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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 21 21 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 15 15 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 11 11 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 4 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Operations of 1861 about Fort Monroe. (search)
ker, with his regiment, was sent in my place. It appeared, later, that Colonel Baker had desired that he should be substituted, and when objections were made he succeeded in overruling them [see p. 123]. After the battle between the Monitor and Merrimac [see Vol. I., p. 692], General Wool, seeing the advantage of opening the blockade of the James River, prepared for an attempt to recapture Norfolk. President Lincoln, with Secretaries Stanton and Chase, came to Fort Monroe, and on May 8th, 1862, the order was given and a movement made. Rear-Admiral Goldsborough, who had been ordered to assist, attacked the Confederate batteries at Sewell's Point retired, and for the hour, at least, the expedition was abandoned. News came to headquarters later in the day that General Huger was preparing to retire, and General Wool, after a trip to Willoughby's Point, decided to land his troops at Ocean View, thus taking in reverse the Confederate works. The landing of our troops was easily ef
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.38 (search)
eneral Shields reports ( Official Records, XII., Pt. I., p. 342): Our force in infantry, cavalry, and artillery did not exceed 7000. . . . We had 6000 infantry, a cavalry force of 750, and 24 pieces of artillery. Forces at McDowell, Va., May 8th, 1862. Brigadier-General Robert C. Schenck. Milroy's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert H. Milroy: 25th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. W. P. Richardson; 52d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Ebenezer H. Swinney; 73d Ohio, Col. Orland Smith; 75th Ohio, Col. Nathaniel C. McLean; 2d W2742 were engaged; 27 pieces of artillery, of which 18 were engaged. Owing to recent heavy cavalry duty and the extent of country to be protected, only 290 of this arm were present to take part in the engagement. Forces at McDowell Va., May 8th 1862. Major-General Thomas J. Jackson. Army of the Valley: Second Brigade, Col. John A. Campbell: 21st Va., Lieut.-Col. R. H. Cunningham; 42d Va., Maj. Henry Lane; 48th Va., Maj. James C. Campbell (w), Lieut. Samuel Hale; 1st Va. (Irish) Battali
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Union Army. (search)
ks; B, W. Va.; H, 1st Ohio, Capt. James F. Huntington; L, 1st Ohio, Capt. Lucius N. Robinson; E, 4th U. S., Capt. Joseph C. Clark, Jr. Artillery loss: k, 4; w, 2 6. Total loss (March 22d and 23d): killed, 118; wounded, 450; missing, 22 = 590. General Shields reports ( Official Records, XII., Pt. I., p. 342): Our force in infantry, cavalry, and artillery did not exceed 7000. . . . We had 6000 infantry, a cavalry force of 750, and 24 pieces of artillery. Forces at McDowell, Va., May 8th, 1862. Brigadier-General Robert C. Schenck. Milroy's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert H. Milroy: 25th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. W. P. Richardson; 52d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Ebenezer H. Swinney; 73d Ohio, Col. Orland Smith; 75th Ohio, Col. Nathaniel C. McLean; 2d W. Va., Col. John W. Moss; 3d W. Va., Lieut.-Col. Francis W. Thompson; I, 1st Ohio Art'y, Capt. Henry F. Hyman; 12th Ohio Battery, Capt. Aaron C. Johnson; 1st W. Va. Cav. (3 co's), Maj. John S. Krepps. Brigade loss: k, 20; w, 177; m, 2 = 199. Schenck
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Confederate Army. (search)
=18. Total loss (March 22d and 23d): killed, 80; wounded, 375; missing, 263 = 718. General Jackson, in his report ( Official Records, XII., Pt. I., p. 383), says: Our number present on the evening of the battle was, of infantry, 3087, of which 2742 were engaged; 27 pieces of artillery, of which 18 were engaged. Owing to recent heavy cavalry duty and the extent of country to be protected, only 290 of this arm were present to take part in the engagement. Forces at McDowell Va., May 8th 1862. Major-General Thomas J. Jackson. Army of the Valley: Second Brigade, Col. John A. Campbell: 21st Va., Lieut.-Col. R. H. Cunningham; 42d Va., Maj. Henry Lane; 48th Va., Maj. James C. Campbell (w), Lieut. Samuel Hale; 1st Va. (Irish) Battalion, Capt. B. W. Leigh. Brigade loss: w, 9. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William B. Taliaferro: 10th Va., Col. S. B. Gibbons (k), Lieut.-Col. E. T. H. Warren; 23d Va., Col. A. G. Taliaferro; 37th Va., Col. Samuel V. Fulkerson. Brigade loss: k, 12; w, 8
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
the enemy and destroy his defences, I deem it unnecessary to enter into any further detail of the exploits performed by the Mississippi, as we all must share alike in the honor of your victory. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Melancton Smith, Commander United States Navy. Flag-officer D. G. Farragut, Commanding Western Division Gulf Blockading Squadron. Report of Commander Charles S. Boggs, United States steamer Varuna. United States Steam Gun-Boat Cayuga, At sea, May 8, 1862. Sir — I have the honor to enclose herewith a duplicate of the report of Commander Boggs, late of the Varuna. and attached to my division of the attacking force. This gallant officer came up to my support when I had more of the enemy's steamers attacking me than I could well attend to. I afterwards saw him in conflict with three of the enemy's steamers, and directed Commander Lee, of the Oneida, to go to his support, which he did in the most dashing manner. Commander Bogg's descri
