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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 4 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 4 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 13: the capture of New Orleans. (search)
n the forts. Perceiving little chance for reducing the forts, Farragut prepared to execute another part of his instructions by running by them. On the 20th April, 1862. he called a council of captains in the cabin of the Hartford, when that measure was decided upon. General Butler, who had arrived with his staff, had been up out three hundred. God is certainly protecting us, he said. We are still cheerful, and have an abiding faith in our ultimate success. At sunset on the 23d, April, 1862. Farragut was ready for his perilous forward movement. The mortar-boats, keeping their position, were to cover the advance with their fire. Six gun-boats (Harapons and accouterments, they would send them to Beauregard's army at Corinth, as a slight token of their affection for the Confederate States. On the 30th, April, 1862. Farragut informed the city authorities that he should hold no further intercourse with a body whose language was so offensive, and that, so soon as General But
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
at the patriotic purposes of the loyalists, and to stir up the people of the Free-labor States to a counter-revolution. This had been their course for several months during the dark hours of the Republic, before the dawn at Gettysburg; and the more strenuous appeared the efforts of the Government to suppress the rebellion, the more intense was their zeal in opposing them. This opposition was specially exhibited when the President acted in accordance with the law of Congress, passed in April, 1862, for the enrollment of the National forces, and authorizing the Executive to make drafts, at his discretion, from such enrolled citizens for service in the army. So early as the 20th of August, 1861, General McClellan, then in command of the Army of the Potomac, had recommended such enrollment and conscription. The Act of April 18, 1862, provided for the enrollment of all able-bodied masculine citizens, including aliens who had declared their intentions to become naturalized, between
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 13: building a navy on the Western rivers.--battle of Belmont. (search)
cessary to the Federal Government to enable it to crush out rebellion, and the only way to obtain this control was to build a fleet peculiarly adapted to smooth and shallow waters, while carrying the heaviest smooth-bore and rifled ordnance. Strange as it may at this day appear, some of the Army officers argued that gunboats would be useless to co-operate with the Army in the West, as the Confederates would establish heavy forts all along the rivers, and knock the vessels to pieces; in April, 1862, after the war had progressed for a year, General Leonidas Polk seized upon tie heights near Belmont, Ky., and mounting heavy guns there blocked the way for Army transports from Cairo to the sea. Then the Army began to talk of improvising a Navy of their own, and the Navy Department sent Commander John Rodgers to St. Louis to superintend the construction of an army flotilla. While the North had its Ericsson, the West was fortunate in possessing, in the person of Mr. James B. Eads, the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
erience. Rear-Admiral Smith, with the other officers whom Mr. Secretary Welles had to assist him, formed a fine combination, and although the former was advanced in years at the breaking out of the war, and not very robust, yet he was ever punctual in the performance of his duties. Such men as we have mentioned assisted greatly in lightening the labors of the venerable Secretary of the Navy, and enabled him to carry the Navy successfully through a great crisis. It was sometime in April, 1862, that the Department determined to build up an ironclad navy on the Ericsson idea, and by December of that year twenty single-turreted Monitors were contracted for, or under construction, all their plans having been made ready for the assembling of Congress. These vessels were to be of about 614 tons displacement, excepting a few of 844 tons. They were very much larger than the original Monitor and were designed to carry two 15-inch guns in a revolving turret. The idea of the first Mon
April 6-7, 1862.-battle of Pittsburg Landing, or Shiloh, Tenn. Reports, etc. No. 1.-Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck, U. S. Army, commanding Department of the Mississippi. No. 2.-Organization of the Union forces engaged and return of casualties, compiled from the nominal lists, returns, &c., for April, 1862. Army of the Tennessee. No. 3-Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding Army of the Tennessee, with abstracts from the field returns of the several divisions, April 4-5 and April 10-15, 1862. No. 4.-Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand, U. S. Army, commanding First Division. No. 5.-Col. Abraham M. Hare, Eleventh Iowa Infantry, commanding First Brigade. No. 6.-Col. Marcellus M. Crocker, Thirteenth Iowa Infantry, commanding First Brigade. No. 7.-Capt. Robert H. Sturgess, Eighth Illinois Infantry. No. 8.-Capt. J. J. Anderson, Eighteenth Illinois Infantry. No. 9.-Lieut. Col. William Hall, Eleventh Iowa Infantry. No. 10.-Col. Marcellus M. Crocker, Thirteenth I
