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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 7 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 7 7 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 6 6 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for April 30th, 1862 AD or search for April 30th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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Doc. 136.-capture of Island no.10. General Pope's official detailed report. headquarters army of the Mississippi, five miles from Corinth, Miss., April 30th, 1862. General: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations which resulted in the capture of Island No.10, and the batteries on the main shore, together with the whole of the land-forces of the enemy in that vicinity. A brief sketch of the topography of the immediate neighborhood seems essential to a full understanding of the operations of the army. Island No.10 lies at the bottom of a great bend of the Mississippi, immediately north of it being a long, narrow promontory on the Missouri shore. The river from Island No.10 flows north-west to New-Madrid, where it again makes a great bend to the south as far as Tiptonville, otherwise called Merriweather's Landing, so that opposite New-Madrid also is a long, narrow promontory. From Island No.8, about four miles above Island No.10 the distance a
ive power, we will do all we can. I should have demanded an unconditional surrender, but with such a force in your rear it was desirable to get possession of these Forts as soon as possible. The officers turned over everything in good order, except the walls and buildings, which are terribly shattered by the mortars. Very respectfully, D. D. Porter, Commanding Flotilla. Flag-Officer D. G. Farragut. Capitulation of the Forts. U. S. Steamer Harriet Lane, Mississippi River, April 30, 1862. sir: I enclose herewith the capitulation of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, which surrendered to the mortar flotilla on the twenty-eighth of April, 1862. I also enclose in a box (forwarded on this occasion) all the flags taken in the two Forts, with the original flag hoisted on Fort St. Philip when the State of Louisiana seceded. Fort Jackson is a perfect wreck; everything in the shape of a building in and about it was burned up by the mortar shells, and over eighteen hundred shell
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 153.-the Tennessee expedition. (search)
Doc. 153.-the Tennessee expedition. Cincinnati Commercial account. camp Shiloh, five miles from Pittsburgh Landing, April 30, 1862. on Sunday morning, twenty-seventh instant, Gen. Grant ordered Gen. Wallace to make a demonstration in the neighborhood of Purdy, a town of about eight hundred inhabitants, twenty-two miles distant from our camp, deriving a small degree of importance from its location on the Mobile and Ohio Railroad. It is about twenty miles from Corinth, on a direct railroad line. It was not known when the expedition started what force the rebels had at the point, but it was supposed they had a pretty strong garrison there, and were prepared to repel such a cavalry dash as is ordinarily made for the destruction of railroad bridges. Accordingly it was determined to send a large force, and to make the attack partake of the nature of a surprise. Seven regiments of infantry, from Gen. Wallace's division, including the Seventy-eighth and Twentieth Ohio, two bat
Doc. 154.-fight at Bridgeport, Ala. General Mitchel's despatch. Huntsville, Ala., April 30, 1862. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: on yesterday, the enemy having cut our wires, and attacked during the night one of our brigades, I deemed it my duty to head in person an expedition against Bridgeport. I started by a train of cars in the morning, followed by two aditional regiments of infantry, and two companies of cavalry. I found that our pickets had engaged the enemy'snd I now occupy Huntsville in perfect security, while all of Alabama, north of Tennessee River, floats no flag but that of the Union. O. M. Mitchel, Brig.-General Commanding Third Division. Chicago Tribune account. Bridgeport, Ala., April 30, 1862. Gen. Mitchel has finished his campaign by the complete victory which he gained over the forces of Gen. E. Kirby Smith, at this place, yesterday afternoon, and which you have doubtless had by telegraph. On Tuesday the march began, under c