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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 3 3 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 8, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 2 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 2 Browse Search
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Resaca, Ga. 4     Present, also, at Waynesboro, Tenn.; Shiloh, Miss.; Siege of Corinth; Munfordville, Ky.; Perryville, Ky.; Marcy's Creek, Ga.; Adairsville, Ga.; Jonesboro, Ga. notes.--Organized at Camp Dick Robinson, Ky., and mustered into the United States service on October 8, 1861. During its first six months of active service, it was stationed at various places in Kentucky, having been assigned to Hascall's Brigade, of Wood's Division. It embarked for Nashville on the 18th of March, 1862, marching thence with Buell's Army to the battle-field of Shiloh, where it arrived at the close of the fighting. After participating in the Siege of Corinth, it marched with Buell through Northern Alabama, Tennessee and Kentucky to Louisville; thence on the Perryville campaign, and then to Nashville, where it arrived in December, 1862. At the battle of Stone's River--still in Wood's Division — it was actively engaged, with a loss of 14 killed, 85 wounded, and 34 missing, Colonel McKe
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 9: battle of Shiloh. March and April, 1862. (search)
Ridge. I will send down a good many boats to-day, to be employed as you may direct; and would be obliged if you would send a couple of thousand sacks of corn, as much hay as you an possibly spare, and, if possible, a barge of coal. I will send a steamboat under care of the gunboat, to collect corn from cribs on the river-bank I have the honor to be your obedient servant, W. T. Sherman, Brigadier-General commanding First Division. headquarters, steamboat Continental, Pittsburg, March 18, 1862. Captain Rawlins, Assistant Adjutant-General to General Grant. sir: The division surgeon having placed some one hundred or more sick on board the Fanny Bullitt, I have permitted her to take them to Savannah. There is neither house nor building of any kind that can be used for a hospital here. I hope to receive an order to establish floating hospitals, but in the mean time, by the advice of the surgeon, allow these sick men to leave. Let me hope that it will meet your approbation.
Doc. 88.-fight at Paris, Tenn. Gen. Halleck's despatch. headquarters Department of the Mississippi, St. Louis, March 18, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Our artillery and cavalry yesterday attacked the enemy's works one and a half miles west of Paris, Tenn. The enemy was driven out, with the loss of one hundred killed, wounded, and prisoners. Our loss, Capt. Bull, of the artillery, and four men killed and five wounded. A cavalry force, sent out from Lebanon, Mo., attacked one of Price's guerrilla parties, killed thirteen, wounded five, and captured over twenty prisoners, among whom was Brig.-Gen. E. Campbell, the commander. H. W. Halleck, Major-General.
Doc. 97.-escape of the Nashville. The following letter gives the particulars of the escape of the Nashville: United States bark Gemsbok, Blockading off Beaufort, N. C., March 18, 1862. we think it but right to let the public know the situation of this blockade, and especially so since the rebel steamer Nashville has run the blockade of this harbor in and out again. When the Nashville ran in on the morning of the twenty-eighth of February last, there was only the State of Georgia on this blockade to protect three entrances — which it is impossible for one steamer to do. Three days after the Nashville had run in this vessel arrived here from Hampton Roads, and we found to our mortification such to be the case. The State of Georgia being short of coal could remain here but a few days. She despatched at once the facts of the case to the nearest blockading station — Wilmington. The Mount Vernon then left there, and proceeded to Hampton Roads with the intelligence. The Ca
Doc. 98.-the fight at Salem, Arkansas. The following is General Halleck's official despatch to Secretary Stanton, announcing the result of the fight at Salem, Arkansas: St. Louis, March 18, 1862. To Secretary Stanton: A scouting party, under Lieut.-Col. Wood and Major Drake, consisting of about two hundred and fifty men of the Sixth Missouri and Third Iowa cavalry, encountered near Salem, Arkansas, about one thousand of the enemy, under Cols. Coleman, Woodsides, and McFarland. After a severe fight the enemy was defeated, with the loss of Col. Woodsides, and about one hundred killed and wounded, and a considerable number of prisoners. Our loss was twenty-five killed and wounded, H. W. Halleck, Major-General.
