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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 9 9 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 9 9 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 14, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 1 1 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 1 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 1 1 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 12: operations on the coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
le citizens, and to exercise a fostering care of the poor and ignorant colored people, from whose limbs the hand of the loyal victor had just unloosed the shackles of hopeless slavery. Mr. Colyer began his blessed work on Roanoke Island in February, and now, at the middle of March, he was made busy in the same high vocation at New Berne. When his labors in the hospitals were finished, he was placed in charge of the helpless of that town of every kind, by an order issued by Burnside, March 30, 1862. which read thus: Mr. Vincent Colyer is hereby appointed Superintendent of the Poor, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly. On the 24th of April, General Foster issued an order that all passes given to negroes by Mr. Colyer to go out of the lines be respected at the outposts, and that all persons outside, inquiring for him, be sent to him unquestioned. Mr. Colyer took for his headquarters a respectable dwelling in the town, and at once began the exercise of the most commendable
rce and attack on south side or cut off supplies, I do not think the rebels could remain there long. I forward herewith a rough sketch of the Gap and their works. I have ordered up the Thirty-third Indiana Regiment. Respectfully, &c., S. P. Carter, Acting Brigadier-General, Twelfth Brigade,. Capt. J, B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff. No. 2.-report of Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, C. S. Army. headquarters Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn., March 30, 1862. General: Col. J. E. Rains, commanding the post at Cumberland Gap, reports that on the evening of the 21st instant the enemy drove in the pickets and on the morning following appeared in his front. Having succeeded in placing two pieces of artillery in position on a neighboring ridge, they opened fire, which was kept up during the day (the 22d) with considerable vigor, as well as from small-arms at long range, but with little effect. List of casualties omitted shows 5 men wounded.
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
That the evacuation of Corinth was accomplished during the night of May 29 and morning of May 30, 1862. 6. That General Bragg relieved General Beauregard in the command of the forces at Tupelo in the latter part of June, 1862. 7. That Lieutenant-Colonel (then Major) McLean was acting as chief quartermaster of the Army of the Mississippi about March 12, 1862. 8. That Major McLean was appointed chief quartermaster of the Army of the Mississippi by General A. Sidney Johnston on March 30, 1862. 9. That Lieutenant-Colonel McLean was relieved from duty as chief quartermaster of the forces by General Bragg on July 4, 1862, at Tupelo, Miss. 10. That the Army of the Mississippi, while Lieutenant-Colonel McLean was its chief quartermaster, both at Corinth and Tupelo, was amply supplied with money, clothing, camp and garrison equipage, wagons, public animals, field transportation in general, and with all quartermaster's stores, with the exception of full rations of forage at
t, E. Kirby Smith, Major-General Commanding. Corinth, Miss., March 30, 1862. The President: I am not informed of any important movement Johnston, General. headquarters Western Department, Corinth, March 30, 1862. Capt. E. J. Sanders, Memphis, Tenn.: sir: Your letter of th orders, no. 1. Hdqrs. Army of the Mississippi, Corinth, Miss., March 30, 1862. The following officers are announced as chiefs of their res orders, no. 1. Hdqrs. Army of the Mississippi, Corinth, Miss., March 30, 1862. I. Martial law is hereby established at Jackson and Grenadaeneral. headquarters Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, March 30, 1862. General A. Sidney Johnston, Corinth, Miss.: General Maxey, anding. headquarters Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, March 30, 1862. Brig. Gen. D. Leadbetter, Kingston, Tenn.: General: I am inlay, Assistant Adjutant-General. headquarters, Richmond, Va., March 30, 1862. Brig. Gen. Humphrey Marshall, Commanding, &c., Lebanon, Va.:
nominations of brigadier-generals from Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Kentucky may be deferred until 1 can present by mail the names of officers of this army who have proved themselves worthy of promotion. D. C. Buell. Washington, March 30, 1862. Major-General Buell: Your telegram received and communicated to the Military Committee. I agree entirely with you and am glad you have made the point. The system pursued had been against my judgment and wishes. Edwin M. Stanton. Columbia, March 30, 1862. Major-General Halleck, Saint Louis: Telegraph received. I have refrained from giving the strength of my columns by telegraph, but will do so if you think it prudent. If my report said 90,000 it was an error in copying. It should have said about 55,000 effective. I fully appreciate the object of concentrating the greatest force possible on the point of attack, and of course am anxious to take with me all I can. I received your letter of the 21st to-day. I hope min
