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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 10 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 10 10 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 10, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for May 9th, 1862 AD or search for May 9th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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This was the first fighting of the war. Meanwhile Lieut. A. J. Slemmer, commander at Fort Pickens across the inlet, was removing the Barrancas garrison and their families. He succeeded in getting all safely across in a vessel to Fort Pickens, and the guns of Fort Barrancas bearing upon the channel were spiked. The Florida and Alabama troops occupied the Fort on the 12th and began mounting twenty-five 32-pounders, which threatened Fort Pickens until the Confederates abandoned the works, May 9, 1862. The spirit of resistance Here a Confederate camera has caught the spirit of the Southern soldiers at the outbreak of the war. These are Captain G. W. Dowson's Perote Guards manning the Perote Sand Batteries at Mobile, January, 1861. On the 11th of January, 1861, the ordinance of secession was passed by the Alabama convention at Montgomery. Its announcement was received with great excitement throughout the State. In Mobile the Cadets and the Independent Rifles marched to the publ
ecure boats to ferry his army across the river that he might capture Island No.10. But the threatening cannon on the island forbade, in language without words, any attempt to pass them. The overflow of water on the peninsula was deep enough to float the transports, but a dense forest six miles in width prevented any such passage. At length a novel plan was devised — to cut a The Flag-officer's good-bye The decks of this staunch gunboat, the Benton, w<*>e crowded on the morning of May 9, 1862, by her officers and men waiting solemnly for the appearance of Commodore A. H. Foote. The Benton had been his flag-ship in the operations around Island No.10 and Fort Pillow; but the wound he had received at Fort Donelson continued to undermine his health until now, supported by Captain Phelps, he feebly made his way on deck to bid good-bye to his brave and faithful comrades and resign his command to Captain Charles H. Davis. At sight of him the old tars swung their hats and burst into
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
, 44th, 48th, 52d, 58th Va., 1st Va. (Irish) Battalion. Losses: Union 28 killed, 225 wounded, 3 missing. Confed. 75 killed, 424 wounded and missing. May 9, 1862: Elk River, Ala. Union, 1st Ky. Cav. Confed., Texas Rangers. Losses: Union 5 killed, 7 wounded. Confed. 45 missing. May 9, 1862: Norfolk, Va. May 9, 1862: Norfolk, Va. Evacuated by the Confederates. May 9, 1862: Farmington, Miss. Union, Gen. Plummer's Brigade, Army of the Mississippi. Confed., Gen. Ruggles' Division. Losses: Union 16 killed, 148 wounded, 192 missing. Confed. 8 killed, 189 wounded, 110 missing. May 10, 1862: Plum Point, near Fort Pillow, Tenn. Gunboat battlMay 9, 1862: Farmington, Miss. Union, Gen. Plummer's Brigade, Army of the Mississippi. Confed., Gen. Ruggles' Division. Losses: Union 16 killed, 148 wounded, 192 missing. Confed. 8 killed, 189 wounded, 110 missing. May 10, 1862: Plum Point, near Fort Pillow, Tenn. Gunboat battle. Union, Gunboats Cincinnati, Carondelet, Benton, Pittsburg, St. Louis, and Mound City. Confed., eight rams of the River Defense Fleet. Ohio soldiers who fought under Garfield for Kentucky The Forty-second Ohio Infantry was one of the regiments that helped to settle the position of Kentucky in the issue between the Sta