Sergeant Makimson for his coolness. When ordered to surrender he replied that he would not do it as long as he had a man alive. Although Sergeant Nelson had the command, from what I can learn I think the most credit is due to Sergeant Makimson. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. R. Chapin, Colonel Tenth Regiment Wisconsin Volunteers. Col. J. W. Sill, Commanding Ninth Brigade. No. 3.-report of Sergt. William Nelson, Tenth Wisconsin Infantry. Paint Rook Bridge, May 8, 1862. Sir: It seems that you did not get my report of the affair with the enemy at this bridge on the night of April 28, 1862. I therefore send you an outline, knowing that you are cognizant of the general outline of the skirmish through hearsay. On the night of April 28, 1862, the enemy's cavalry, 250 strong, assisted by a number of citizens, made an attack on the guard at this bridge, for the purpose of driving them out and burning the structure. Their attack was continued for more
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
around there, but they certainly were not in the open field when I returned from the woods. With respect, I remain, sir, your obedient servant, Wm. P. Innes, Col., Comdg. First Regiment, Michigan Engineers and Mechanics. Col. J. B. Fry, Chief of Staff, &c. No. 70.-report of Maj. John if. Foster, Third Ohio Cavalry, of skirmish near Corinth, Miss., May 9. Hdqrs. Third Regt. Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, Camp near Corinth, May 9, 1862. Sir: In compliance with your orders of May 8, 1862, I proceeded with two companies (L and M) of the Third Regiment Ohio Voluniteer Cavalry to relieve two companies of the same regiment on picket duty on the Corinth road, about 5 miles from Corinth. On coming up to the companies on duty I inquired of Capt. D. C. Doane, the officer in command, for instructions where to place my pickets. He said he was instructed to place them across the mud-hole, as he called it, the other side or south side of the woods. but had not done so, not conside
n, Assistant Adjutant-General.] headquarters Army of the West, May 8, 1862. Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones: General: Bring all of your troops baion. It is just received--11.30 p.m. G. T. B. Corinth, Miss., May 8, 1862--11.30 p. m. General Earl Van Dorn, Farmington Road, Miss.: Tal orders, no. 1. Hdqrs. Army of the Mississippi, Corinth Miss., May 8, 1862. I. On assuming command of the Army of the Mississippi the geGeneral. headquarters Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, May 8, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Vamanding. headquarters Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, May 8, 1862. Commanding officer, Kingston, Tenn.: sir: Information has berders, no. 106. Adjt. And Insp. General's Office, Richmond, Va., May 8, 1862. * * * * * * * XVI. Maj. Gen. William W. Loring is relieved hwestern Virginia, as by Paragraph XVI, Special Orders, No. 165, May 8, 1862, from the Office of Adjutant and Inspector General, it is not in
ving aid and comfort to the enemy must be arrested and sent to Camp Chase. You will not of course act on mere suspicion in these matters, but must not hesitate when the case is plain. It is possible that you may encounter a minor degree of organization or association among Kentucky rebels, but it is more probable that you will have to deal only with individual secessionists. Report by telegraph and mail frequently and on receipt of this. James B. Fry, Chief of Staff. headquarters, May 8, 1862. Major-General Halleck: A furious beating of bass drums is kept up in the right and left corps. It can be heard a distance of 4 or 5 miles; of course betrays our position and progress, and ought to be suppressed. Bass drums are not used with field music in my command at all. D. C. Buell. headquarters, May 11, 1862. Major-General Halleck: The line which I am occupying is about 24 miles long, and leaves my old position where two of Thomas' divisions are quite retired and protecte
Sept. 12, 1861 2 Scout, Aug. 1, 1863 1 Grafton, W. Va., Dec. 1, 1861 1 Honey Hill, S. C. 35 Camp Allegheny, W. Va., Dec. 13, 1861 11 Deveaux Neck, S. C. 6 Baldwin's Creek, W. Va., Dec. 31, 1861 3 Judson Hill, S. C. 1 McDowell, Va., May 8, 1862 12 Red Hill, S. C. 1 Cross Keys, Va. 10 Combahee Ferry, S. C. 2 Manassas, Va. 16 Guerillas 1 Chancellorsville, Va. 30 Place unknown 1 Gettysburg, Pa. 25     Present, also, at Green Brier, W. Va.; Huntersville, Va.; Monterey, ined several months engaged in active service, during which it took a prominent part in Milroy's fight at Camp Allegheny, where it lost 6 killed, 54 wounded, and 6 missing. While encamped with Milroy's troops at McDowell, Va., it participated, May 8, 1862, in the battle with Stonewall Jackson's command, in which the regiment lost 6 killed, 51 wounded, and 1 missing. At Cross Keys, it lost 5 killed, 40 wounded, and 5 missing; at Manassas — then in Schenck's Division — it lost 8 killed, 55 wounde<
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