hington county. It was formed by uniting four companies of sharpshooters, which had been recruited through the efforts of Lieutenant-Colonel B. C. Butler, with companies formed under the superintendence of Colonel Crocker. The regiment left Albany on the 14th of February, 1862, with 998 rank and file, going to New York, where it encamped on Riker's Island until March 7th, when it went to Washington. Upon its arrival there it was attached to Palmer's Brigade of Casey's Division, and on March 30, 1862 embarked at Alexandria for the Peninsula campaign. The Ninety-third was detailed, May 21, 1862, as a guard at General Headquarters, and was retained on that duty successively by Generals Burnside, Hooker and Meade. The regiment was among the first to reenlist, going home in January, 1864, on the usual thirty days furlough allowed to veteran or reenlisted regiments. After nearly two years service at Army Headquarters, it was ordered on April 19, 1864, to report to General Birney's Divi
Doc. 116.-the trip of the Carondelet. St. Louis Democrat account. on board the gunboat Carondelet, off New-Madrid, April 5. on the thirtieth of March Com. Foote addressed to Capt. Henry Walke, commanding the gunboat Carondelet, the following order: U. S. Flag-steamer Benton, Off Island No.10, March 30, 1862. sir: You will avail yourself of the first fog or rainy night, and drift your steamer down past the batteries on the Tennessee shore and Island No.10, until you reach New-Madrid. I assign you this service, as it is vitally important to the capture of this place that a gunboat should be at New-Madrid, for the purpose of covering Gen. Pope's army while he crosses that point to the opposite or Tennessee side of the river, that he may move his army up to Island No.10, and attack the rebels in rear while we attack them in front. Should you succeed in reaching Gen. Pope, you will confer with him and adopt his suggestions so far as your superior knowledge of what y
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Missouri, 1862 (search)
arch 26: Skirmish, Gouge's MillMISSOURI--8th State Militia Cavalry (Detachment). March 26: Skirmish, Humansville, Polk Co.MISSOURI--8th State Militia Cavalry (Co's "A," "B," "D," "E"). Union loss, 2 killed, 4 wounded. Total, 6. March 28: Skirmish, WarrensburgILLINOIS--1st Cavalry. Union loss, 3 killed, 1 wounded. Total, 4. March 29: Skirmish on Blackwater, near WarrensburgIOWA--1st Cavalry (Co's "A," "F," "G"). MISSOURI--1st Arty. Detachment. Union loss, 1 killed, 22 wounded. Total, 23. March 30: Skirmish near ClintonIOWA--1st Cavalry (Detachment). Union loss, 1 wounded. March 31: Skirmish, Pink HillMISSOURI--1st Cavalry (Co. "D"). Union loss, 3 wounded. April 1: Skirmish on Little SniMISSOURI--1st Cavalry (Detachment). Booneville Battalion State Militia Cavalry (Detachment). Union loss, 2 wounded. April 1: Skirmish, Putnam's Ferry, DoniphanILLINOIS--5th Cavalry; 21st and 38th Infantry. OHIO--16th Indpt. Battery Light Arty. April --: Scout to Little Niangua, near QuincyMISSOURI
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
. Attached to 16th Michigan Infantry (which see). Jardine's Independent Company Sharpshooters. Organized at Saginaw, Michigan, May 3, 1864. Attached to 16th Michigan Infantry (which see). Company C 1st United States Sharpshooters. Organized August 21, 1861. (See 1st United States Sharpshooters.) Company I 1st United States Sharpshooters. Organized March 4, 1862. (See 1st United States Sharpshooters.) Company K 1st United States Sharpshooters. Organized March 30, 1862. (See 1st United States Sharpshooters.) Company B 2nd United States Sharpshooters. Organized October 4, 1861. (See 2nd United States Sharpshooters.) 1st Michigan Regiment Infantry. 3 months. Organized at Fort Wayne, Detroit, Michigan, and mustered into United States service May 1, 1861 (the only three-months Regiment from Michigan). Left State for Washington, D. C., May 13. Occupation of Arlington Heights, Va., May 24. Attached to Willcox's Brigade, Heintzel
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
w York Regiment Infantry (Morgan Rifles). Organized at Albany, N. Y., October, 1861, to January, 1862. Moved to New York City February 17, thence to Washington, D. C., March 7, 1862. Attached to 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May 18, 1862. Provost Guard, Army of the Potomac, to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1865. Service. Embarked at Alexandria, Va., for the Virginia Peninsula March 30, 1862. Siege of Yorktown, Va., April 5-May 4. Reconnoissance toward Lee's Mills April 29. Battle of Williamsburg, Va., May 5. Operations about Bottom's Bridge May 20-23 (Cos. A, F, H and K ). Duty at White House Landing May 19-June 25 (Cos. B, C, D, E, G and I ). Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Operations about White House Landing June 26-July 2. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battle of South Mountain September 14. Antietam September 16-17. Batt
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