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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
e mail, and any contractor who shall employ, or permit any other than a free white person to carry, the mail, shall for every such offence, incur a penalty of twenty dollars. This bill was to blacken the statute book no longer. On the 18th of March, 1862, Mr. Sumner asked and obtained the unanimous consent of the Senate to introduce a bill to remove all disqualifications of color, in carrying the mails. It was reported back on the 27th of the month, by Mr. Collamer, of Vermont, Chairman oied by those governments, were abandoned and vacated. He continues: That patriot Senator, Andrew Johnson,—faithful among the faithless. the Abdiel of the South,—began his attempt to reorganize Tennessee by an Address, as early as the 18th of March, 1862, in which he made ruse of these words:— I find most, if not all, of the offices, both State and Federal, vacated, either by actual abandonment, or by the action of the incumbents in attempting to subordinate their functions to a power<
Xxviii. Another infamous law had stood upon the statute books of the United States, from March 3, 1825, for more than a third of a century. It was as follows: That no other than a free white person shall be employed in conveying the mail, and any contractor who shall employ, or permit any other than a free white person to carry, the mail, shall for every such offence, incur a penalty of twenty dollars. This bill was to blacken the statute book no longer. On the 18th of March, 1862, Mr. Sumner asked and obtained the unanimous consent of the Senate to introduce a bill to remove all disqualifications of color, in carrying the mails. It was reported back on the 27th of the month, by Mr. Collamer, of Vermont, Chairman of the Committee on Post-offices, without amendment, and passed. But in the House, it was laid on the table, by a large majority, on motion of Mr. Colfax. It was renewed, however, by Mr. Sumner, in the next Congress, and became a law. The original of the
endless mazes, he asserts the plain fact that, for the time being, in the absence of a loyal government, those States could take no part and perform no function in the Union or in the administration of civil government. The bright spaces once occupied by those governments, were abandoned and vacated. He continues: That patriot Senator, Andrew Johnson,—faithful among the faithless. the Abdiel of the South,—began his attempt to reorganize Tennessee by an Address, as early as the 18th of March, 1862, in which he made ruse of these words:— I find most, if not all, of the offices, both State and Federal, vacated, either by actual abandonment, or by the action of the incumbents in attempting to subordinate their functions to a power in hostility to the fundamental law of the State, and subversive of her national allegiance. In employing the word vacated, Mr. Johnson hit upon the very term which, in the famous resolution of 1688, was held to be most effective in dethroning K<