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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 10 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 10 10 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 10, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for May 9th, 1862 AD or search for May 9th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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of the General's staff, that the seven prisoners, whom he had marched to the beach, were at his disposal. Their arms were taken away, and on promising to take the oath of allegiance the men were at once dismissed. One of them proved to be Moore himself, who came over to his house, where he found half a dozen of us in full possession, and just preparing to discuss a very comfortable supper which his colored cook had got ready for us. Baltimore American account. Fortress Monroe, May 9, 1862. Old Point this evening presents a very stirring spectacle. About a dozen steamers and transports are loading with troops. They will land on the shore opposite the Rip Raps, and march direct on Norfolk. At the time I commence writing--nine o'clock P. M.--the moon shines so brightly that I am sitting in the open air, in an elevated position, and writing by moonlight. The transports are gathering in the stream, and have on board artillery, cavalry, and infantry, and will soon be pr
Doc. 27.-proclamation of Gov. Johnson. Executive office, Nashville, Tenn., May 9, 1862. Whereas, certain persons, unfriendly and hostile to the Government of the United States, have banded themselves together, and are now going at large through many of the counties of this State, arresting, maltreating and plundering Union citizens wherever found: Now therefore, I, Andrew Johnson, Governor of the State of Tennessee, by virtue of the power and authority in me vested, do hereby proclaim that in every instance in which a Union man is arrested and maltreated by the marauding bands aforesaid, five or more rebels, from the most prominent in the immediate neighborhood, shall be arrested, imprisoned, and otherwise dealt with as the nature of the case may require; and further, in all cases where the property of citizens loyal to the Government of the United States is taken or destroyed, full and ample remuneration shall be made to them out of the property of such rebels in the vi
Doc. 28.-Emancipation of slaves. General Hunter's proclamation, May 9. headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General orders, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina, comprising the military department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law, in a free country, are altogether incompatible. The persons in these three States--Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina--heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. David Hunter, Major-General Commanding. Ed. W. Smith, Acting Adjutant-General.
Doc. 29.-the destitution of New-Orleans. General Butler's proclamation. headquarters Department of the Gulf, New-Orleans, May 9, 1862. General orders, No. 25. The deplorable state of destitution and hunger of the mechanics and working classes in this city has been brought to the knowledge of the Commanding General. He has yielded to every suggestion made by the city government, and ordered every method of furnishing food to the people of New-Orleans that that government desired. No relief by those officials has yet been afforded. This hunger does not pinch the wealthy and influential, the leaders of the rebellion, who have gotten up this war, and are now endeavoring to prosecute it, without regard to the starving poor, the working man, his wife and child. Unmindful of their suffering fellow-citizens at home, they have caused or suffered provisions to be carried out of the city for the confederate service since the occupation by the United States forces. Lafa
Doc. 42.-President Lincoln's proclamation. By the President of the United States. A proclamation. Whereas, There appears in the public prints what purports to be a proclamation of Major-General Hunter, in the words and figures following, to wit: headquarters Department of the South Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General orders No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida, and South-Carolina, comprising the Military Department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law in a free country are altogether incompatible. The persons in these three States, Georgia, Florida, and South-Carolina, heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. David Hunter, Major-Ge
tomac, it is but simple justice to claim that in contributing its aid to the other two arms, as far as lay in its power, it did its whole duty faithfully and intelligently, and that on more than one occasion (the battle of Malvern particularly) it confessedly saved the army from serious disaster. I am, General, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, William F. Barry, Army of the Potomac, Brigadier-General, late Chief of Artillery. Doc. 106.-fight at Slaterville, Va. Fought May 9, 1862. New-York times account New-Kent Court-House, Va., Saturday Evening, May 10, 1862. A lively skirmish occurred yesterday at a place called Slaterville, two miles below here, which reflects much credit upon our officers and men engaged in it. At three o'clock P. M. eighty men of the Sixth regular cavalry had advanced to Slaterville, when a considerable force of the enemy was observed directly in front. Our force charged upon the rebels, and obliged them to retreat precipitate
Doc. 106.-fight at Slaterville, Va. Fought May 9, 1862. New-York times account New-Kent Court-House, Va., Saturday Evening, May 10, 1862. A lively skirmish occurred yesterday at a place called Slaterville, two miles below here, which reflects much credit upon our officers and men engaged in it. At three o'clock P. M. eighty men of the Sixth regular cavalry had advanced to Slaterville, when a considerable force of the enemy was observed directly in front. Our force charged upon the rebels, and obliged them to retreat precipitately to the woods behind a hill on the left of the main road, after which we occupied the hill, with two pieces of artillery, and two companies of infantry — the Second Rhode Island and the Ninety-eighth Pennsylvania volunteers--besides the cavalry previously mentioned. Shortly after the enemy reappeared from the woods with three squadrons of cavalry, and two pieces of artillery, supported by one regiment infantry. He fired four times in quic