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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 333 333 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 26 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 23 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 14 14 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 7 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for May, 1862 AD or search for May, 1862 AD in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
the ravine under the burning bridge. The re-enforcements for Beauregard were thus effectually cut off. Pope left a brigade to hold Farmington and menace Beauregard's right. Twenty thousand men, under Van Dorn, fell upon them on the 9th, May, 1862. and drove them back. Eight days afterward, Pope re-occupied the post with his whole force, and, at the same time, Sherman moved forward and menaced the Confederate left. On the 20th, Halleck's whole army was engaged in regular siege-operatioduty, and he was succeeded in command by Captain C. H. Davis, whose important services with Dupont at Port Royal we have already observed. See page 117. Hollins, meanwhile, had reformed his flotilla, and early in the morning of the 10th May, 1862. he swept around Point Craighead, on the Arkansas shore, with armored steamers. Several of them were fitted with strong bows, plated with iron, for pushing, and were called rams. Davis's vessels were then tied up at the river banks, three on
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 14: movements of the Army of the Potomac.--the Monitor and Merrimack. (search)
f the ten thousand troops under General Wool at Fortress Monroe, he was alarmed. The use of all these troops formed a part of his plan of operations against Richmond. He knew the ability and energy of Johnston, and anticipated what really happened, namely, the movement toward Richmond of the bulk of the Confederate army when it was ascertained that the National army was in force on the Peninsula. He therefore, from his Headquarters before Yorktown, sent a remonstrance to the Government May, 1862. against a further diminution of his force, declaring it to be his opinion that he would have to fight all the available troops of the Confederates not far from his position. Do not force me to do so, he said, with diminished numbers; but, whatever your decision may be, I will leave nothing undone to obtain success. He urgently requested Franklin's division of McDowell's corps to be sent to him, and it was done. Two days later, April 7. McClellan telegraphed to the War Department tha
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
ortions of the Asylum for the Insane. While these were thus provided for, the men fit for duty were allowed to rest more than two days, until the main body of the army moving up from the direction of Yorktown should arrive. Then, on the 8th, May, 1862. General Stoneman was sent forward with the advance to open a communication with Franklin, at the head of York, followed by Smith's division, on the most direct road to Richmond, by way of New Kent Court-House. The roads were left in a wretcheut it was not until after the evacuation of Yorktown, when President Lincoln and Secretaries Chase and Stanton visited Fortress Monroe, that his suggestions were favorably considered. He then renewed his recommendations; and when, on the 8th, May, 1862. he received positive information that Huger (who, with Burnside in his rear and McClellan on his flank, saw that his position was untenable) was preparing to evacuate that post, orders were given for an immediate attempt to seize Sewell's Poin
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
much injured; but at the time of the writer's visit it was in good order. The correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial, who was present, says, seven rebels were killed within the little inclosure in front of the General's cottage. Obliquely across the square was the public-house, known as the Verandah Hotel, kept by Dr. Gibson, the post-master of Corinth, when the writer visited that place. This was the Headquarters of General Bragg at the time of the siege of Corinth, at the close of May, 1862, and was one of the few dwellings in that village that survived the storms of the war. It was used as a hospital, and bore many scars made by the conflict. During the occupation of Corinth by the Confederate Army, General A. S. Johnston's quarters were at the Tishamingo Hotel (which was burned), Polk's were at the house of the widow Hayes, and Hardee's at the house of Dr. Stout. Bragg's Headquarters. opposite side of the square. But their triumph was short lived. The column that had p
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
t resistance. The Mayor refused to surrender it formally. So Commander Palmer, of the Iroquois, landed, and Baton Rouge. repossessed the National arsenal there. See notice of its capture by the insurgents on page 181, volume I. The large turreted building seen in the above picture, above al<*> the others, is the State-House of Louisiana. Farragut arrived soon afterward, and the naval force moved on, with the advance under Commander S. P. Lee, on the Oneida, as far as Vicksburg, May, 1862. without opposition. There the troops of Lovell, who fled from New Orleans, after having halted at different places, were now stationed. Lee sum moned May 18. the city to surrender, and was answered by a respectful refusal by the Mayor, and a preposterous note of defiance from James L. Autry, Military Governor and Commandant Post. I have to state, said Autry, that Mississippians don't know, and refuse to learn, how to surrender to an enemy. If Commodore Farragut or Brigadier-General