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 7-12, 1862.--raid on Confederate line of communications between Chattanooga, Tenn., and Marietta, Ga. (search)
nt Ohio Volunteers, taken. at this office on the 25th instant, in compliance with your written instructions, from which the following facts will appear: These non-commissioned officers and privates belonged to an expedition set on foot in April, 1862, at the suggestion of Mr. J. J. Andrews, a citizen of Kentucky, who led it, and under the authority and direction of General O. M. Mitchel, the object of which was to destroy the communications on the Georgia State Railroad between Atlanta ando. 2.-letter from Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell, U. S. Army. Saratoga, August 5, 1863. Sir: In the Official Gazette of the 21st ultimo I see a report of Judge-Advocate-General Holt, dated March 27, relative to an expedition set on foot in April, 1862, under the authority and direction, as the report says, of General O. M. Mitchel, the object of which was to destroy the line of communications on the Georgia State Railroad between Atlanta and Chattanooga. The expedition was set on foot unde
now hold a hundred miles of the great railway line of the rebel Confederacy. We have nothing more to do in this region, having fully accomplished all that was ordered. We have saved the great bridge across the Tennessee, and are ready to strike the enemy, if so directed, upon his right flank and rear at Corinth. Respectfully, O. M. Mitchel, Brgadier-General. General Buell. Abstract from record of events, Third Division, Army of the Ohio. from Division return for month of April, 1862. The Eighth Brigade left Murfreesborough, Tenn., on April 5, at 6 a. m., and marched to Huntsville, Ala., arriving there at 7.30 a. m., on the 11th. At 6 p. m., April 11, the Twenty-fourth Illinois were moved on cars for Decatur, arriving opposite Decatur on the morning of the 12th, driving the enemy's troops from the fortifications at Decatur, and saving the bridge over the Tennessee River that the rebels had fired on their retreat, occupying the town on the 13th. The rest of the
te of last monthly return. Officers. Men. 1st Alabama46185173  2d Alabama and 1st Confederate Battalion19306519587721 12th Louisiana315931,0401,2111,054 McCown (Louisiana) regiment27440520591552 31st Tennessee33588765799870 Artillery battalion22246442548458 Pointe Coupee Light Artillery3152163165131 Sappers and Miners, A and B543739961 Total1442,4293,6074,1733,847 Abstract from return (approximate) of the Department of East Tennessee, Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith commanding, for April, 1862. dated April 24, 1862. [headquarters, Knoxville, Tenn.] Troops. Present for duty. Aggregate present. Aggregate present and absent. Pieces of field artillery. Remarks Officers. Men. First (Leadbetter's) Brigade1031,5582,2173,048452d Georgia unarmed. Second (Stevenson's) Brigade 195 2,763 3,729 4,922 6 42d Georgia and 36th Tennessee badly armed — country rifles. Third Brigade (Reynolds' Brigade) 2 830 834 872 4 39th and 43d Georgia. Supposed effective strength. Officers not reported
ued orders to all the military forces of our country, retained likewise the immediate and especial command of this grand army of 200,000 men, apparently fatigued by the necessity of framing excuse after excuse for its inaction, Gen. John G. Barnard, Chief of Engineers to the Army of the Potomac, in a report to Gen. McClellan at the close of the Peninsula campaign, says: One of the prominent among the causes of ultimate failure was the inaction of eight months, from August, 18;1, to April, 1862. More than any other wars, Rebellion demands rapid measures. In November, 1861, the Army of the Potomac, if not fully supplied with all the materiel, was yet about as complete in numbers, discipline, and organization as it ever became. For four months, the great marine avenue to the capital of the nation was blockaded, and that capital kept in a partial state of siege, by a greatly inferior enemy, in face of a movable army of 150,000 men. In the Winter of 1861 and 1862, Norfolk cou
propriation bill in Senate, 526. Army Deficiency bill before the Senate, 526. army of the Cumberland, reorganized by Rosecrans, 270. army of the Ohio, composition of, under Buell; reorganized by Rosecrans, 270. army of the Potomac, inactivity of during the Winter of 1861-2, 107; organized into four corps by the President, 108; transported to Fortress Monroe, 110; advance to Manassas, 112; Peninsular campaign, 120 to 127; strength of, in Winter of 1861-2, 128-9; strength of, in April, 1862, 131; in McClellan's campaign before Richmond, 141 to 172; strength of, in June, 1862, 151159; at Harrison's Landing, 168; losses sustained by, during the Seven Days battles, 168-9; strength of, in July, 1862, 169; withdrawn from Harrison's Landing to Acquia Creek, 171; under command of Gens. Burnside and Hooker, 342 to 375; reorganized under Meade, 564; end of Grant's campaign of 1864 and losses of the, 597 Arnold, Gen., occupies Pensacola, 459. arson, during N. York and Brooklyn r
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