deavor to obtain their release and return to their allegiance, upon terms alike compatible with the interests of the Government and the honor of the soldier. 4. That the forbearance, moderation, and gentlemanly deportment of the officers and soldiers of the Federal army, since their occupation of Tennessee, challenge our highest admiration. 5. That this meeting most cordially approve of the address made to the people of Tennessee by his Excellency Governor Andrew Johnson, dated March eighteenth, 1862, and the policy of his administration since that time. 6. That a committee of five be appointed by the chairman, who shall prepare an address to the people of Tennessee expressive of the objects of the meeting. Doc. 98.-Lieutenant Flusser's letter to the Mayor of Elizabeth City, N. C. U. S. Steamer Commodore Perry off Elizabeth City, Sunday, May 18, 1862. Sir: There being no confederate troops in this city or its vicinity, any persecution of Union people that may occ
e accomplishment of this object, so vital to our future peace and happiness. 3. That the chairman of this meeting appoint a committee of three, to take into consideration the condition of the prisoners of war from Tennessee now held in custody by the Government, and endeavor to obtain their release and return to their allegiance, upon terms alike compatible with the interests of the Government and the honor of the soldier. 4. That the forbearance, moderation, and gentlemanly deportment of the officers and soldiers of the Federal army, since their occupation of Tennessee, challenge our highest admiration. 5. That this meeting most cordially approve of the address made to the people of Tennessee by his Excellency Governor Andrew Johnson, dated March eighteenth, 1862, and the policy of his administration since that time. 6. That a committee of five be appointed by the chairman, who shall prepare an address to the people of Tennessee expressive of the objects of the meeting.
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
ounded. Confed. 100 wounded. March 14, 1862: Newberne, N. C. Union, 51st N. Y., 8th, 10th, and 11th Conn., 21st, 23d, 24th, 25th, and 27th Mass., 9th N. J., 51st Pa., 4th and 5th R. I. Confed., 7th, 26th, 33d, 35th N. C. Losses: Union 91 killed, 466 wounded. Confed. 64 killed, 106 wounded, 413 captured. March 16, 1862: pound Gap, Tenn. Union, Detachs. of 22d Ky., 40th and 42d Ohio Vols., and 1st Ohio Cav. Confed., 21st Va. Losses: Confed. 7 killed. March 18, 1862: Salem, or spring River, Ark. Union, Detachments 6th Mo., 3d Ia. Cav. The garden of a Southern mansion Here we see the garden of the manor house of John E. Seabrook on Edisto Island, off the Carolina coast. It is now in possession of the Federal troops, but the fine old house was unharmed, and the garden, although not in luxuriant bloom, gives an idea of its own beauty. In the distance are seen the slave quarters, and some of the old plantation servants have mingled with the t
of the Mississippi. William L. Cabell led a brigade of Arkansas Cavalry. John S. Roane, in commission at little Rock, Ark. Merid ian, Mississippi, May 11, 1865, and died March 13, 1890. Brigadier-General John Bordenave Villepigue (U. S.M. A. 1854) was born in Camden, South Carolina, July 2, 1830, and resigned from the army in March, 1861, to enter the Confederate service. As colonel, he was temporarily in command of the Army of Mobile. He was appointed brigadier-general, March 18, 1862. He was in command at Fort Pillow at the time of FlagOfficer Davis's attack, May-June, 1862, and commanded a brigade at the battle of Corinth, October 4th. He died at Port Hudson, Louisiana, November 9, 1862, as the result of illness. Villepigue was considered one of the most promising young officers in the Confederate service, and his untimely death was greatly deplored. Central Army of Kentucky Brigadier-General S. B. Buckner assumed command of the forces in Central Kentuc
r. 13, 1865. Woodbury, D. P., Aug. 15, 1864. Woods, Chas. R., Mar. 13, 1865. Wright, H. G., Mar. 13, 1865. Major-generals, U. S. Volunteers (full rank) Banks, N. P., May 16, 1861. Barlow, F. C., May 25, 1865. Berry, H. G., Nov. 29, 1862. Birney, David D., May 3, 1863. Blair, Frank P., Nov. 29, 1862. Blunt, James G., Nov. 29, 1862. Brooks, W. T. H., June 10, 1863. Buell, Don Carlos, Mar. 21, 1862. Buford, John, July 1, 1863. Buford, N. B., Mar. 13, 1865. Burnside, A. E., Mar. 18, 1862. Butler, Benj. F., May 16, 1861. Cadwalader, G. B., Apr. 25, 1862. Clay, Cassius M., April 11, 1862. Couch, Darius N., July 4, 1862. Cox, Jacob Dolson, Oct. 6, 1862. Crittenden, T. L., July 17, 1862. Curtis, S. R., Nov. 21, 1862. Dana, N. J. T., Nov. 29, 1862. Davies, Henry E., May 4, 1865. Dix, John A., May 16, 1861. Dodge, G. M., June 7, 1864. Doubleday, A., Nov. 29, 1862. Garfield, J. A., Sept. 19, 1863. Hamilton, C. S., Sept. 18, 1862. Hamilton, S., Sept. 17, 1862. He
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