hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 10 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 10 10 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 10, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for May 9th, 1862 AD or search for May 9th, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Emancipation proclamations. (search)
ing that the emancipation clause of General Fremont's proclamation be so modified, held, and construed as to conform with and not to transcend the provisions on the same subject contained in the act of Congress approved Aug. 6, preceding. Another instance of the kind occurred at the hands of General Hunter, the following year. That officer, being in command at Hilton Head, N. C., proclaimed the States of Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina, in his department, under martial law, and May 9, 1862, issued an order in which occurred these words: Slavery and martial law in a free country are altogether incompatible. The persons in these States—Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina—heretofore held as slaves are therefore declared forever free. Though President Lincoln had been bitterly censured by extremists for his action towards General Fremont, and though he knew that to interfere with General Hunter would only bring upon him even a worse storm of reproaches, he did not shrink fro
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
s Jackson and St. Philip, the two forts guarding the Mississippi below New Orleans......April 24, 1862 Admiral Farragut occupies New Orleans......April 25, 1862 Gen. B. F. Butler occupies New Orleans with his troops......May 1, 1862 General Magruder evacuates Yorktown, Va.......May 4, 1862 Battle of Williamsburg, Va.......May 5, 1862 Gen. David Hunter proclaims emancipation of slaves, and authorizes arming all able-bodied negroes in Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina......May 9, 1862 [These orders were not approved by the President.] Norfolk, Va., occupied by United States forces under General Wool......May 10, 1862 Merrimac blown up by the Confederates......May 11, 1862 Department of Agriculture established......May 15, 1862 General Butler issues General Order No. 28 at New Orleans regarding the conduct of the women of that city......May 15, 1862 [This order produced great excitement in the South, and, with other acts of the general, called forth a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), South Carolina, (search)
n the Confederate steamer Theodora for Europe to represent the Confederate government......Oct. 12, 1861 Twenty-five vessels of the great Southern expedition anchor off Port Royal......Nov. 4, 1861 Federals capture Forts Walker and Beauregard, Port Royal......Nov. 7, 1861 Confederate privateer Isabel runs the blockade at Charleston, avoiding eleven United States vessels......Dec. 27, 1861 Gen. David Hunter declares free the slaves in Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina......May 9, 1862 Battle of Secessionville (James Island), in which Col. T. G. Lamar defeats the Federals under Gen. Henry W. Benham......June 16, 1862 Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard assumes command of the Department of South Carolina and Georgia......Sept. 24, 1862 Gen. J. M. Brannan defeats the Confederates under General Walker in the battle of Pocotaligo......Oct. 22, 1862 Commodore Samuel F. Dupont's squadron is repulsed in the battle of Charleston Harbor......April 7, 1863 Colonel Montgomery,