1. All officers or persons in the military or naval service of the United States are prohibited from employing any of the forces und
ceived by the Senate and referred to its Military Committee, it was duly reported March 4. therefrom by Mr. II. Wilson; vehemently opposed by Messrs. Garret Davis, of Ky., Carlile, of Va., Saulsbury, of Del., and supported by Messrs. Wilson, of Mass., Howard, of Michigan, Sherman, of Ohio, McDougall, of Cal., and Anthony, of R. I., and passed: Marcy 10. Yeas 29; Nays 9--a party vote, save that Mr. McDougall, of Cal., voted Yea. The bill thus enacted was approved by the President, March 13th, 1862. Gen. Wilson, upon evidence that the above act was inadequate to restrain the negro-catching propensitives of some officers in the service, proposed April 3. further action to the same end; and the Senate considered April 14. his resolution of inquiry. Mr. Grimes, of Iowa, in supporting it made a statement as follows: In the month of February last, an officer of the 3d regiment of Iowa infantry, stationed at a small town in Missouri. succeeded in capturing several Rebel b
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